JK Adams Awarded the Forest Stewardship Council Chain-of-Custody Certification

first_imgJK Adams Awarded the Forest Stewardship CouncilChain-of-Custody CertificationFirst to Receive this Certificate in the Kitchen Products IndustryDorset, VT – September 22, 2008 – JK Adams was awarded, this week, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Chain-of-Custody certification. The FSC is the leading forestry stewardship system in the world with the mission to ensure forestry practices that are environmentally responsible, socially equitable, and economically viable.”We have been working on obtaining this certification for over a year,” said John Rodrigues, Vice President of J.K. Adams. “The FSC Chain-of-Custody certification allows us to put the FSC label on our products certifying that our products are tracked from the forest where the wood is harvested through the manufacturing process and that each step of the way meets rigorous environmental impact guidelines. We believe that through the FSC we can help create a marketplace that demands well-managed forestry practices.”According to Rodrigues, consumers now have a choice. “It’s like reading the ingredients on a food label – you know what you’re buying and you’re making an educated decision. Because of the FSC labels, consumers can now make knowledgeable purchase decisions when buying wood or paper products. They can purchase products that come from environmentally responsible practices or purchase products from companies that cannot account for the environmental and social impacts of their lumbering.”” We have worked hard to raise the bar and set new standards in our industry, both in terms of design and in environmental practices and are thrilled to be the first in the kitchen products category to receive the FCS Chain-of-Custody certification,” added Malcolm Cooper, President of J.K. Adams.J.K. Adams will debut new products in January 2009 that will all carry the FSC label. These include cutting boards, servers and kitchen accessories.The Forest Stewardship Council, founded in 1993, is an independent, nonprofit organization that promotes the responsible management of the world’s working forests. FSC standards have been applied on more than 170 million acres of actively managed forests in more than 60 countries, and growing steadily. Standards support biodiversity, reduce chemical use, protect streamsides, conserve old growth, ensure protection of high conservation value forests, give stakeholders a voice, and ensure long-term timber supplies.The Forest Stewardship Council reports that forest products account for $260 billion of the annual U.S. economy, placing constant pressure on global forests. With 37 national offices and representation in every major forest producing country, FSC and its partners use FSC standards as an important land conservation tool and a way to differentiate product in the marketplace.For more information about J.K. Adams and its products, call 800-451-6118 or visit www.jkadams.com(link is external). For more information on the FSC, contact, FOREST STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL-US at 202.342.0413 or visit: www.fscus.org(link is external).###last_img read more

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Series of accounting for captives online courses in May

first_img Designation students- this course fulfills an elective course requirement. To register, contact me at angela@iccie.org(link sends e-mail).          ACI recipients- this course fulfills continuing education credits.For further information regarding ICCIE’s ACI Designation Program and further course information please visit our website at www.iccie.org(link is external).        Kate Boucher, ACI      Michael Burdick, ACI            Melissa Hancock            Dan Kusaila Instructors: Kate Boucher, Michael Burdick, Melissa Hancock and Daniel Kusaila  Webconference Dates: May dates, to be posted soon Webconference Time: 2:30- 3:45 p.m. EDT This course is geared toward captive owners, board members and audit committee members, as well as others who are looking for a deeper understanding of the underlying financial reporting components of captive insurance companies. Participants will examine:The accounting standardsImportant internal controlsFinancial statement assertions associated with the significant accounts on the balance sheet and income statement of a captive insurance companyInsurance company income tax issues and FIN 48 View Full Course Description Cost of Course $900 Register Herecenter_img The International Center for Captive Insurance Education has announced a new series of accounting for captives online courses in May called “Accounting for Captives: Interpretation & Management Perspectives.” http://img.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101093164665/cards_profes(link is external)…); background-color: rgb(118, 172, 169); border-top-color: rgb(211, 211, 211); border-right-color: rgb(211, 211, 211); border-bottom-color: rgb(211, 211, 211); border-left-color: rgb(211, 211, 211); border-top-width: 1px; border-right-width: 1px; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-left-width: 1px; border-top-style: dotted; border-right-style: dotted; border-bottom-style: dotted; border-left-style: dotted; “> Newest in ICCIE’s Series of Accounting for Captives Courses: “Accounting for Captives: Interpretation & Management Perspectives” Accounting for Captives: Interpretation and Management Perspectives New Online ICCIE Elective  6 CPE credits available If you have questions, e-mail me at angela@iccie.org(link sends e-mail) or call me at 802-651-9053.  International Center for Captive Insurance Education (ICCIE)last_img read more

