How Neymars Injury Affects Brazils Chances at the World Cup

Brazil has been FiveThirtyEight’s frontrunner to win the World Cup since the beginning of the tournament. But A Seleção will have to do it without its star, Neymar, who is out of the tournament after fracturing a vertebra in Brazil’s quarterfinal win against Colombia. In the semifinal against Germany on Tuesday, Brazil will also be without defender Thiago Silva, who was suspended after accumulating two yellow cards (Silva will return if Brazil reaches the final).Our forecast, which gives Brazil a 54 percent chance of treating its home fans to a title, doesn’t account for these player absences. This article will attempt to measure their impact and recalculate the numbers.We have some reasonably good news for Brazil. Even without Neymar and Silva, the team remains the leading contender to win the World Cup in our estimation. You may or may not agree with the math, but the intuition behind it is this: Soccer is a team sport, and Brazil is a very deep team. Whether Brazil is better than Germany without Neymar and Silva is up for debate. However, Brazil will play at home, where the national team hasn’t lost a competitive match since 1975.Our rating systemOur World Cup forecasts are based on ESPN’s Soccer Power Index (SPI). SPI is essentially two ratings systems rolled into one. It measures a national team’s performance, placing more weight on its most competitive matches, and evaluates the talent on its roster based on players’ performance in national and club matches.The player ratings work by means of a plus-minus system that assigns or subtracts points from players based on goals scored and allowed at the time they’re on the pitch. They include data from national team matches, along with the top-flight club leagues in Spain, England, Italy, Germany and France, and matches from the Champions League.In principle, the system operates something like this. The average English Premier League team scores and allows about 1.4 goals per game. But let’s say Arsenal wins a game 3-1 instead against an average EPL opponent. Its three goals scored are 1.6 goals above the league average, so we have 1.6 goals worth of extra credit to apportion out to the players who were on the pitch at the time. Arsenal also allowed 0.4 goals less than average, so there’s 0.4 goals worth of defensive credit to split up, too.In theory, this allows us to estimate the impact of any one player. But the plus-minus works better for some players than others. The statistics it accounts for are goals scored, bookings and the starting lineups and substitutions of a match, along with the players’ positions. This works fine for strikers like Neymar, whose main objective is to score goals and set them up, but it isn’t as helpful for defenders like Silva.1Soccer statistics are rapidly improving — and we hope to be able to account for things like time of possession, passes completed and tackles in future versions of the system. SPI will give about the right overall amount of credit to the back line and midfielders on a team — for instance, to Silva’s Paris Saint-Germain after an impressive victory. But if Silva is better than the other defenders, it will give him too little credit and his teammates too much.So we’ll use the SPI method to account for Neymar’s absence, and then an alternative method that might more accurately measure the loss of Silva.The impact of Neymar’s absenceFor forwards and strikers, the SPI plus-minus ratings line up reasonably well with subjective perceptions. The following chart compares SPI plus-minus ratings for forwards, measured as the number of additional goals they help score and prevent per 90 minutes of play, as compared to The Guardian’s consensus list of the top 100 footballers in the world.The correlation isn’t perfect, but it’s reasonably good. The amazing Lionel Messi, along with Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo, rate as the best forwards in the world by far in both systems.Based on data from his FC Barcelona games over the past two years, along with his recent play for Argentina, for instance, we estimate that Messi contributes about 0.65 goals per game relative to an average international footballer. (Almost all of that impact comes from Messi helping his team get more goals — only a little bit is defense or goal prevention.)How big is that impact? The SPI match predictor estimates that if you put Messi on an average team, it would go from winning 50 percent of its games (assuming a knockout-style format with no draws) to around 65 percent instead. That’s impressive — not far from the effect you might see by replacing an average NBA player with LeBron James. But James plays a 5-on-5 game, while Messi and Ronaldo play one with 11 players to a side.Neymar isn’t quite at Messi’s or Ronaldo’s level — nor is anyone else. Instead, SPI estimates his impact at about 0.4 goals per 90 minutes. Almost all of this (0.37 goals) comes from increasing his team’s scoring, while just a fraction (0.03 goals) comes from improving its goal prevention.These player ratings can be carried forward to the team level. For instance, if you removed Neymar from the pitch and replaced him with an average international footballer, Brazil’s scoring would drop by 0.37 goals per 90 minutes, we estimate. Brazil would also allow an additional 0.03 goals per 90 minutes of play.But the players replacing Neymar are going to be well above average. An average international soccer player, according to SPI, is something like a starter on Israel or Libya or Uzbekistan. A player on Brazil’s second or third string would be a star on one of those sides.It’s not clear exactly who will replace Neymar. In fact, it may wind up being a combination of players, given that his injury will have knockoff effects on Brazil’s depth. But Neymar’s playing time will likely be distributed principally among three players: the forwards Bernard and Jo, and the winger Willian.Of the three, we have the best data on Willian, since he plays his club football for Chelsea in the EPL — one of the leagues we track. SPI estimates he’s worth about 0.2 goals per 90 minutes relative to an average footballer. If Neymar is worth about 0.4 goals per 90 minutes, Willian is 0.2 goals per 90 minutes worse. (Some numbers in the tables below may look slightly off due to rounding.)For Bernard, who plays for Shakhtar Donetsk in Ukraine, we have data only from his performance with Brazil, plus a smattering of Champions League matches. And for Jo, who plays for Atlético in Brazil, we have the national team data only. But they rate similarly to Willian, at about +0.2 goals per 90 minutes.Certainly these players lack Neymar’s explosiveness and creativity. But this isn’t a total disaster for Brazil. Ratings in the range of +0.2 goals per 90 minutes imply that Willian, Bernard and Jo would belong somewhere in the top 200 or 250 footballers in the world, and would start for most of the teams that made the World Cup.The impact of Silva’s absenceBrazil will also be without Thiago Silva for the Germany match, and coach Luiz Felipe Scolari has a number of options to replace him. Brazil played Dani Alves in its first four World Cup matches, then replaced him with Maicon for its game against Colombia. Scolari could choose to play them both instead, though Brazil would need to rotate its formation, as they both typically play right back rather than center. Scolari could also go with Dante, who plays center defense for Bayern Munich and who has the advantage of being familiar with some of Germany’s stars. Henrique, who plays as a center back or defensive midfielder, would be another option.The SPI plus-minus ratings suggest that there’s hardly any difference between Silva and some of these options — and what impact it does find comes on offense, such as on set pieces.But this conclusion may be misguided. As I mentioned, the SPI ratings are a crude tool for evaluating defensive players. They do get us somewhere: SPI knows that Silva plays for Brazil and Paris Saint-Germain, two excellent teams, and gives him credit for being in those lineups. But it will have trouble distinguishing truly world-class defensive players from merely very good ones.There’s a more aggressive way to approach the problem, however, which is to approximate Silva’s defensive value by using his position on The Guardian’s top 100 ranking. Silva was No. 17 on that list.As I mentioned, the SPI plus-minus should be pretty solid for forwards and strikers. So we can calibrate the value of Silva by estimating how much a striker rated as the No. 17 player in the world would be worth. This value turns out to be about 0.37 goals per 90 minutes based on the regression line I drew in the chart above. By comparison, the raw SPI numbers put Silva’s impact at 0.19 goals per 90 minutes, considering both offensive and defensive contributions.So let’s assume that The Guardian’s panelists have it right and that Silva is in fact worth 0.37 goals per match. We’ll further assume that SPI is missing Silva’s defense but that it gauges his offensive contributions about right. That implies having Silva on the pitch reduces an opponent’s goal-scoring by about 0.28 goals per 90 minutes relative to an average player, while he adds 0.09 goals per match with his offense.If we make this fix for Silva, however, we should do so for Dante and Dani Alves, who also rank in The Guardian’s top 100. (We won’t make any adjustment for Henrique and Maicon, who are outside the top 100.)Averaging the figures for Silva’s potential replacements yields a combination of players that rate at +0.22 goals per 90 minutes. That’s about 0.15 goals per match worse than Silva. More precisely, we estimate Brazil’s goal-scoring to decline by 0.03 goals per 90 minutes without Silva, and for it to allow an additional 0.11 goals in that time.The change to Brazil’s oddsThe next step is to see what impact this has on Brazil’s overall chances of victory. Brazil, at full strength, has an SPI offensive rating of 3.12 (placing it No. 1 in the world) and an SPI defensive rating of 0.50 (putting it at No. 3 — at the team level, lower defensive ratings are better).Without Neymar and Silva, Brazil’s offensive rating declines to 2.90 while its defensive rating worsens to 0.61. Both ratings are almost identical to Germany’s, which checks in with a 2.92 offensive rating and a 0.63 defensive rating.But Brazil still has the home-country advantage. If we run the new numbers through the SPI match predictor, we come up with a 65 percent chance of Brazil prevailing against Germany. This is as opposed to a 73 percent chance of doing so with Silva and Neymar in the lineup.Let me pause here to ruminate on the nature of home-country advantage in soccer. Brazil has developed a reputation for “winning ugly” so far in this World Cup. The team was helped by a dubious penalty in its opening match against Croatia. It needed a penalty shootout to get by Chile. And Brazil’s match against Colombia was marred by rough play, including the foul that knocked Neymar out.But winning ugly is part of what home-field advantage is all about. Home teams benefit significantly from officiating decisions — it’s much harder for most referees to hand out a red card or to award a penalty against the home team’s hero. Home teams may also have some advantage in shootouts. Since 2005 — and counting Brazil’s win against Chile — home teams are 7-0 in penalty shootouts in major international competitions. That’s not to say that Brazil has been in its best form (in fact, its SPI rating has declined slightly over the course of the World Cup). But in Brazil, being in pretty good form may be good enough.Should Brazil make it to the final — with Silva returning but still without Neymar — we estimate that it would have a 67 percent chance of beating Argentina (down from 72 percent with Neymar in the lineup). Almost all of that comes from home-field advantage — the teams would be almost level at a neutral site. Brazil would have a 73 percent chance against the Netherlands without Neymar, we estimate, down from 77 percent with him.We can recalculate Brazil’s overall odds of winning the World Cup as well: They’re 45 percent, as opposed to 54 percent with the team at full strength. The other teams benefit from Brazil’s limitations: Argentina’s odds of winning the World Cup rise to 23 percent from 20 percent; Germany’s to 18 percent from 14 percent. The Netherlands gets the least help and goes to 14 percent from 12.5 percent.Betting markets see things a bit differently. The odds available as of early Sunday afternoon have Germany, Brazil and Argentina as co-favorites, each with about a 27 percent chance of winning the World Cup, and the Netherlands just slightly behind at 20 percent.It could be that the markets see a greater impact from the losses of Neymar and Silva than the ones we’ve estimated here. But I suspect that’s only part of the issue — from the start of the tournament, betting markets have consistently been lower on Brazil than SPI and another computer rating system, Elo, have.So far, SPI and Elo have performed well compared to the betting markets. In general, markets are fairly tough to beat, so this could just reflect good luck. International football is particularly hard to rate, whether using subjective or objective methods. The main problems are that the teams don’t play very many competitive matches against one another, and that the composition of the rosters is always changing. SPI tries to address some of those problems, but it isn’t perfect.But there could also be a pro-European bias in the markets. Even though Europe has performed rather poorly in this World Cup, it has the highest-profile club leagues, and it has a higher concentration of wealthy people who can afford to bet on soccer. FIFA’s ranking of international teams, with methodological flaws that may result in overrating European teams, also has some currency in shaping perceptions about international soccer. That may help to explain why betting markets give the European teams a 47 percent chance of winning the World Cup when SPI gives them a 32 percent chance (even after accounting for Brazil’s player absences). It may also help to explain why Brazil’s ugly wins against Colombia and Chile are given less credit than if they had come against, say, Portugal and France.In a sense, the World Cup has come full circle. At the start of the tournament, SPI’s major contentions were that South America was underrated as compared with Europe — and that Brazil’s home-field advantage shouldn’t be overlooked. Brazil still has those things working in its favor, even without Neymar. read more

