Top stories When stars collide and monkeys sleep with deer

first_imgColliding stars will light up the night sky in 2022A team of astronomers is making a bold prediction: In 2022, give or take a year, a pair of stars will merge and explode, becoming one of the brightest objects in the sky for a short period. It’s notoriously hard to predict when such stellar catastrophes will occur, but this binary pair is engaged in a well-documented dance of death that will inevitably come to a head in the next few years, they say.Your choice of a life partner is no accident Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Chances are you’re going to marry someone a lot like you. Similar intelligence, similar height, similar body weight. A new study of tens of thousands of married couples suggests that this isn’t an accident. We don’t marry educated people because we happen to hang around with educated people, for example—we actively seek them out. And these preferences are shaping our genomes.Study suggests surprising reason killer whales go through menopauseOnly three known species go through menopause: killer whales, short-finned pilot whales, and humans. Two years ago, scientists suggested whales do this to focus their attention on the survival of their families rather than on birthing more offspring. But now this same team reports there’s another—and darker—reason: Older females enter menopause because their eldest daughters begin having calves, leading to fights over resources. The findings might also apply to humans, the scientists say.Why this monkey tried to have sex with a deerJapanese macaques and sika deer live comfortably together on Japan’s Yakushima Island: The deer eat fruit the monkeys drop from the trees, and the monkeys groom and sometimes hitch a ride on the deer. But a couple years ago, one of the macaques took this relationship to a new level. Unable to get a mate of his own kind, this low-ranking snow monkey used the deer’s back for his pleasure.This 20-cent paper pinwheel could transform medicine in the developing worldA whirligig is so simple, even a kindergartener can make one. But this ancient toy—a pinwheellike device whose circular motion is powered by two twisting strings—may soon transform medicine in the developing world, thanks to an inexpensive new version that can separate blood as quickly as some commercial centrifuges. If the “paperfuge,” as it is called, makes it past regulatory hurdles, engineers say, it could prove a portable and cheap tool for diagnosing anemia and infections such as HIV and malaria in places where resources are scarce.Exclusive Q&A: Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. on Trump’s proposed vaccine commissionEnvironmental attorney Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., an outspoken vaccine critic, told ScienceInsider he was asked by President-elect Donald Trump to chair a “vaccine safety and scientific integrity” commission. (A Trump spokesperson, however, later said that “no decisions have been made at this time” about such a commission.) Kennedy espouses discredited links between vaccines and neurological disorders, including autism. He has also been harshly critical of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which recommends the childhood vaccine schedule. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Podcast Coddled puppies trees that make their own rain and ancient mariners

first_img This week we hear stories on new satellite measurements that suggest the Amazon makes its own rain for part of the year, puppies raised with less smothering moms do better in guide dog school, and what DNA can tell us about ancient Greeks’ near mythical origins with Online News Editor David Grimm.Sarah Crespi talks to Lizzie Wade about coastal and underwater evidence of a watery route for the Americas’ first people.Listen to previous podcasts.[Image: Lizzie Wade; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Lizzie Wade last_img

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Fighting back against alternative facts Experts share their secrets