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Putney Historical Society begins work on timber frame for new store

first_imgLogging and milling has begun on the post and beam frame of the future Putney General Store. In an empty lot off of Route 5 in Putney, volunteer mill operator Mark Bowen is busy sawing large oak and pine logs donated by Putney land-owners that will become the frame of the new store to be built by the Putney Historical Society.The Historical Society is closing in on its fund raising goal to rebuild the Putney General Store which was destroyed by fire in May of 2008 and again this past November. Leader Distribution Systems and Pepsi Cola, as part of the national Pepsi Refresh Project, have responded to the fund raising effort by contributing a $10,000 grant in support of Putney’s volunteer effort to raise the frame of the store. John Leader, CEO of Leader Distribution Systems, said, “We are thrilled to be able to join the amazing outpouring of support for this undertaking from so many people in the greater Putney community. Rebuilding the Putney store completely meets the Pepsi Refresh Project goal of making neighborhoods across the country better places to live.”This donation is a boost for the Thomas Thompson Trust two-for-one challenge grant that will provide $20,000 toward the rebuilding effort if the Historical Society raises $40,000.While the Putney Historical Society has more money to raise, and is still looking for someone to operate the store once it has been built, members are busy planning a community festival for early summer to celebrate the raising of the timber frame. In the meantime, Mark Bowen and others will keep cutting in preparation for that event.Source: Putney Historical Society. 4.7.2010last_img read more

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Shumlin, lawmakers and businesses unveil Jobs Bill to get Vermonters back to work