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What To Make Of The Cavs Disappointing Debut

It was one of the biggest moments in Cleveland sports history. (Seriously!) LeBron James’ first game back as a member of the Cavaliers, wearing that familiar No. 23 jersey. James returned with great fanfare Thursday night, leading his new teammates onto the floor against the New York Knicks. Those same Knicks were fresh off being routed by the Chicago Bulls in their 2014-15 season debut, and the Cavaliers — expected to be the best team in the Eastern Conference (not just by us, either) — were at home, in front of one of the most fired-up crowds imaginable.Piece of cake for the Cavs, right?Not quite. After a hot start (they led the Knicks by 11 early in the second quarter), Cleveland struggled to make shots and to keep New York from doing the same, eventually losing 95-90 in a game they were favored to win by 13.It’s only one game, the first of 82 in what is effectively the longest regular-season in sports. But it’s fair to ask what went wrong, and what it means for the Cavs.In the game, Cleveland had an offensive rating (points scored per 100 possessions) of 108.3 and a defensive rating (points allowed per 100 possessions) of 114.3. Just as a point of comparison, last season’s Knicks scored 109.3 points per 100 possessions and allowed 110.6, but the Real Plus Minus (RPM) ratings of New York’s roster this season would imply a decline of 2 points per 100 possessions on offense from last season, and a decline of 1.5 points/100 on defense. In essence, an average team would have scored around 112 points/100 and allowed 107 points/100 against the Knicks, giving the Cavaliers a ratings shortfall of 4 points on offense and 7 points on defense.Cleveland was expected to be an offensive juggernaut going into the season, so in a sense its performance at that end was the big disappointment. But it’s difficult to imagine a LeBron James-led team not being an offensive powerhouse; a James-led team hasn’t ranked outside the NBA’s Top 8 in offensive rating since 2007-08. (And that’s not even considering the teammates he now has in Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving, among others.) The bigger concern is that Cleveland’s defensive struggles against New York give credence to the most reasonable fears people had about the Cavaliers over the offseason — that their defense would not be up to par.Anderson Varejao is an elite defender by plus/minus metrics, and he logged starter’s minutes for the Cavaliers last night. But although James has a strong defensive reputation as well — he’s made the NBA’s All-Defensive squad in some form (first or second team) every year since 2008-09 — his RPM defense ranked just 24th among small forwards a year ago. Meanwhile, scouts for years have questioned Love’s defense, even though his defensive RPM is surprisingly positive. And Cleveland’s other top minute-earners Thursday night — Irving, Dion Waiters, and Tristan Thompson — are defensive disasters whether you look at the numbers or just watch the games.If ever there was an area where Cleveland’s new super team would struggle, it would be on defense, and Thursday night’s outing against the Knicks only reinforces that fear.Cavaliers coach David Blatt is new to the NBA, and his defensive system is still a work in progress. Two of his team’s biggest issues Thursday night were transition defense and defending spot-up shooters, both areas that can be improved with better defensive cohesion, communication and awareness.It’s unlikely the Cavaliers will play as badly on defense all season as they did against New York. But in a Bayesian sense, it does give us one new data point to reinforce doubts about the defensive quality of the group Cleveland has assembled. read more

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The Most Talented College Football Team In History