first_img Fighting back against ‘alternative facts’: Experts share their secrets Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Appeal to the 60%. On any given issue, a group of people will contain 20% at each end of the spectrum who are so deeply dug in they’ll never be convinced. Forget them, Bayer said, and appeal to those who are persuadable. Appeal to shared social values. Bayer and others pointed to the climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe, an evangelical Christian who makes inroads with fellow evangelicals through their shared worldview. In conversations, we can find things to connect about. “Politicians do that all the time,” Bayer said. They might say, “I’m just like you—I take the train.”  Appeal to the “golden child” of a group—the most admired and respected member of the group. “Every family has one,” Bayer said. Tell stories, and help people relate to them. In 2010 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., Markey, then a member of the U.S House of Representatives, persuaded his colleagues to pass a bill mandating that iPhones and other consumer electronics be accessible to the handicapped. To convince them, he called in a veteran who was blinded while serving in the Iraq War. The bill passed. “It wasn’t a fair fight,” Bayer said.  Ask for incremental change, rather than wholesale change, then do it again. For example, Bayer asked an audience member for a pad of paper to pass around to collect emails. Then he followed quickly, “Can you get me a glass of water?”  AUSTIN—Days after President Donald Trump took office, his spokesperson Kellyanne Conway coined a term that ricocheted around the world. Chuck Todd, host of NBC’s Meet the Press, confronted her about an overinflated White House estimate of the crowd size at the president’s inauguration. “Don’t be so overly dramatic about it, Chuck,” she shot back. “You’re saying it’s a falsehood. [But] Sean Spicer, our press secretary, gave alternative facts.” The exchange became fodder for 1000 late-night TV monologues, and it seemed to launch a new era of degraded public discourse, in which falsehoods become “alternative truths,” and unwelcome news for politicians becomes “fake news.” At a lively brainstorming session here yesterday at the annual meeting of AAAS, which publishes Science, approximately five dozen researchers, teachers, journalists, students, and science advocates brainstormed ways to push back.Session leader Mark Bayer, an Arlington, Virginia–based consultant and former longtime aide to Senator Edward Markey (D–MA), opened up with some cold water for the crowd. “Facts were never enough” to make a convincing case to people, he said, “so let’s just get over that.” Even Aristotle, in his classic Rhetoric, writes about the need to persuade the audience that you’re credible (ethos) and appeal to their emotions (pathos), as well as using logical arguments (logos), Bayer said. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A sign of the times Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email By Benno Hansen from Copenhagen (Science Trumps Alternative Facts) (CC BY 2.0) via Wikimedia Commons When he asked attendees why they’d turned up, he got an earful. “I’m appalled that we see people at the president’s level peddling alternative facts, and I want to know what the hell we can do about it,” a Texas college professor said. “I’d like to understand how to have these conversations without getting emotional,” said a counterpart from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. “I’m looking for fresh ideas in this space,” said Brenda Ekwurzel, a senior climate scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Washington, D.C. “I was assigned to this session to break up any fights,” added Lee Anne Willson, an emerita professor of physics and astronomy at Iowa State University in Ames, and a member of AAAS’s program committee for the conference.Although current debates about climate change, evolution, and vaccines may suggest otherwise, trust in science has remained relatively constant over the decades, pointed out Yves Gingras, a historian and sociologist of science from the University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. So why is it so hard to change people’s minds about “alternative facts” that are demonstrably false?Alternative facts are not facts at all, but socially sanctioned beliefs, said Bayer, who has studied the scientific literature of persuasion enough to call himself a “persuasion nerd.” But there are ways to change minds, he said: By Dan FerberFeb. 17, 2018 , 3:30 PM These tactics don’t just work with strangers—they work at Thanksgiving dinner as well. And they can help smooth out the rough tenor of today’s discourse, Bayer said. “We’ve seen this movie before—but now it’s in HD. I’m not pessimistic.”Check out all of our coverage of AAAS 2018.last_img read more

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Zapping mutant DNA in mitochondria could treat major class of genetic disease