first_imgHeavy on food and agriculture, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin and key lawmakers, appearing at Vermont Butter and Cheese Company, today unveiled a comprehensive package of proposals to promote manufacturing, job training, veterans’ employment, value-added agriculture jobs and more to jumpstart Vermont’s economy.‘This is one of the most thorough, broad-reaching proposals to create and support good-paying jobs in Vermont that has been proposed in recent memory,’ Governor Shumlin said. ‘Any one of these proposals would be a step in the right direction toward getting Vermont’s back to work. Taken as a package, this Jobs Bill will stimulate every sector of Vermont’s economy.’The Governor said it was vital that the Agency of Commerce and Community Development partner with the Agriculture Agency and the Department of Public Service and other state agencies and partners to promote everything from marketing to new workforce training.‘The Agriculture sector remains important to our state ‘ without a doubt ‘ and efforts such as Buy Local and the localvore movement, growth in our specialty food sectors, as well as diversification of our farming community will require more promotion and collaboration,’ Gov. Shumlin said.The Governor also highlighted efforts focused on creating and protecting good jobs for Vermont’s veterans and the long-term unemployed.The bill would also stimulate manufacturing jobs, provide extensive job training and internships for young Vermonters, improving access to capital, and support efforts to strengthen healthy downtowns.Governor Shumlin thanked ACCD Secretary Lawrence Miller, Agriculture Secretary Chuck Ross, Public Service Commissioner Elizabeth Miller and Karen Marshall, Chief of Connect VT, as well as everyone else across state government and elsewhere for their hard work to put together the sweeping package of economic proposals.‘These proposals shows an array of economic and community development activities that will help get our veterans and unemployed back to work, enable creative workforce development activities to fill much needed skills, revitalize our communities including our creative economy and value added agriculture as well as help expand existing business while we seek to attract new jobs to Vermont,’ said ACCD Secretary Lawrence Miller.  ‘We believe this array of initiatives shows the Governor’s commitment to vulnerable Vermonters and our important businesses and communities.’ Among the proposals: ·         VETERAN AND LONG TERM UNEMPLOYED INCOME TAX CREDIT. An employer may apply for a tax rebate of up to $2,000 when the employer hires a veteran and up to 1,000 when the employer hires and retains into a new, full-time position, a long term unemployed individual.·         RETURN TO WORK TRAINING PROGRAM. A program to enable unemployed to be trained and gain work experience at an employer while collecting unemployment.·         SEASONAL WORKSHARE. This will allow employers interested in partnering to share workforces during their ‘off’ season.·         ESTABLISH A CREATIVE ECONOMY OFFICE. The Film Commission Advisory Board will advise the office to focus on technology and other portions of the expansive creative economy.·         MENTORING ENTREPRENEURS. Comprised of business leaders committed to devoting their time and knowledge to growing the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.·         VALUE ADDED TRANSITION/DIVERSIFICATION PROGRAM. A new $1 million program at VEDA to help farmers seeking to transition and/or diversify out of conventional agriculture into other forms of agricultural production or value added agriculture.  The program will offer flexible lending terms and funds will come from VEDA’s current farm lending resources.·         FUNDING FOR GAP (GOOD AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES) CERTIFICATION. Establish a matching fund program to help Vermont-grown producers obtain needed equipment and make building modifications to enable them to reach GAP or other food safety certifications (so they can access larger retail markets). ·          ‘MADE IN VERMONT’ Expand Vermont co-branding program to support Vermont’s agricultural sector as well as other Vermont enterprises that are positioned to use and support the Vermont brand.·         ENABLE THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SKILLED MEAT CUTTERS APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM. Expanding opportunities for locally grown foods includes the ability to process locally grown meat products here in Vermont.·         LOCAL FOODS COORDINATOR. State employee to coordinate food buyers, such as schools, state agencies and institutions (colleges and hospitals) with farmers and value added producers in Vermont. ·         FARM TO SCHOOL PROGRAMS. Strategically focus funding to continue the competitive grant program for Farm to School to expand opportunities for Vermont producers to serve these markets and Vermont schools seeking to source locally grown products. ·         ENABLE MARKETING OF CSA SHARES TO STATE EMPLOYEES. Authorize the marketing of CSA’s in state office buildings so state employees are aware of opportunities to buy locally grown products and support local farmers. ·         STATEWIDE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM. Create a statewide internship program that links college and high school student with Vermont employers.·         GOVERNOR’S CAREER READINESS CERTIFICATE. Expanding an existing successful program.·         (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) STEM TAX CREDIT. A Vermont company that hires a qualified recent grad in this area will be able to claim 50 percent of expenditures (up to $5,000 a year, per new hire) that go toward relieving a new hire’s debt load, and credit on their corporate income tax. The new hire will be eligible to receive a $5,000 income tax credit every year for five years.·         LARGE ANIMAL VETERINARIAN LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM. Establish a loan repayment program to target these needed resources in under-served regions.·         ENABLE DEVELOPERS TO APPLY FOR AND RECEIVE DESIGNATION AND INCENTIVES UNDER THE VERMONT NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM·         MAXIMIZE PRIVATE INVESTMENT THROUGH THE FEDERAL NEW MARKET TAX CREDIT PROGRAM. Education of RDCs and other development entities in NMTC-eligible areas, particularly in the Northeast Kingdom. With partners, conduct outreach to in and out-of-state developers and investors to invest in or expand facilities in eligible areas.·         REENERGIZE OUR INDUSTRIAL PARKS for this and the next century.·         VERMONT BUSINESS PARTNER INCENTIVES. This would allow a Vermont company to earn a tax credit if they bring a vendor, supplier or customer to Vermont that will create jobs. ·         EXPANSION OF EB5 PROGRAM to new sectors and enable program growth.·         THE VEPC INITIATIVE. Reauthorize VT Economic Growth Incentive (VEGI) and expansion of the program. ·         VERMONT TRAINING PROGRAM. Add 5% to the health care allowance when considering the wages at the end of training for both new hires and incumbent workers.·         INCREASE SLAUGHTERHOUSE CAPACITY IN VERMONT·         VAAFM TRAVEL FUNDS FOR FEDERAL FARM BILL. Funds will be made available to allow the Vermont Agency of Agriculture to be involved regionally in the formation, interaction and movement toward passage of the Federal Farm Bill. ·         MERCHANT BANKING. Improve funding for Vermont-scale businesses.·         LONG-RANGE ECONOMIC PLANNING. After developing a short term strategy, work on a long-term set of goals for the Vermont economy.·         MONITORING THE FARM TO PLATE PLAN.·         VERMONT SUSTAINABLE JOBS FUND. This will enable VSJF to apply Community Development Fund Institution (CDFI) designation and there by receive up to $2million in capitalization for the Flexible Capital Fund ‘ a near equity, patient, mezzanine level financing fund for growth stage businesses in the VSJF’s market sectors.  Source: Shumlin’s office. 2.3.2011last_img read more