Two days after Thanksgiving, the Miami Hurricanes closed out another mediocre regular season with what the Miami Herald called a “dismal downer” of a game. They never led Pitt in the 35-23 defeat, and many UM faithful streamed out of Sun Life Stadium with almost an entire quarter left to play. Miami will appear in a postseason game this month because it has a just technically bowl-eligible 6-6 record (and it’s a well-known university). But the Duck Commander Independence Bowl in Shreveport, Louisiana, is not exactly a destination befitting a program that was once college football royalty.Cycles of boom and bust, however, are nothing new in Coral Gables. This Saturday, ESPN is airing “The U Part 2,” a “30 for 30” by director Billy Corben that follows up on his 2009 documentary about the Hurricanes’ dominant, lawless football program of the 1980s. The sequel explores the process that rebuilt the scandal-ridden team into what would become, statistically, the most talented — if not quite the most dominant — team in college football history.Before the Hurricanes came back from the brink, they were as low as they are now. Miami’s mid-to-late 1990s deterioration reached its nadir at the end of 1997, the program’s first losing season in 18 years. When the final whistle blew on that campaign, Miami had a +3.8 Elo rating,1According to an Elo-like modification of ESPN’s Football Power Index (FPI) developed by FiveThirtyEight’s editor in chief, Nate Silver. which means Miami would have been favored by just 3.8 points against an average FBS team on a neutral field. To use 2014 teams as a comparison, Miami was the equivalent of this year’s Colorado State or Navy teams — a far cry from their dominant squads of the 1980s and early 1990s. (Although this year’s team is even worse, with a rating of +2.0.)This is what happens when a program transgresses enough NCAA rules to deserve its own documentary. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Hurricanes’ violations ranged from a pay-for-play scandal to a UM academic adviser helping players defraud the federal government of Pell Grant money. When the NCAA was finished handing down its penalties, the Hurricanes had been banned from the postseason for a year and stripped of 31 scholarships from 1995 to 1997.For college football teams, scholarships are currency. There’s a clear relationship between a team’s recruiting success and its on-field performance, and in the wake of the sanctions, Miami was unable to recruit as effectively as it had during the early 1990s.2Although it bears mentioning that, even in a relatively “down” recruiting year like 1996, the Hurricanes still hauled in four of the nation’s 100 best recruits.But under Butch Davis, the Hurricanes had figured out how to rebuild. From creative accounting to get around the scholarship limits — Davis persuaded wide receiver Santana Moss (among others) to run track on scholarship for UM while walking onto the football team — to rummaging through the recruiting bin for undervalued prospects, Davis amassed a talent collection better than college football has ever seen before or since. If we judge the players by where they were drafted in the NFL, tally the expected future approximate value for players picked in that slot, add it up for each school by each historical draft class, and assign a weighted sum of the previous four years to each college team-season,3The weights, in this case, are 4-3-2-1, derived from what combination best predicts a team’s FPI rating for the season in question. So, for instance, Miami players accumulated 103 points of AV in the 2002 draft, 86 points in the 2003 draft, 115 points in the 2004 draft and 46 points in the 2005 draft. That means the weighted sum for the 2001 Hurricanes squad is 4 times 103, plus 3 times 86, plus 2 times 115, plus 46 — which equals 946 points, the highest total any college team posted since the first NFL/AFL common draft in 1967. the Miami teams built by Davis and eventually coached by his successor, Larry Coker, are in a universe unto themselves.The single most talented college roster of the past 48 years, according to this measure, was the fabled 2001 Miami Hurricanes, who went 12-0 and won the BCS title while posting one of the best point differentials (+395) of any national champion. Davis-built Miami teams in 2000 and 2002 also rank third and fourth, respectively.The Hurricanes turned their unprecedented collection of talent into a one-loss 2000 team (which media-poll voters thought should have played undefeated Oklahoma for the national championship instead of Florida State, whom Miami had beaten earlier in the season); a historically dominant, unbeaten national champion in 2001; and a 2002 squad whose sole loss came in double overtime of the BCS title game.“You could have taken that 2001 [Hurricanes] team and put them in the NFL,” former Hurricanes safety Antrel Rolle told Corben, “and without a doubt they would have made the playoffs.”It’s probably the closest such a sentiment has ever come to actually being true. Then again, as stacked as the Davis/Coker Hurricanes were in terms of skilled athletes, and as impressive as their 34-game winning streak4Which stretched between Sept. 23, 2000, and Jan. 3, 2003. was, it’s difficult to argue they would have torn up the pros when they barely cracked the top 10 in terms of the highest modified FPI ratings by college teams in the past three decades.Under Davis, the Hurricanes’ Elo rating peaked at +24.3 after they beat Florida, the AP Poll’s No. 7, 37-20 in the 2001 Sugar Bowl — Davis’s last game as UM’s coach before leaving for the NFL’s Cleveland Browns. After Coker took the reins, Miami’s rating would grow to +29.0 after thumping Nebraska 37-14 in the 2002 Rose Bowl, and crested at +30.2 before the 2003 Fiesta Bowl against Ohio State.That mark represents the 10th-highest rating achieved by any team since 1982, but it trails entries from some of college football’s other most celebrated dynasties — including the 1990s Nebraska Cornhuskers, the 2000s USC Trojans, the 2008 Florida Gators, the 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide and even the 1988 Miami Hurricanes.There’s also the tricky matter of how the Hurricanes’ second golden era ended, marred by yet another scandal. While the program was ultimately assessed lighter penalties than it had received in the mid-1990s, in some ways that was due as much to the NCAA’s botched investigation as it was an absolution of Miami’s violations.And now the Hurricanes are back in the muck. But if there’s good news for Miami, Corben’s documentary underscores just how volatile this program has been over the past three decades. Of the top 18 FBS programs (by Elo rating) since 1982, Miami has by far the widest distribution of end-of-year Elo ratings.5In stats parlance, it has the largest standard deviation — 9.5 Elo points.In other words, the team tends to seesaw between greatness and mediocrity. And while life at “The U” has its peaks and valleys, if the story of Corben’s second Miami film is any indication, the next Hurricane dynasty might be just around the corner, no matter how bad things seem in the present. read more

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Shane Battier Says Dukies Always Have Two Brackets

Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. This week’s show (March 11, 2016) was recorded in front of a live audience at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. Neil Paine donned his Stat Man cape once again to lead a lesson about whether box score statistics in the NBA are outdated. Shane Battier, former NBA player and Duke legend, stopped by to talk about March Madness, how he picks a bracket, and why Duke players weren’t obsessed over what seed the team was assigned in the tournament when he was in school. Then we talked to Daryl Morey, the general manager of the Houston Rockets, about whether the Rockets’ struggles this season have pushed him to re-evaluate his team-building strategy. Plus, a significant digit on 17-year-old Mallory Pugh, who is emerging as a star for the U.S. Women’s National Team.Stream the episode by clicking the play button above, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to. Hot Takedown More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

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Florida Gators Linebacker Antonio Morrison Arrested Again

Florida Gators linebacker Antonio Morrison was arrested yet again, this time for allegedly harassing a police dog and resisting arrest.The police report states that Morrison was harassing a police dog, which qualifies as a second-degree misdemeanor according to Florida law. Morrison was suspended from the team and will miss at least the first two games of the season.“I’m extremely disappointed in Antonio Morrison’s decision making,” Florida coach Will Muschamp said in a statement. “He has been suspended from the team and will miss at least two games to begin the season.”The 6-foot-1, 230-pound sophomore told the officers he barked at the dog because the dog barked at him first.

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Are NBA Steals Born of Bad Defense

Although unlikely, it’s delightfully possible that the extra value provided by players who get a lot of steals is mostly just a result of their willingness to try to get them.Finally, if you think that steals come with considerable risk, you still have to account for their predictive value somewhere, and I think your route to a plausible explanation is harder than mine: Perhaps they actually correlate to other (immeasurable) skills so strongly that it overwhelms their individually negative nature? It’s theoretically possible, but it’s not an easy case. My article “The Hidden Value of the NBA Steal” sparked a lot of debate. I’m responding to several comments and questions in four parts. We posted Part 1 on Monday; here is Part 2:My initial article explored how and why steals are underrated as a box score stat. Despite the constant focus on points per game in popular discussion of players, steals are actually a better indicator of value than points. Way better.One of the most common responses to the article was the suggestion that we should consider the amount to which steals are a product of “gambling” on defense. In the comments, reader Kyle Pulek succinctly expressed the concern:I think something that you have to consider is the “risk” of attempting a steal. In a way, steals are valuable but if you try and miss you end up out of position and increasing your opponent’s ability to score on that possession. If you racked up 5 steals a game, it wouldn’t be beneficial if the other 45 possessions that you played you swung and missed and ended up behind the ball.I was a little surprised with the frequency and intensity of this objection, as I didn’t consider it a big issue. Indeed, I raised the same point in Footnote 7 (although I don’t blame anybody for not reading every footnote):Steals come at a cost as well: By gambling on defense, you sometimes give up a better shot if you fail. But, all things considered, they are probably closer to being “free” than points.The reason this didn’t concern me is that the part of the analysis that establishes the value of steals relative to other box score stats is completely oblivious to the costs and benefits of a particular stat; the analysis only cares about the corresponding increase or decrease in the team’s chances of winning.Indirect “with or without you” analyses are meant to avoid the thorny and often intractable causal complexities that lie between a thing and its effect on the bottom line. Of course, this approach has its limitations. For example, we don’t know whether steals predict a player’s impact because steals are more important than other things, or because the type of player who tends to get steals just happens to be better at helping his team win games than a similarly situated player who doesn’t. But we do know that steals predict a player’s impact extremely well, so if we’re concerned with making empirical predictions, they’re something we should pay attention to.This question usually comes from the opposite direction: When discussing the predictive value of steals with statsy-types, one of the most common responses I get is that it’s probably because steals are a defensive stat, and thus one of the only windows into a player’s defensive ability that box score stats provide. One of the more surprising side-findings in my analysis was that steals don’t seem to predict much about defense at all. If there is any contrarian element to my analysis, it is my argument that their value may stem mostly from their irreplaceability instead.Moreover, though some heavy hitters apparently disagree, going for a steal doesn’t immediately strike me as a very bad gamble. A player’s reward is ending his opponent’s possession and getting an even more valuable than normal possession for his team, while his risk is possibly giving up a better shot. Even if some of those shots are layups, the overall difference in expected value of a failed steal attempt from no steal attempt is going to be much smaller than the value of the successful attempt vs. no attempt.The one big thing we don’t know is how many attempts a player needs to get a steal. This “stealing efficiency” may vary considerably from player to player, just as efficiency-focused metrics for other box score stats do. But the observed predictive value of steals suggests that the ratio is not so dire. If anything, I could see it going in the opposite direction: read more