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Mitch LeslieSep. 24, 2018 , 11:00 AM CNRI/Science Source Zapping mutant DNA in mitochondria could treat major class of genetic disease Descendants of ancient bacteria that took up residence inside early eukaryotic cells, mitochondria sport their own small genomes and a distinct set of proteins not encoded by genes in the nucleus. Each cell can contain thousands of these organelles, and mutations in mtDNA cause a range of illnesses. “If you take all the mitochondrial diseases together, they are one of the most common causes of genetic disease in humans,” says molecular biologist Michal Minczuk of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, who led one of the research teams.The controversial “three-parent baby” approach can protect children from inheriting mitochondrial diseases. It involves replacing the defective mitochondria in the mother’s egg with those of a healthy donor. But researchers haven’t discovered any treatments for a person who inherits faulty mtDNA. “It’s a large unmet need,” Ekker says.Snipping the mutant DNA could help because mitochondria destroy the severed molecules. Moreover, potential treatments might not need to eliminate all the defective mtDNA in the body’s myriad mitochondria. Mitochondrial disease patients have mtDNA copies with and without the harmful mutation, and the ratio between the two varieties must reach a certain level before symptoms occur, notes mitochondrial biologist Carlos Moraes of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida, who led the other research team. “If you can lower this ratio below the threshold, the clinical manifestations might go away.”CRISPR, however, was not an option. It depends on a RNA strand to guide the DNA-cutting protein to the right spot in the genome, and most researchers doubt that mitochondria can take up these guide RNAs. So both teams turned back the clock to the pre-CRISPR era and tested two other editing approaches—zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activatorlike effector nucleases (TALENs). Both consist of DNA-cutting proteins that are designed to home in on DNA without guide RNAs. These systems are more cumbersome and less versatile than CRISPR, but they, too, can slice DNA at a specific location.Both groups of researchers harnessed similar viruses, considered harmless, to ferry genes for the DNA-editing proteins into the cells of the mutant mice. In this strain, some mtDNA copies have a mutation in the gene coding for a type of transfer RNA (tRNA), which helps assemble mitochondrial proteins. The animals have less of this tRNA variety than normal, although they only develop a subtle symptom, a mild heart abnormality.In their study, Moraes, his colleague Sandra Bacman, and their team injected viruses loaded with TALENs genes into a leg muscle on each animal’s right side. As a control, they shot viruses lacking the TALENs genes into the same muscle on the left side. After 6 months, the amount of mutant mitochondrial DNA was more than 50% lower in the muscle that received TALENs, and the ratio of damaged to normal DNA was below the 50:50 threshold that typically produces symptoms.Minczuk, along with his postdoc Payam Gammage and colleagues, designed equivalent ZFNs and injected viruses carrying them into the tail veins of the mice. Once in the bloodstream, the viruses traveled to the heart, which also harbored the defective mtDNA. When the scientists analyzed the animals’ cardiac tissue 65 days later, they found that the fraction of mutant mitochondrial DNA was about 40% lower.Because the mild heart abnormality is hard to document, the researchers used molecular indicators to gauge the success of the treatment. Both groups determined that levels of the tRNA that is scarce in the mutant mice surged after gene therapy. Minczuk’s team also measured several metabolic molecules that suggested the animals’ mitochondria were working better.Researchers agree that to apply the strategy in people, they will have to ensure that the genes for TALENs and ZFNs reach the right tissues in the right amounts. Nonetheless, Moraes says he and his colleagues are trying to organize a safety trial of their approach in people with a mtDNA mutation that could begin as early as next year. Minczuk says his group also hopes to launch clinical trials, but he doesn’t have a timetable. “It’s a hopeful moment for these diseases,” Gammage adds. Emailcenter_img These mitochondria contain their own DNA, but they can also carry mutations that cause disease. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country CRISPR, the genome editor celebrated as a potentially revolutionary medical tool, isn’t omnipotent. Mitochondria, the organelles that supply a cell’s energy, harbor their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mutations there can have devastating consequences including deafness, seizures, and muscle weakness. Genome editing might be a remedy, but mitochondria appear to be off-limits to CRISPR.  Now, two studies published this week in Nature Medicine reveal that two older genome-editing tools can slash the amount of defective mtDNA in mice bred to have a mitochondrial disease, counteracting the effects of the mutation. The proof-of-principle results could open the way for the first treatments for mitochondrial diseases. “These are remarkable findings that make it possible to even consider doing this in humans,” says mitochondrial biologist Martin Picard of the Columbia University Irving Medical Center, who was not involved in the work.Turning these results into a treatment will be tricky. The genes encoding the genome editors had to be introduced by viruses, and researchers have long struggled to make similar gene therapy efforts work. But, “These are the right experiments to get ready to go into people,” says molecular geneticist Stephen Ekker of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who wasn’t connected to either study. In fact, both groups are already aiming to launch clinical trials.last_img read more