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Vermont’s unemployment rate drops again to 5.3 percent

first_imgVermont’s unemployment rate for November fell three-tenths of a point to 5.3 percent, as both the labor force and total employment grew over both the October levels and over November 2010. This is the lowest rate since April, before the first of two floods hit the state. It’s also the fewest number of unemployed since November 2008, just as the national recession was beginning.Vermont Labor Force StatisticsSeasonally Adjusted Table B.  States with statistically significant unemployment rate changesfrom October 2011 to November 2011, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————-                                |          Rate         |                                               |———–|———–| Over-the-month             State              |  October  |  November | rate change(p)                                |    2011   |  2011(p)  |               ————————————————————————-Alabama ……………………|     9.3   |     8.7   |      -0.6     Arkansas …………………..|     8.2   |     8.0   |       -.2     California …………………|    11.7   |    11.3   |       -.4     Connecticut ………………..|     8.7   |     8.4   |       -.3     Delaware …………………..|     7.9   |     7.6   |       -.3     District of Columbia ………..|    11.0   |    10.6   |       -.4     Florida ……………………|    10.4   |    10.0   |       -.4     Georgia ……………………|    10.2   |     9.9   |       -.3     Idaho ……………………..|     8.8   |     8.5   |       -.3     Iowa ………………………|     6.0   |     5.7   |       -.3                                     |           |           |               Kansas …………………….|     6.7   |     6.5   |       -.2     Maine ……………………..|     7.3   |     7.0   |       -.3     Maryland …………………..|     7.2   |     6.9   |       -.3     Massachusetts ………………|     7.3   |     7.0   |       -.3     Michigan …………………..|    10.6   |     9.8   |       -.8     Minnesota ………………….|     6.5   |     5.9   |       -.6     Missouri …………………..|     8.5   |     8.2   |       -.3     Montana ……………………|     7.6   |     7.1   |       -.5     North Carolina ……………..|    10.4   |    10.0   |       -.4     Ohio ………………………|     9.0   |     8.5   |       -.5                                     |           |           |               Oregon …………………….|     9.5   |     9.1   |       -.4     Pennsylvania ……………….|     8.1   |     7.9   |       -.2     South Carolina ……………..|    10.5   |     9.9   |       -.6     South Dakota ……………….|     4.5   |     4.3   |       -.2     Tennessee ………………….|     9.5   |     9.1   |       -.4     Texas ……………………..|     8.4   |     8.1   |       -.3     Utah ………………………|     7.0   |     6.4   |       -.6     Vermont ……………………|     5.6   |     5.3   |       -.3     Virginia …………………..|     6.4   |     6.2   |       -.2     Washington …………………|     9.1   |     8.7   |       -.4     Wisconsin ………………….|     7.7   |     7.3   |       -.4     ————————————————————————-   p = preliminary.  Table C.  States with statistically significant unemployment rate changesfrom November 2010 to November 2011, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————-                                |          Rate         |                                               |———–|———–| Over-the-year              State              |  November |  November | rate change(p)                                |    2010   |  2011(p)  |               ————————————————————————-California …………………|    12.5   |    11.3   |      -1.2     Colorado …………………..|     8.9   |     8.0   |       -.9     Delaware …………………..|     8.4   |     7.6   |       -.8     Florida ……………………|    11.9   |    10.0   |      -1.9     Idaho ……………………..|     9.6   |     8.5   |      -1.1     Massachusetts ………………|     8.3   |     7.0   |      -1.3     Michigan …………………..|    11.4   |     9.8   |      -1.6     Minnesota ………………….|     7.0   |     5.9   |      -1.1     Missouri …………………..|     9.6   |     8.2   |      -1.4     New Mexico …………………|     8.6   |     6.5   |      -2.1                                     |           |           |               Ohio ………………………|     9.6   |     8.5   |      -1.1     Oregon …………………….|    10.6   |     9.1   |      -1.5     Utah ………………………|     7.5   |     6.4   |      -1.1     West Virginia ………………|     9.6   |     7.9   |      -1.7     ————————————————————————-   p = preliminary.  Table D.  States with statistically significant employment changes fromOctober 2011 to November 2011, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————–                              |   October   |   November  | Over-the-month           State              |     2011    |     2011(p) |    change(p) ————————————————————————–Alaska……………………|     331,200 |     328,600 |      -2,600  Arkansas………………….|   1,170,600 |   1,177,700 |       7,100  Delaware………………….|     412,700 |     410,000 |      -2,700  Georgia…………………..|   3,797,600 |   3,810,600 |      13,000  Minnesota…………………|   2,673,100 |   2,659,400 |     -13,700  Montana…………………..|     434,800 |     432,200 |      -2,600  Nebraska………………….|     962,500 |     958,500 |      -4,000  New Hampshire……………..|     631,900 |     635,100 |       3,200  New York………………….|   8,634,400 |   8,663,900 |      29,500  South Carolina…………….|   1,822,800 |   1,839,400 |      16,600                                |             |             |              Tennessee…………………|   2,646,500 |   2,656,100 |       9,600  Washington………………..|   2,827,300 |   2,836,400 |       9,100  Wisconsin…………………|   2,754,800 |   2,740,200 |     -14,600  ————————————————————————–   p = preliminary.    