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The Seahawks Are The NFCs Best Team But They Cant Shake The

The NFC West was a lesson in humility for prognosticators last season: The team that FiveThirtyEight’s Elo ratings gave a 60 percent probability of winning the division lost to the one they pegged with a measly 17 percent shot. After that shakeup, we have the West race much closer this season.But that doesn’t mean Elo’s long-running love affair with the Seattle Seahawks is over: They’ve flown in at No. 2 overall in our preseason rankings. Seattle’s somewhat disappointing 10-6 record last year obscured that by season’s end, it was the league’s best team once again (at least, according to the advanced metrics). Russell Wilson was the NFL’s third-best QB, running back Thomas Rawls rose from the third string to become the league’s most valuable rusher and, as usual, the defense ranked among the best in football. Dig beneath the surface-level indicators, and it was mostly business as usual for what’s been the NFL’s most efficient team for about four seasons running.This season, though, the Seahawks will have a difficult schedule to overcome — 10th-hardest in the league, per Elo. And an offseason of attrition did little to address the team’s most glaring weakness in 2015: an offensive line that ranked as the league’s third-most-porous against opposing pass-rushers. So it won’t be shocking if Seattle’s advanced-stats dynasty finally starts to show cracks in 2016. How will your favorite NFL team do this year? See all of our predictions for the 2016 season » To go with our 2016 NFL predictions, FiveThirtyEight is previewing each division. Here, we look at the NFC West. Adding to Seattle’s worries: The defending division champions, the Arizona Cardinals, got better over the offseason. They picked up edge-rusher Chandler Jones, who should improve what had been a weak pass rush in 2015, and they signed guard Evan Mathis to bolster what was already one of the NFL’s top offensive lines. The Cardinals’ biggest concern might be that QB Carson Palmer is 36 years old and is coming off his best season in a decade, a feat of passing efficiency — and health — that might not be repeatable. (And we all saw what happened the last time Arizona had to sift through their QB depth chart in a big game.) Even so, Elo thinks the Cards have a good chance of punching a return ticket to the playoffs, whether by repeating as division champs or grabbing a wild-card berth.It’s unlikely that either of the other members of the NFC West will leapfrog the Seahawks or Cardinals in the standings. The strongest of the two challengers are the Los Angeles Rams, freshly (re-)minted as such after burning their bridges out of St. Louis during the offseason. The potential for improvement is there: The Rams had the league’s youngest roster a season ago — headlined by electrifying rookie RB Todd Gurley. But LA’s roster is also riddled with holes, notably at quarterback. (No. 1 overall draft pick Jared Goff struggled in the preseason and will reportedly start the season third on the team’s depth chart.) Add in what Elo considers the NFL’s most difficult schedule — thanks, NFL International Series! — and the Rams might have trouble making a big Hollywood debut this season.Finally, what do we make of the San Francisco 49ers? On the positive side, new coach Chip Kelly might be able to jump-start San Francisco’s moribund offense the same way he did during his first year in Philly. (Just don’t ask what happened in Years 2 and 3 …) And the team’s young defensive corps might be able to build on last year’s late-season improvement. But the 49ers are up against a brutal schedule — the third-toughest in football — and they didn’t add much else to a roster that finished last season fifth-to-last in Elo. (Also of note: Opening-day starting QB Blaine Gabbert was the worst passer in the NFL over the past five seasons.) Although anything is possible in the NFL, it’s tough to envision San Francisco rising to the top of this division.All told, the battle for first place between Seattle and Arizona should, once again, be the one to watch in the NFC. And with the Minnesota Vikings’ hopes of making the NFC playoffs out of the North damaged by Teddy Bridgewater’s injury, it’s likely that the West’s runner-up will secure a wild-card nod as its consolation prize.VIDEO: How one spurned Rams fan found a new team read more

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Ohio State seeking board approval for athletic facilities facelift

Ohio Stadium and other university athletic facilities could see multi-million dollar renovations. Credit: Lantern File PhotoOn Friday, Ohio State announced its plan for construction on several athletic venues across campus, including Ohio Stadium and the Schottenstein Center.OSU is seeking approval from the Board of Trustees for several multi-million dollar construction and renovation plans. The board is set to meet next week.The university proposed a $39 million dollar facelift to Ohio Stadium. The construction plan includes the laying of new concrete on the C-deck, plus the addition of new suites and boxes for fan seating. The estimated time of completion is set for before the beginning of the 2020 football season.A university spokesman could not comment on whether renovations would add seats to the already 104,944-seat stadium.“Ohio Stadium is the crown jewel of our athletic operations,” said Gene Smith, senior vice president and Wolfe Foundation-endowed athletics director, in the press release. “These renovations will improve the fan experience and continue to make it one of the best facilities in the nation.”Another project awaiting approval from the Board of Trustees is a $31.5 million renovation to the Schottenstein Center. The project would expand the concourse, improve the team store and athletic ticket office, as well as add natural lighting to the venue. Construction is estimated to take a full year and be completed in Feb. 2018. The Covelli Multi-Sport Arena, originally announced last fall to be located on the corner of Ackerman Road and Fred Taylor Drive, is being moved north of Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium, and will be combined with the Jennings Family Wrestling Practice Facility. The Covelli Multi-Sport Arena, originally reported as a $30 million investment, costs north of $49 million with the addition of the Jennings Family Wrestling Practice Facility.OSU women’s and men’s volleyball, wrestling, men’s and women’s gymnastics, and men’s and women’s fencing teams will compete at the 3,700-seat venue, scheduled to be completed in 2019.“Innovation and creative planning helped find a new opportunity for the Covelli Multi-Sport/Jennings Family Wrestling Facility,” said Alex Fischer, Trustee and head of the Master Planning and Facilities Committee, in a press release. “Combining the arena and the practice facility will ultimately realize a cost savings on both projects.”The Biggs Facility that is attached to the Woody Hayes Athletic Center will be replaced with the Schumaker Student-Athlete Development Center. The new facility will include around new athletic offices and a “state-of-the-art” athletic training facility. The project’s cost is estimated at $43 million. There was no date given in the press release for completion of the project.All athletic construction projects are self-funded by the Athletic Department through revenue and fundraising. read more

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Recordsetting womens hockey team to take on winless St Cloud State in