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Archaeological society tries to stem continuing controversy over MeToo scandal

first_img The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) continues to battle fallout for the way it handled a #MeToo scandal at its annual meeting last week. The organization faced a firestorm of criticism on social media for not immediately ejecting an alleged harasser from the meeting after being informed about his presence and a university investigation that found accusations against him credible. Today, as archaeologists continued to vent at their own society, it published an open letter and video from President Joe Watkins personally apologizing for not taking action and laying out actions SAA will take, including updating its sexual harassment policy and providing training to staff on its “effective and compassionate implementation.”“Finally, the start of a sincere response from the SAA,” tweeted Stephanie Halmhofer, a cultural resources management archaeologist with In Situ Archaeological Consulting in Roberts Creek, Canada. But it remains to be seen whether the latest apology will be enough to staunch the flow of archaeologists pledging to leave SAA. Meanwhile, other societies have announced plans to revamp their harassment policies to handle similar situations.Two days ago, SAA apologized for “the impact, stress, and fear the situation caused to victims of sexual harassment within our field,” as well as for its own delay in issuing an apology. But on 17 April, it published a controversial timeline of events that sparked another social media row. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Archaeological society tries to stem continuing controversy over #MeToo scandal By Lizzie WadeApr. 18, 2019 , 4:45 PM DARIA KIRPACH/@SALZMANART Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email The trouble began when David Yesner, an archaeologist who retired from the University of Alaska in Anchorage (UAA) in 2017 showed up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for SAA’s annual meeting, which ran from 10–14 April. Yesner had been banned from UAA’s campus and events 2 days before the meeting began, after a Title IX investigation found nine women’s accusations of sexual harassment and assault to be credible. Three claimants in the investigation were also at the SAA meeting and reported Yesner’s presence to the organization. But during the meeting, SAA did not reveal to them or others whether it had ejected Yesner.Yesner did not respond to Science’s requests for comment and has not publicly commented on the accusations.On 16 April, SAA said it would be adding an on-site counselor to future meetings and instituting board and staff training on sexual harassment, as well as a “member-led, independent committee to address member concerns,” all steps that Watkins highlighted again in today’s open letter and video. But Tuesday’s statement wasn’t enough to calm the growing outrage. “An apology without more concrete steps and/or changes is not enough,” tweeted Sara Gonzalez, an archaeologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “Your apology should be directed at the brave women who reported … abuse and assaults.”Then, on 17 April, SAA clarified that it had in fact ejected Yesner from the meeting on the afternoon of Friday, 12 April, hours after two official complaints were filed. (One was filed by Norma Johnson, a graduate student in archaeology at UAA and a claimant in the Title IX investigation.) “At no time before Friday, April 12, 2019 did SAA receive any information regarding Mr. Yesner which would have precluded his attendance at the meeting,” SAA said in its statement.But many archaeologists say that ignores actions taken by freelance journalist (and former Science correspondent) Michael Balter, who says he notified SAA staff about Yesner’s presence and the results of the Title IX investigation on Thursday morning. Balter escorted Yesner out of the meeting that afternoon, but Yesner apparently returned. Balter reported being banned from the SAA meeting on Friday morning.Multiple lawyers and consultants specializing in sexual harassment have confirmed to Science that SAA could have removed Yesner from the meeting before official reports were filed, as the meeting was a private event.Today, Watkins attempted to repair the damage with his open letter. “I want to apologize for the events that happened last week in Albuquerque under my watch,” he wrote. “I failed to take the kind of action we should have taken to address the distress of the attendees at our meeting. I allowed myself to be convinced that our harassment policy was more important than the feelings of our members.”Early reaction was positive. “The president’s statement echoes many of the frustrations that we have felt in the past week. I was impressed” with how he took responsibility for placing policy over members’ experiences, says Kristina Killgrove, a bioarchaeologist at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, who resigned as chair of SAA’s media relations committee because of the scandal. But she would like more clarity on how the SAA board will work with organization’s staff to make sure these changes are made, as well as precisely how SAA plans to improve its communications with membership and the public. “SAA membership both at and away from this year’s conference were shocked that their voices on Twitter and Facebook were insufficient to catch the board’s attention in real time. I hope that the SAA’s plan to revamp its communication processes includes more than lip service to the power of social media,” she says.Meanwhile, other societies are taking a lesson from the firestorm. On 16 April, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) in Arlington, Virginia, offered a clear solution to situations like this, in an updated policy on sexual harassment and assault. “Individuals who are currently sanctioned for assault or harassment by an adjudicating institution (e.g., a university) will be barred from taking part in AAA events,” the policy reads. “Appeals may be requested in the case of advance registration; on-site registration for such individuals will not be permitted.”AAA Executive Director Edward Liebow told Science the organization had already been working on enacting “an enhanced policy” for its upcoming annual meeting but that the SAA incident “certainly hastened along our procedural discussion.”The American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) in Herndon, Virginia, is also considering updating its policies in response. “As events at the SAA [meeting] unfolded, we began taking notes,” says AAPA President Anne Grauer. “We will be discussing these issues in detail at a Board of Directors meeting shortly.”Others have urged the American Association of Geographers (AAG) in Washington, D.C., to revoke the membership of faculty who are found to violate Title IX guidelines or who resign because of harassment accusations, as well as ban them from future AAG events.In Yesner’s case, the Alaska Anthropological Association in Anchorage appears to have been the first to act, banning him from its meetings and events on 12 April—4 days after UAA barred him from campus and while the SAA meeting was still going on. 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Is this bee solitary or social The answer may depend on an