The Ohio State women’s hockey team looks to get back on track and set some records this weekend as it heads to St. Cloud, Minn., to face St. Cloud State. The Buckeyes are 12-12-2 and hoping to better that record against the winless Huskies in a Western Collegiate Hockey Association matchup. “On the ice we’re just trying our best and working hard, and I think our hard work is just paying off and as a result we’re getting success in not only our points but in our team succeeding as well,” said junior forward Natalie Spooner. Several Buckeyes have been leaving their mark on the program and their names in the record books. Spooner and junior forward Laura McIntosh have both joined the 100-point club at OSU this year, albeit in different ways. Spooner has 63 career goals, and McIntosh has 88 career assists. Points are calculated by combining assists and goals. “It’s a good feeling, we don’t really think about it. Neither of us think about it but I mean to get recognized and noticed, it’s an accomplishment,” McIntosh said. “We got to keep pushing forward and see if we can keep going with that.” They are two of only seven Buckeyes ever to reach this mark and they both did it faster than the rest — McIntosh in 80 games and Spooner in 81. “It’s a great honor to be recognized for 100 points, and to be able to get that in my career at Ohio State is an accomplishment,” Spooner said. “Hopefully I can get a few more.” Last weekend against No. 5 Minnesota, Spooner contributed on all three Buckeye goals, with two assists Friday and one goal Saturday. OSU was swept 4-2 and 8-1. Spooner’s goal was her 20th of the season, something she has accomplished in all three of her years at OSU. She is only the second Buckeye to do so, joining forward Jeni Creary, who played from 2002–05. Spooner could move into second place in career goals this weekend. She is just five from tying forward Jana Harrigan, 2003-06. Jeni Creary tops the list with 86 career goals. McIntosh’s 88 assists leave her four behind all-time leader Harrigan. When the Buckeyes last faced the Huskies, Oct. 15–16, McIntosh scored a hat trick to help complete a sweep in Columbus. Freshman goalie Lisa Steffes has also made a splash on the team this year, leading the NCAA with 762 saves and 1550:36 minutes played. Next on the minutes played list is Victoria Vigilanti, a sophomore goalie for Quinnipiac with 1447:31. Only three other goalies have more than 700 saves on the season. Steffes has also won WCHA Rookie of the Week twice this season. “It’s tough as a freshman to come in and be expected to play the number of games she’s had,” coach Jackie Barto said. “I think she’s learned a lot this year and hoping for her to have a good rebound after Saturday night.” Steffes allowed six goals against Minnesota on Saturday but hopes to bounce back against a struggling St. Cloud State squad that is 0-24-1 and has been shut out in its last two games. The series begins at 2 p.m. Friday and continues at 1 p.m. Saturday at the National Hockey Center. “We’ve had a good week of practice; energy has been good,” Barto said. “We talked about keeping the game a little bit simpler, and the girls have done that this week. Our captains have done a great job of leading, of setting the example.” read more

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Intense workouts might cause players to lose their cookies

To Sugar Bowl champions, it’s never too early for football. Spring practice for the Ohio State football team kicked off Monday with players going through conditioning drills starting at 6 a.m. all week, but quarterback Terrelle Pryor was limited while sporting a protective boot as he recovers from surgery on his right foot. Director of football performance Eric Lichter said the early morning practices are meant to cap off what he said was an impressive winter conditioning program for the Buckeyes. Winter training is meant to focus on individual performances in areas such as bench press, broad jump and vertical jump. Mandatory workouts began at the end of January, Lichter said, three weeks after the 31-26 Sugar Bowl win against Arkansas. The program lasted four weeks, concluding with the coaching and training staffs testing the players individually to measure their improvement in those areas. Monday’s practice started drills that are meant to unify the players. “This is more of the team coming together and working on team togetherness and team toughness and kind of building that bond that gets you through tough times,” Lichter said. Now, the team is experiencing the type of conditioning rigors that require trash cans on the field, just in case any of the players lose their “cookies,” an energetic Tressel said as Monday’s practice concluded. Lichter said he was excited about the performances of the new freshmen recruits who have come to work with the team early. Tight end Jeff Heuerman, safety Jeremy Cash, linebacker Ryan Shazier, defensive tackle Joel Hale and quarterback Braxton Miller enrolled at OSU for Winter Quarter to get a head start on preparing for another BCS run next fall. “Really, really impressed with those guys,” Lichter said, “especially considering they’re really seniors in high school and they’re up here competing … hanging with our guys, our veterans.” Former Buckeye defensive lineman Cameron Heyward has been at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center working out and has been a welcomed veteran voice to a team that’s much younger than last year’s squad. “It was good to have Cam around,” Lichter said. “He’s a part of what I consider the best senior class we’ve had here. … Cam will just be a great leader and someone to look to for these young D-linemen and everyone on the team.” Heyward is preparing to take part in OSU’s pro day with former linebacker Brian Rolle, wide receiver Dane Sanzenbacher, cornerback Chimdi Chekwa, guard Justin Boren, defensive back Jermale Hines, linebacker Ross Homan, running back Brandon Saine and cornerback Devon Torrence. NFL scouts will be on hand to evaluate the outgoing Buckeyes on Friday at the WHAC. Lichter expects representatives from all 32 NFL teams to be there. read more

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Denver Broncos select former OSU tight end Jeff Heuerman in NFL draft

Then-junior tight end Jeff Heuerman (86) is brought down during the Big Ten Championship Game against Michigan State Dec. 7, 2013 at Lucas Oil Stadium. OSU lost, 34-24.Credit: Lantern file photoJeff Heuerman became the second former OSU player drafted when the Denver Broncos selected him with the 92nd pick in the third round of the 2015 NFL draft.The tight end enjoyed a breakout 2013 campaign that included a team-best 17.9 yards per reception and four touchdowns. He finished his junior year with 26 receptions for 466 yards.The Naples, Fla., native was unable to replicate that success in his senior year, as he was hampered by foot injuries throughout the season. He finished the year with 17 receptions for 207 yards and two scores but did not record a reception in any of OSU’s three postseason games.Heuerman was named to the second-team All-Big Ten for his senior campaign. The tight end commenced his OSU career with 52 catches for 792 yards and seven scores.Denver lost tight end Julius Thomas in free agency during the offseason. Heuerman will join Owen Daniels and Virgil Green as tight ends for the Broncos.Denver is scheduled to open the 2015-16 season against the Baltimore Ravens on Sept. 13 at 4:25 p.m. read more

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Analysis Taking an early positionbyposition look at the 2018 Ohio State defense

From left to right: redshirt freshman linebacker Tuf Borland (32), freshman defensive end Chase Young (2) and sophomore defensive lineman Robert Landers (67) run onto the field during the second quarter at the at the OSU-Maryland game on Oct. 7. Credit: Ris Twigg | Assistant Photo EditorHere is a position-by-position breakdown of Ohio State’s defense in 2018. The years provided by the players indicates grade in the 2017 season. Defensive tackleGraduating: Michael Hill, Tracy SprinkleReturners: Dre’Mont Jones, Robert Landers, Jashon Cornell, DaVon Hamilton, Haskell Garrett, Malik Barrow, Jerron CageAdditions: Taron Vincent, Antwuan Jackson Jr., Tommy TogiaiThe situation: Redshirt seniors Michael Hill and Tracy Sprinkle will graduate, leaving a hole in the middle of Ohio State’s defensive line. But that crack will enlarge if redshirt sophomore Dre’Mont Jones leaves early for the NFL draft and the Buckeyes are forced to rely on less experienced linemen. Redshirt sophomores Robert Landers, Jashon Cornell and DaVon Hamilton have played substantial snaps, but none has made an impact similar to that of Jones. They will be joined by freshman Haskell Garrett, a former highly rated prospect, who could earn an increase in snaps and push for a starting position. Redshirt freshman Malik Barrow suffered a torn ACL and missed the 2017 season. Freshman Jerron Cage has not played much outside of special teams. Transfer Antwuan Jackson Jr. offers Ohio State possibly its most intriguing option, with the talented junior-college product having two years of collegiate experience. Five-star prospect Taron Vincent could push for early playing time. Projected starters: Robert Landers, Dre’Mont JonesThe Reasoning: Landers served Ohio State well as a rotation piece in 2017 and deserves a starting role next season with the departures of Sprinkle. He offers a unique blend of quickness at a defensive line position known for size and girth. Jones would retain a starting spot if he decides to return and work on improving his pass-rush skills. Jackson will push for a starting opportunity and has the talent to earn the spot.Ohio State defensive lineman Nick Bosa (97) celebrates after taking down USC’s quarterback in the third quarter of the 2017 Cotton Bowl against University of Southern California on Dec. 29 in AT&T Stadium in Arlington, TX. Ohio State won 24-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorDefensive endGraduating: Tyquan Lewis, Jalyn HolmesReturners: Sam Hubbard, Nick Bosa, Chase Young, Jonathon CooperAdditions: Alex WilliamsThe situation: This season, Ohio State’s depth has been its biggest strength at defensive end. That will not be the case next year because redshirt senior Tyquan Lewis and senior Jalyn Holmes will graduate and redshirt junior Sam Hubbard is likely to declare early for the 2018 NFL Draft. However, the Buckeyes will not experience any dearth of talent at the position. Sophomore Nick Bosa will return and remain as a starter, but will play many more snaps next season due to the NFL-bound defensive ends. Freshman Chase Young, a former five-star prospect who looks more like an NFL player than a freshman, has earned first-team snaps this season and has an opportunity to win a starting spot next year. Redshirt freshman Jonathon Cooper was lost in the shuffle due to Ohio State’s loaded upper class of defensive ends and Young’s hype, but the former four-star Ohioan will be expected to rotate with the returners on the line. Earlier in the season, defensive line coach Larry Johnson said he did not like playing true freshmen in disadvantageous situations. That might not be an option in 2018, with Ohio State likely having just three nonfreshman defensive ends. Alex Williams and, potentially, another 2018 defensive end recruit will add to the minimal depth.Projected starters: Nick Bosa, Chase YoungThe Reasoning: Bosa and Young, both former five-star prospects, have lived up to their billing, but have yet to bear the workload of a full starter. Next season, they are likely to be the starters and will have an opportunity to cause havoc in opposing backfields. The potential loss of three starters will take its toll on the depth, and Cooper will be the lone defensive end available to spell Bosa and Young.Ohio State freshman linebacker Baron Browning (5) attempts to stop a Scarlet Knight in the fourth quarter against Rutgers on Sep. 30. Ohio State won 56-0. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorLinebackerGraduating: Chris Worley, Zach TurnureReturners: Jerome Baker, Dante Booker, Malik Harrison, Tuf Borland, Baron Browning, Pete Werner, Justin Hilliard, Keandre Jones, Nick ConnerAdditions: Teradja Mitchell, Dallas Gant, K’Vaughan PopeThe situation: Redshirt senior Chris Worley will graduate, which means Ohio State is losing a starting linebacker and leader of the unit for the second year in a row. Junior Jerome Baker also stands a good chance to exit early for the NFL draft, meaning the Buckeyes will be left with two vacancies at linebacker. Redshirt freshman Tuf Borland started for the second half of the season and has a good shot to open the season at the starter in the middle. Redshirt junior Dante Booker started the majority of the early season, but, once again, was injured and lost his spot. Sophomore Malik Harrison has played a considerable amount of snaps and the athletic linebacker could slide into a starting position. Freshman Baron Browning, a former five-star prospect, is one of Ohio State’s most physically gifted linebackers. Freshman Pete Werner garnered praise from Meyer for his special teams plays, but the first-year player did not see many snaps on defense. Redshirt sophomore Justin Hilliard and sophomore Keandre Jones will be in the mix for increased playing time, but both mainly played special teams. Redshirt sophomore Nick Conner has dealt with a multitude of injuries and has not played this season. The Buckeyes will add a talented group of linebackers, led by Teradja Mitchell, but none are likely to earn consequential reps.Projected starters: Baron Browning, Tuf Borland, Malik HarrisonThe Reasoning: The athleticism of potential first-year starters Browning and Harrison, combined with Borland, might be too much for Ohio State to pass up. Harrison has the inside track to earn a starting position considering the important snaps he has played this year, but Browning will have to beat out a multitude of talented players. Browning earned compliments from defensive coordinator Greg Schiano and teammates for his bowl practice showings. Ohio State sophomore cornerback Kendall Sheffield (8) takes down a Badger in the third quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorCornerbackGraduating: Denzel Ward (NFL draft early entrant) Returners: Damon Arnette, Kendall Sheffield, Jeffrey Okudah, Shaun Wade, Amir Riep, Marcus WilliamsonAdditions: Sevyn Banks, Tyreke JohnsonThe situation: With junior Denzel Ward becoming an early entrant into the 2018 NFL Draft, Ohio State will likely enter next season with a similar crop of cornerbacks minus this year’s best. The Buckeyes will count on major offseason improvements from redshirt sophomores Kendall Sheffield and Damon Arnette, both of whom had shaky 2017 seasons. A sizable group of current freshmen will push them for playing time. Former five-star Jeffrey Okudah played ample snaps and fellow former five-star Shaun Wade has a shot to earn more playing time after recovering from an abdominal injury. Amir Riep and Marcus Williamson have not played much outside of special teams, but each could enter the rotation next year. Incoming recruits Sevyn Banks and Tyreke Johnson are unlikely to play much.Projected starters: Kendall Sheffield, Jeffrey Okudah, Damon ArnetteThe Reasoning: Given the physique and athleticism of Sheffield and Okudah, Ohio State will be unable to keep them off the field. They could cover the outside while Arnette covers in the slot. Though Arnette has struggled with the responsibility, he will be in his third season as a key contributor and must play at a higher level in 2018.Sophomore safety Jordan Fuller (4) awaits the snap during the second quarter at the OSU-Maryland game on Oct. 7. Credit: Ris Twigg | Assistant Photo EditorSafetyGraduating: Erick Smith, Damon Webb (starter)Returners: Jordan Fuller, Isaiah Pryor, Wayne Davis, Jahsen Wint, Brendon WhiteAdditions: Josh Proctor, Marcus HookerThe situation: Senior Damon Webb, a two-year starter, and senior Erick Smith, who began the season as a starter but missed multiple games for undisclosed reasons and relinquished his starting position, will graduate. Sophomore Jordan Fuller will remain a starter for the second year. Freshman Isaiah Pryor was Webb’s backup since the opening week of the season. Redshirt freshman Wayne Davis was listed as Fuller’s backup while Smith was suspended, but has not played much other than on special teams. Redshirt freshman Jahsen Wint also has not seen much playing time on defense. Freshman Brendon White has played multiple positions since arriving at Ohio State in the spring, but has been with the safeties since fall camp. He is a gifted athlete and will find snaps at some point, no matter what position he ends up playing. Four-star Josh Proctor have a chance to earn early playing time, but must first make an impact on special teams. Though Marcus Hooker, younger brother of former Buckeye safety Malik Hooker, is listed as a cornerback, he will to play safety in college and might redshirt.Projected starters: Jordan Fuller, Isaiah PryorThe Reasoning: Fuller will retain his spot as a starter and Pryor will likely slide into Webb’s starting spot due to lesser competition at the position. Fuller impressed in his first season as a starter and could enter 2018 as one of Ohio State’s most talented defensive players. Opposite Fuller, Pryor has the upper hand, but that position battle could go through spring camp and into the fall without a starter named.Check out the preview of Ohio State’s offense. read more

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Mens Soccer Ohio State falls to Cleveland State 20 on Connor Senn

Ohio State then-freshman forward Joshua Jackson-Ketchup (9) takes the ball downfield during the Ohio State- BGSU game on Sep. 22. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignThere is no doubt the Ohio State men’s soccer team came out playing to win their match against Cleveland State on Friday. The opening 15 minutes provided a look at an aggressive Buckeye squad, perhaps more aggressive than it has been all season long. They made passes they normally would not have tried to make in earlier matches. Redshirt senior midfielder Brady Blackwell split his way through two defenders in a spot where he may have elected to pull up and wait for something to develop alongside him. However, even with the increased intensity and aggressiveness, Ohio State (1-8-2) still came up short, falling to Cleveland State (3-5-1) 2-0 on Friday night. Ohio State head coach Brian Maisonneuve cited the fact that his team outshot Cleveland State and created more corner kicks than their opponents, yet said he was troubled by the fact that they are finding ways to lose games.“I mean, right now, you look at the stats and I think we outshot them 10-5, we out corner kicked them 4-1 and you know right now it’s unfortunate because sometimes we’re finding ways to lose games,” Maisonneuve said.For the next 15 minutes, the game seemed to calm down some, a chance here and look there, but nothing too threatening to either goalkeeper. Ohio State redshirt junior goalkeeper Parker Siegfried plucked a contested pass, bound for the head of a Cleveland State attacker, out of the air.On the other end, Ohio State senior forward Michael Prosuk saw his free kick glide just over the crossbar. But the rest of the game did not go to plan for the Buckeyes. “That is part of the building process but eventually that is kind of a learned behavior is how you find ways to win games and we’re doing the opposite right now,” Maisonneuve said. “So, I mean, we’ve got to focus on that and really find ways to pull these out.”Cleveland State opened the scoring in the 38th minute when junior midfielder/forward Lawrence Karpeh ripped home a blistering shot from over 30 yards out.The second half rolled around and the Vikings added to their lead. A turnover in the midfield lead to a three on two fast break opportunity for the Vikings in the 59th minute and sophomore midfielder/forward Zach Kluever finished the job to make it 2-0 and provide the dagger for Cleveland State.“At the end of the day we’ve got to come out fighting and we may be having probably the roughest start ever, you know, here at Ohio State but it’s all about mentality and how we, you know, bounce back,” sophomore forward Joshua Jackson-Ketchup said. That’s all that matters and if we keep grinding then things will turn around and we’ve just got to look at the bigger picture and look at the future really.”The Buckeyes (1-8-2, 0-3-1) travel to Syracuse to take on the Orange on Monday. read more