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Elizabeth PennisiOct. 18, 2018 , 5:00 AM Is this bee solitary or social? The answer may depend on an autism-linked gene Brian Valentine Email One of biology’s enduring mysteries is how some animals—from humans to honey bees—became so social. Now, a study suggests that, in the inconspicuous sweat bee, changes to the expression of a single gene could determine which bees are solitary and which are social. The gene, which has previously been linked to autism in humans, has also been connected to social behavior in animals like mice and locusts. The new discovery puts scientists one step closer toward demonstrating a common evolutionary basis for social behavior.“People have been taking about the genetics of sociality for years,” says Bernard Crespi, an evolutionary biologist at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada, who was not involved with the work. “Finding this gene is a real watershed for the field.”Sweat bees don’t have the same massive colonies as honey bees, whose hundreds of workers care for and protect a single egg-laying queen. But the tiny, gentle bees have some interesting social arrangements: In some groups and species, workers help a reproducing queen, as honey bees do; in other groups, sweat bee females tend their own broods. This difference has led scientists to think sweat bees may hold the key to understanding how more complex insect societies began to evolve.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Sweat bees are helping researchers understand the genetic basis of social behavior. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) In the 1950s, French biologist Cécile Plateaux-Quénu documented two distinct behaviors in a single species of sweat bee, Lasioglossum albipes. Females in cooler parts of France didn’t generally have helpers, whereas those in warmer parts did—there, female bees would lay two sets of eggs, and hatchlings from the first set would tend to the second set of eggs. Plateaux-Quénu’s studies showed, too, that this difference was inherited.Two decades later, Sarah Kocher, an evolutionary geneticist now at Princeton University, decided to follow up on Plateaux-Quénu’s pioneering studies. She collected 150 bees from three cool and three warm regions of France. While a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University, she and colleagues analyzed the bees’ DNA to find genetic differences that might explain the two behaviors.After sequencing and comparing genomes from the six groups, the researchers found 200 differences centered around 62 genes. One gene, called syntaxin 1a, stood out. It is responsible for creating syntaxin, a protein important in the transmission of signals between nerve cells. The gene, linked to social behavior in a number of animals, was the one that best differentiated social from solitary sweat bees, Kocher says. “It seemed a good place to start.”So Kocher measured how active the gene was in the social and the solitary bees. The social bees’ gene was about 15 times as active as that of the solitary bees, her team reports today in Nature Communications, making it a strong candidate for the switch to sociality. Next, her team evaluated seven differences to DNA on or near the syntaxin gene to see which were the most powerful in controlling its activity. The answer? A DNA sequence in part of the syntaxin gene that does not code for a protein.These findings are in line with syntaxin function in other animals, Kocher says. For example, locusts that feed on their own but come together to migrate have increased syntaxin activity during migration. Mice lacking syntaxin have altered levels of hormones that influence social behavior. And several studies in humans have implicated syntaxin in autism and other disorders that lead to hyper- or hyposocial behavior.This is not the first gene linked to both insect social behavior and autism. Last year, researchers showed that honey bees that react less to danger than most other workers have altered levels of activity in other genes implicated in autism. These genes code for proteins with functions similar to syntaxin’s.The next step, says Gene Robinson, a behavioral genomicist and director of the University of Illinois Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology in Urbana, who did the honey bee work, is to figure out how the genes in his study—and syntaxin—affect brain development and function. And Crespi urges researchers to take a closer look at syntaxin’s activity in people with autism: “If it’s involved with cooperation and social behaviors, then it could be a target for a new therapeutic agent.”last_img read more

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Town of Taylor to purchase industrial park for development

first_imgPhoto by Toni GibbonsMembers of the Taylor Town Council listen to Town Manager Gus Lundberg give an update on the potential purchase of the 147 acres known as the Roy Palmer Business Park at the meeting on Nov. 1. Pictured are (left to right) Councilman Jason Brubaker, Vice Mayor Shawn Palmer, Mayor David Smith and Councilman Fay Hatch. Town of Taylor to purchase industrial park for development November 7, 2018center_img By Toni Gibbons       In ongoing efforts to increase economic development, the Taylor Town Council unanimously gave Town Manager Gus Lundberg the green light to prepare the documents for the purchase of approximately 147 acresSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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Yoga postures light up UN Headquarters ahead of International Yoga Day

first_img Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan By PTI |United Nations | Published: June 20, 2019 9:57:01 pm Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach “Have you made Surya Namaskar a part of your routine? Do watch this video to know why it is a good idea to do so and the advantages that come with regularly practising it. #YogaDay2019,” Modi said in a tweet. The Indian mission will organise several events over the course of the next two-days to mark the 5th International Yoga Day on June 21.‘Yoga with the Gurus’ will be held Thursday evening on the sprawling North Lawn in the United Nations Headquarters and Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed will be Chief Guest at the event.The outdoor event will have a session led by Yoga gurus Swami Paramananda, Kevin Tobar and his associates from Bhakti Cente and Sunaina Rekhi from India. In addition, there will be musical and dance performances by “Indian Raga”. On June 21, the commemoration day, a panel discussion on the theme of ‘Yoga for Climate Action’ will be held at the UN headquarters.Moderated by Naidu, the discussion will feature lifestyle coach and motivational speaker Gaur Gopal Das, Acharya for International Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Centre Srinivasan, Yoga teacher, author and lecturer Eddie Stern, author, speaker and philosopher Simon Haas and Kusumita Pedersen, Professor of Religious Studies at St Francis College, Brooklyn. Yoga postures light up UN Headquarters ahead of International Yoga Day Yoga postures were projected on the North Facade of the UN Headquarters Building (Source: Twitter/AkbaruddinIndia)The United Nations headquarters was lit up with postures of ‘Surya Namaskar’ and the message of ‘Yoga for Climate Action’ as India’s Permanent Mission to the UN kick-started its celebrations for the 5th International Day of Yoga. Advertising Advertising Top News center_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Exhibitions on Yoga are also going on in the UN building, including the ‘Exhibition on International Day of Yoga – World Photo Series’.The International Day of Yoga is celebrated annually on June 21 to raise global awareness about the benefits of the ancient Indian practice.On December 11, 2014, the United Nations General Assembly declared June 21 as ‘International Day of Yoga’, months after Prime Minister Modi proposed the idea. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield On a foggy and rainy evening on Wednesday, yoga postures were projected on the North Facade of the UN Headquarters Building during a special ceremony attended by India’s Permanent Representative to the UN Ambassador Syed Akbaruddin, Deputy Permanent Representative Ambassador K Nagaraj Naidu and diplomats and officials from the Indian mission.The North Facade of the UN Secretariat building was awash with ‘Surya Namaskar’ or ‘Sun Salutation’ postures projected against a colourful background.The Surya Namaskar is one of the most popular and significant yoga exercises, with Prime Minister Narendra Modi also tweeting about its benefits in a special video made for the occasion of the Yoga Day this year. Best Of Express After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Marcher Malware Poses Triple Threat to Android Users