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Thirteenyearold died just seconds after being offered ride in £1m Ferrari

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Damaged fence posts and flowers at the scene of the incident The 37-year-old man and teenage boy were travelling in the rare red Ferrari F50 – which is capable of reaching 201mphCredit:Solent News & Photo Agency The 13-year-old boy who was killed when the Ferrari F50 he was travelling in crashed had been offered the ride just seconds before, it has been revealed. Alexander Worth, of Kings Worthy, Hampshire, is believed to have asked for a picture of the supercar but business car owner Matt Cobden offered to take him for a ride instead. Less than a minute later, the vehicle had crashed on an access road on Hook Road, North Warnborough.The Ferrari, in which the teenager was a passenger, collided with wooden fence posts on the road that leads to Newlyns and Lodge Farms.Matt Cobden, 37, from Surrey, who was driving, was taken to North Hampshire Hospital with serious injuries, Hampshire Constabulary said. “The kid saw the F50 there there and asked the garage owner to sit in it.”He replied that he could do one better and take him for a drive.”They got less than a minute away before the mother, still waiting at the garage, heard a crash.”She was the first on the scene and tried to resuscitate her son to no avail.”The teenager’s family chose not to comment on the death of their 13-year-old son.A spokesman for Hampshire Constabulary added: “Alexander Worth, 13, of Kings Worthy, was in a Ferrari F50 when it was involved in a single vehicle collision on the access road on Hook Road, at 8.45pm.”Sadly, Alexander suffered life-threatening injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene.”Investigations into the collision are continuing and any witnesses are asked to contact the Serious Collision Investigation Team based in Eastleigh.”center_img Damaged fence posts and flowers at the scene of the incidentCredit:Solent News & Photo Agency Alexander’s mother is reported to have tried to resuscitate her son after pulling him from the wrecked vehicle, but paramedics declared him dead at the scene as soon as they arrived on Tuesday night.Mr Hobden, who owns Toy Stor-age, a luxury car storage firm in Hook, Hants., was rushed to hospital after he sustained serious wounds in the fatal crash.Writing on a specialist car forum the following day, one web user said: “It was my friend’s son.”As far as I know at the moment, the mother and child were waiting at a car dealership where their friend was delivering some batteries. The 37-year-old man and teenage boy were travelling in the rare red Ferrari F50 - which is capable of reaching 201mphlast_img read more

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BBC should not attempt Great British Bake Off copycat show says new Corporation

first_imgSir David Clementi is a former deputy governor of the Bank of EnglandCredit:World First To put an absolutely similar programme on would be very disappointingSir David Clementi Asked if he thought it would be wrong to introduce a “copycat” version of Bake Off, which ran on the BBC for seven series, he said: “Yes, if it was precisely similar, but I don’t think that’s intended.”Describing the programme, which saw a selection of amateur bakers put through their culinary paces by Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood, as a “great show”, he said: “It would need to be a different format.”To put an absolutely similar programme on would be very disappointing.”Sir David added his admiration for Bake Off contestant-turned-television chef Nadiya Hussain’s work with the BBC and wished Channel 4 “good luck” developing the show.The former deputy governor of the Bank of England was also quizzed on his plans to build “distinctiveness” into the channel’s programming. Sir David Clementi is a former deputy governor of the Bank of England While praising original dramas such as Sherlock and Line Of Duty, he showed a hint of scepticism about repetitive reality shows.Commenting on the latest reality singing contest, Let It Shine, airing in BBC One’s prime Saturday evening slot, he said: “It isn’t a new concept, but it’s quite warm-hearted.”We need to allow it a few more Saturdays before making a judgment and see how Gary (Barlow) brings it together.”Sir David added that he was “not sad” the BBC had lost rival singing show The Voice to ITV. Sir David Clementi has said he would be “disappointed” to see the BBC attempt to reproduce The Great British Bake Off after losing the popular cookery show to Channel 4.The new chairman of the corporation’s unitary board, which replaces the BBC Trust, said he was a fan of the show but would not like to see it recreated.Speaking at a hearing before his official appointment to the new role on Tuesday, he gave his views on BBC programming. Show more Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. But, while he described himself as a BBC “enthusiast” and an expert on its programming between 8pm and 11pm, he made clear that the new board will not play a part in individual programming and commissioning decisions.He said the government organisation’s role would be to oversee general schedules and balance across the channels.Entering the position at a difficult financial time for the BBC, he said he planned a five-year cost-saving plan with an emphasis on spreading products overseas, as well as improving “originality, creativity and risk-taking” in content.”We are coming under increasing competition from independent producers,” he said.”The Graham Norton Show and Poldark, for example, are made by ITV Studios. So we can only judge the quality of BBC content when we see it being played on other channels.”Adding that a fundamental role for the BBC is to reflect Britain as a whole, he said: “If we don’t get the public purpose right, then there is no future.”last_img read more

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I dont want to die Linda Nolan reveals she is really scared

first_imgI want to grow old with my family. There is so much I want to doLinda Nolan Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Linda Nolan has said she is “really scared” and “doesn’t want to die” after being diagnosed with incurable cancer.The former singer and performer, 58, who found fame with The Nolans in the Seventies, had been clear after being treated in 2007 for breast cancer.But it was revealed this week she had been diagnosed with the illness, which doctors have said is incurable but treatable, after falling on the stairs around three weeks ago. In an interview with the Daily Mirror, Nolan said: “I don’t want to die. All my little nieces and nephews, my step-children and step-grandchildren; they are my life now because I never had children.”And when they come in to the hospital to visit me, I think, ‘Oh my God, I wanted to see you get married or see you with your first boyfriend’.”And I want to grow old with my family. There is so much I want to do. I have to be positive and make sure I do. I am really scared.”Nolan said she hopes to live up to another 20 years, adding: “I’m not going to be dying from cancer, I’m going to be living with cancer if that’s what I have to do.” On Monday, her sister Coleen revealed on Loose Women that Linda, pictured in 2014, had been diagnosed with secondary cancerCredit: Steve Meddle/ITV/REXcenter_img “It’s taken her 10 years to finally get her life back and then it goes, ‘Whack. Here you go, now face this.'”Nolan lost her sister Bernie to breast cancer in 2013. On Monday, her sister Coleen revealed on Loose Women that Linda, pictured in 2014, had been diagnosed with secondary cancer She also revealed how her three great-nieces helped her get to hospital when she fell before being diagnosed.On Monday, her sister Coleen revealed on Loose Women that Linda had been diagnosed with secondary cancer and had also broken her hip in the fall.She described the news as “earth-shattering”.Fighting back tears, she added: “I went through such terrible anger. I was angry at the world, angry at cancer, angry for her. I just thought, ‘It’s so unfair. She’s just got it all together.’last_img read more

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Red Cross shows astonishing scale of Grenfell donations

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The Red Cross is giving the best of the new clothes to the survivors of the fire to choose from.Everything else will be labelled as ‘Shop for Grenfell’ and sold in British Red Cross shops across the UK.The money will go to the London Fire Relief Fund.This fund has now raised £3.2m since the fire.The Red Cross said: “Every family that lost someone in the Grenfell Tower fire is to receive £20,000. Those seriously injured will receive £10,000 and there will be a further £10,000 fresh start grant to every family that has been made homeless.”When asked where the money was going, the organisation told The Telegraph: “We will focus on helping those affected to alleviate their immediate suffering and to ensure that victims and their families do not face short-term financial difficulties. This may include cash grants for those who have lost their homes or been injured, bereaved or traumatised by this tragedy, to alleviate their immediate suffering and to ensure that victims and their families do not face short-term financial difficulties. We will also be supporting community organisations who can distribute the funds.” The public has donated three football pitches worth of goods to the Grenfell survivors.The Red Cross has shown the astonishing scale of the public support in a video. Tonnes of clothes and other items have been donated to help people affected by the London fire.Kensington Council has asked people to stop donating items, and to instead donate money, as they have so much.The council has stored more than 40,000 boxes of donations in a warehouse, which is the equivalent of more than 100 lorry loads, or three football pitches.last_img read more