first_imgThe likelihood of the Marcher campaign spreading is very high, said Proofpoint’s Wheeler.”Marcher has been observed worldwide, and we have already seen a variety of schemes to distribute the malware, primarily via SMS, and increasingly sophisticated social engineering from actors associated with Marcher,” he said.”Any attack such as this one is usually a canary in the coal mine,” noted Rajiv Dholakia, vice president of products at Nok Nok Labs.”One should expect variations of this to continue to evolve and spread around the world,” he told TechNewsWorld.It’s not unusual for malware to be released in a single country or region and then, depending on its success, expand to other countries, said Damien Hugoo, director of product marketing at Easy Solutions.”We have seen many banking Trojans start out in Europe in the past year and expand globally,” he told TechNewsWorld. Not Your Typical Email Attack Protect Yourself Future Expansion The Marcher campaign in Austria is significantly more coordinated than the standard email attack, noted Matt Vernhout, director of privacy at 250ok.”However, it may have limited impact, as the number of steps required to complete the attack may be more than most individuals are willing to complete,” he told TechNewsWorld.Marcher has been around for a long time, which is why its perpetrators may find it necessary to modify the way they create landing pages to ensnare victims.”This is likely because security vendors and domain hosts are hot on their heels shutting them down,” said Armando Orozco, a senior malware intelligence analyst with Malwarebytes.”They need other avenues to keep their business model going,” he told TechNewsWorld. A three-pronged banking malware campaign has been infecting Android phones since the beginning of this year, according to security researchers.Attackers have been stealing credentials, planting the Marcher banking Trojan on phones, and nicking credit card information. So far, they have targeted customers of BankAustria, Raiffeisen Meine Bank and Sparkasse, but the campaign could spread beyond Vienna.The attack begins with a phishing message delivered by email to a phone, security researchers at Proofpoint explained in a Friday post. The message pretends to be from the target’s bank and contains a link that often is obscured by a Web address shortener like bit.ly.The link takes the victim to a bogus bank page where the bandits request the target’s bank account or PIN information.Once the hackers have that information, they instruct victims to log into their accounts using their email address and password. All the information entered at the fake banking site is harvested by the hackers. center_img Permission to Hijack Instead of getting access to an account, banking customers get a popup message instructing them to install the bank’s security app. About 7 percent of targets have downloaded the “security app,” which is really the Marcher malware, Proofpoint estimated.Once installed, the malware asks for extensive permissions — everything from receiving, sending, reading and writing SMS messages to opening network sockets, reading address books, changing system settings and even locking the phone.In addition, when applications like the Google Play store are opened, the malware will ask for the user’s credit card information.While banking Trojans and phishing are common fare for cybercriminals, combining the two in a focused campaign isn’t, noted Patrick Wheeler, director of threat intelligence at Proofpoint.”In general, we don’t see a lot of crossover between phishing actors and those who distribute malware,” he told TechNewsWorld. “The combination of the socially engineered banking Trojan download and multistep phishing attack that gathers credentials or financial information at each step, is fairly unusual.” What can consumers do to protect themselves from this kind of attack?One defense is to use Android phones that are easy to keep current with the latest version of the operating system, like Google’s Pixel and Nexus phones, suggested Daniel Miessler, director of advisory services at IOActive.”Pixel and Nexus stay updated constantly,” he told TechNewsWorld.Also, “never use app stores other than the official Google Play store,” Miessler advised, and “for the highest security, refrain from installing apps that are not extremely well known and well-tested.”Consumers need to be vigilant.”As with phishing attacks on any platform, the onus is on consumers to beware of scams and look for red flags. Unsolicited emails or texts asking for information or giving extensive reasoning for why they should download an app are clear warning signs,” advised Proofpoint’s Wheeler.”Apps that ask for extensive permissions or that do not come from legitimate app stores should also be avoided,” he said, “unless consumers are absolutely sure of the origin and necessity of the app.” John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John.last_img read more

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AI pathology diagnostic tool developed using deep learning technology from Olympus

first_imgRelated StoriesX Line Objective Lenses Break Optical Barriers with Simultaneously Improved Image Flatness, Chromatic Aberration Correction and Numerical ApertureOlympus offers advantages of light sheet microscopy and high-quality optics in Alpha³ systemOlympus and USC announce new partnership to advance cancer researchTable 1: When the threshold was set to assess all 297 ADC samples as positive (100% sensitivity), 225 out of the 489 NADC samples were assessed as negative. This represents 100% sensitivity (297 out of 297) and 46% specificity (225 out of 489).The classification threshold determined to detect all ADC achieved 46% specificity with NADCs. With 140 new cases (67 of ADC and 73 of NADC), this algorithm and the threshold achieved 100% sensitivity and 50.7% specificity as a final evaluation (Table 2). Oct 18 2018Since 2017, Olympus Corporation has participated in a joint research program that has the potential to help streamline the workload of clinical pathologists, called “A New Approach to Develop Computer-Aided Diagnosis Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Gastric Biopsy Specimens” with Dr. Kiyomi Taniyama, President of the Kure Medical Center and Chugoku Cancer Center. This research paired Dr. Taniyama’s knowledge and experience of pathology diagnosis of the gastric system and digital pathology, with Olympus’ imaging system technology and proficiency in AI development. Olympus, with its leading market share1 in microscopes, has continued to develop a CAD solution using AI for pathology diagnosis based on its proprietary deep learning technology.Olympus used gastric biopsy specimens collected for diagnosis at the Kure Medical Center and Chugoku Cancer Center between 2015 and 2018 to develop deep learning technology, which consisted of a multi-resolutional convolutional neural network2 (CNN). The deep learning technology’s unique CNN was developed by Olympus and is designed to analyze the features of pathology sample images. Using the CNN, the deep learning technology was used to identify the area of ADC tissues on images. Based on the result, images were classified into adenocarcinoma (ADC) and non-adenocarcinoma (NADC). The research involved two stages: the learning stage where the AI learns the CNN model using digital pathology images and associated information, and the prediction stage where the AI classifies ADC images and NADC images using the model that it learned.The AI algorithm was developed using 368 whole slide pathology images for learning, and 786 sample images (297 of ADC and 489 of NADC) for the classification threshold tuning (Table 1). Table 2: A final evaluation was made on 140 new sample images (67 samples of ADC and 73 samples of NADC). As a result, all 67 ADC samples were assessed as positive and 37 out of the 73 NADC samples were assessed as negative. This represents 100% sensitivity (67 out of 67) and 50.7% specificity (37 out of 73).CAD software using AI with a low false negative rate6 can help pathologists detect positive samples. This software has the potential to eliminate the duplication of efforts in the workload of pathologists and further improve the accuracy of pathology diagnosis of gastric biopsies (of which, over four million tests are performed annually in Japan) by screening negative samples and helping prevent positive samples from being overlooked.To learn more about Olympus (AI) efforts in the Life Sciences area, please visit: Olympus-Global.com/news/2018/nr00869.html.last_img read more

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