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Ban on knives being delivered to shoppers doors proposed by Government

first_imgOnline shoppers will have to collect knives in person rather than having them delivered to their homes under Government proposals to clamp down on sales to children and teenagers.It is already an offence to sell knives to under-18s but the planned measures would mean they cannot be delivered to private property, such as the buyer’s home.Ministers say this would make it harder for under-age purchases to go undetected following warnings online age verification checks can be sidestepped.Under the plans anyone who bought a knife on the internet would be required to collect it at a store or another physical premises. Announcing her intention to tighten the law, Home Secretary Amber Rudd said: “We are announcing new measures to combat knife crime and the devastating impact it has on families, individuals and communities.”We are going to be consulting on new legislation so that people can’t buy knives online without having their identity checked.”At the moment you have to do it by the click of a button. What we are proposing is that if you want to buy a knife online it has to be collected from a place where you have to show your ID.”We have evidence that young people have been able to buy knives without verifying their ID and I want to stop that.”She said it was a “perfectly reasonable” step to take, pointing to figures indicating that almost three-quarters of online retailers which should carry out age verification checks are not doing so.”The online retailers may say ‘well, we ask people whether they are over or under 18’, and that’s just not good enough because we have the evidence that people have been able to get them delivered to their home,” Ms Rudd said. Retailers would be responsible for checking the age of all buyers by asking for them to show ID such as a passport or driving licence.Arrangements for how online sellers without physical stores can comply will be considered as part of a consultation to be launched later this year.It is illegal to sell a blade of more than three inches (7.62cm) to anyone under 18 – but reports have suggested safety checks can be circumvented.Calls for action on internet sales intensified last year after a court heard a knife used in the fatal stabbing of Bailey Gwynne, an Aberdeen schoolboy, was purchased online. Officers say youths are keeping blades on them for reasons including “status” and self-protection, as well as crime. Bailey Gwynne Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Bailey’s killer, a 16-year-old youth who cannot be named for legal reasons, denied murder and was convicted of the lesser charge of culpable homicide. Bailey Gwynne was stabbed to deathCredit:PA  In one case an under-18 was able to get a knife by having it delivered to their mother’s shed, the Home Secretary added.The new drive will also aim to close off a loophole that means police can be powerless to act if they discover knives in someone’s home.A ban on the possession of outlawed weapons such as zombie knives and knuckledusters on private property would mean officers can seize them and make arrests.Any restrictions will be drawn up so that those who keep weapons for a legitimate purpose, such as cultural items or antiques, are not penalised.The consultation will also seek views on whether the offence of possessing a knife in a public place and school premises should be extended to also include the grounds of other educational establishments, such as higher education institutions.A slew of official data has underlined mounting concerns over rising levels of knife crime.The most recent national crime figures showed the majority of police forces – 33 out of 44 – registered a rise in offences involving knives and sharp instruments last year.Police have warned of a shift which has seen the proportion of youngsters carrying knives who are linked to gangs fall. Amber Rudd  The Home Secretary Amber Rudd, who is consulting on a change in the law, was shown a collection of knives recovered by the police in London Credit:Stefan Rousseau /PAlast_img read more

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Guernsey could become first place in British Isles to have a suicide

first_imgHe added: “I have personal experience of my father who died nine years ago. His death from cardiovascular disease was very distressing…It was not a comfortable death and it was also not the death that he would have chosen for himself had he had the choice.”At the forefront of proposals will be measures to protect the vulnerable, while the cost is likely to be covered by the island’s health service for residents, it was reported. Doctors’ rights to object to requests will also likely be considered.Assisted dying is illegal in the UK under the Suicide Act of 1961, and carries a sentence of up to 14 years prison.However if it is legalised, it would allow a person the choice to control their death if they decide their suffering is unbearable. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. On average, a British resident travels to Switzerland every eight days for an assisted death, usually at the Zurich clinic of Dignitas at a cost of £10,000.Campaigners, including Dignity in Dying, have produced research suggesting 82 per cent of the public were in favour of assisted dying being legalised.Guernsey previously tried to legalise it in 2002, but plans were dismissed.While it could open the door to the possibility of mainland nationals travelling to Guernsey, some believe that if passed the law should be limited to local residents only. Gavin St Pier, the island’s top politician, told the Mirror he is backing the proposal for terminally-ill adults who are mentally competent and have been given six months or less to live.He said: “This is about giving people choice and a sense that they have some control themselves, rather than being frightened, out of control and in the hands of others. That for me is why it is such an important issue.” Guernsey could become the first place in the British Isles to have a suicide clinic under proposals being put to a vote on the island in May.If pushed through by politicians, it would likely trigger an 18-month consultation period to pull together a legal framework to make the changes.However, sources have told the Mirror that the plans look likely to get the green light. If so, it could open up a pathway for UK mainland residents to travel to Guernsey to end their life if they so choose.Campaigners in the UK who have long sought a change in the law to legalise assisted dying are likely to be paying close attention to proceedings in the hope of overhauling the law on the mainland. Currently, patients wishing to end their lives travel to Switzerland, where the practice is legal.Although Guernsey lies within the British Isles in the English channel and its residents hold British passports, it has its own legislative body and has the freedom to pass its own laws.Yet the UK Government has powers to intervene if there are implications for the UK, and the matter will go before the Privy Council. The mainland can also oversee legal changes on immigration and defence matters.last_img read more

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Lindo Wing at St Marys Hospital officially on Royal Baby Watch as

first_imgIt’s official – Royal Baby Watch has begun, with parking restrictions in place outside the Lindo Wing of St Mary’s Hospital in London in preparation for the Duchess of Cambridge to have her third child – now named Prince Louis Arthur Charles.Crowd barriers are set up on the street outside to accommodate the television crews, journalists and photographers who will be present as she goes into labour. The baby is due to be born in mid-to-late April, and The Duchess has recently been seen in Norfolk, shopping in Waitrose.She had her first two children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, at the Lindo Wing, and although there were rumours she may have a home birth this time, it is now clear she will be delivering the third child in the same place as its siblings.By choosing the exclusive hospital wing, she is following in the footsteps of the late Princess Diana, who had both her children, Princes Harry and William, there. Crowd barriers are erected opposite the private Lindo Wing of St Mary's Hospital A parking suspension is seen near to the Lindo Wing of St Mary’s hositalCredit:REUTERS/Peter Nicholls Eager fans, who often gather near the hospital before a Royal Baby is born, will have to wait until the birth to find out the gender of the child; the Duke and Duchess have asked for it to remain a surprise. David Levenson/Getty ImagesDavid Levenson/Getty Images REUTERS/Peter Nicholls  New born Prince William with Diana Princess of Wales and Prince Charles at the Lindo WingCredit:David Levenson/Getty Images The Duchess will be looked after by a team of leading medical professionals during her stay, which will be lead by Alan Farthing, the Queen’s surgeon-gynaecologist, and Guy Thorpe-Beeston, surgeon-gynaecologist to the royal household. Both of them helped to deliver Prince George and Princess Charlotte.In the Lindo Wing, The Duchess will again be given a bespoke experience akin to a five-star hotel with en suite rooms available “providing a modern, homely environment in which to start your new or expanded family life”, the unit’s website states. All meals are freshly prepared in a dedicated kitchen and there is even an afternoon tea service, for parents to celebrate their new arrival, the website suggests. Deluxe rooms and suites are also available.The latest price list, from July last year to March, states that a standard room package, including a one-night stay, costs from £5,900, while a deluxe package is £6,275 – with an extra night priced at more than £1,000 for both options.The price of a suite of two rooms, with one used as a living room, is available on application but five years ago it cost £6,265 for a one-night stay. Crowd barriers are erected opposite the private Lindo Wing of St Mary’s HospitalCredit:DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images With standard and deluxe care packages rising by around £1,000 since the birth of their first child, William and Kate could spend close to £7,500 for a suite.Each room has a satellite TV with major international channels, radio, bedside phone, fridge, free wi-fi and a choice of daily newspapers. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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