Compared to a year ago, the rate is lower by five-tenths of a percentage point. The current comparable national rate is 8.6 percent which reflects a decrease of four-tenths of a percent from the previous month. Over the past three months, Vermont’s seasonally-adjusted statewide unemployment rate has declined by six-tenths of a percent. ‘This is obviously good news for Vermont as one measure of our economic health. This is the 3rd consecutive month reporting a decline in the unemployment rate’, said Labor Commissioner Annie Noonan. ‘We may, however, see an increase in unemployment claims during the upcoming winter months from seasonal layoffs. There has also been some delayed hiring in the ski industry due to the warm weather this season.’‘Vermont businesses in many industries are hiring, particularly in manufacturing, computer and web design, health care, engineering, retail, food services and hospitality. Vermonters who are unemployed or looking to change jobs should come into a Department of Labor regional office and work with our staff for employment assistance. We can connect job seekers to employment opportunities; provide information about training, internship and apprenticeship programs, and services for youth, low income adults, dislocated workers, mature workers, and Vermont veterans. In order to put this State on the best path to prosperity, we need to be able to match Vermonters to jobs in our state; and to do that we need Vermont businesses to list their job openings with the Department of Labor, and then be committed to hiring a well-qualified Vermonter for the job. Our goal at the Department of Labor is to find a job for every unemployed and under-employed Vermonter,’ said Noonan.State of Vermont OverviewThe Vermont seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by three-tenths of a percent in November to 5.3 percent. The comparable rate over the same time period for the United States was 8.6 percent reflecting a decrease of four-tenths of a percent. The seasonally-adjusted Vermont data show the total Vermont labor force grew by 400. Total employment increased by 1,700 while total unemployment declined by 1,200. The over the month changes to the total employment and total unemployment were statistically significant. Aside from the four month span between March and June of 2011, this is the first time since November 2008 that Vermont total unemployment has been below 20,000.November unemployment rates for Vermont’s 17 labor market areas ranged from 3.4 percent in Hartford to 7.0 percent in Newport (note: local labor market area unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted). For comparison, the November unadjusted unemployment rate for Vermont was 4.7 percent which reflects an increase of one-tenth of a percent from the October level and a decline of one percent from a year ago.Analysis of Job Changes by IndustryThe preliminary ‘not seasonally adjusted’ jobs numbers for November show a decrease of 2,300 jobs when compared to the revised October numbers. The October estimates did not change between preliminary and final estimation process. As detailed in the preliminary ‘not seasonally adjusted’ November data, the overall over the month change was concentrated in Total Private (down 2,300 jobs) as Government reported no over the month change. Leisure and Hospitality (-2,150 jobs) and Construction (-850 jobs) were the two private sectors with the largest decreases. The two largest gaining private sectors were Trade, Transportation and Utilities (400 jobs) and Education and Health Services (250 jobs). Local Government Education also showed a relatively large gain of 350 jobs from the prior month levels.The seasonally adjusted data for November reports a decrease of 600 jobs from the revised October data. This reported over the month change does not include the 400 job increase between the preliminary and the revised October estimates due to the inclusion of more data. A review of the seasonally adjusted November numbers reflects that Vermont’s Private Industries reported a decrease of 400 jobs while Total Government reported a decrease of 200 jobs. Construction was the sector of note, reporting a decline of 500 jobs. Professional & Business Services reported an increase of 200 jobs as did Other Services (+200 jobs). All other over the month changes to sector employment were consistent with seasonal trends and did not register greater than plus or minus 100 jobs in the seasonally adjusted series. Meanwhile, Regional and state unemployment rates across the United States were generally lower in November. Forty-threestates and the District of Columbia recorded unemployment rate decreases, threestates posted rate increases, and four states had no rate change, the U.S. Bureauof Labor Statistics reported today. Forty-five states registered unemployment ratedecreases from a year earlier, while five states and the District of Columbiaexperienced increases. The national jobless rate fell by 0.4 percentage pointbetween October and November to 8.6 percent, down from 9.8 percent in November 2010. In November, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 29 states and the District ofColumbia, decreased in 19 states, and was unchanged in 2 states. The largestover-the-month increases in employment occurred in New York (+29,500) and Texas(+20,800). The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in Wisconsin(-14,600), followed by Minnesota (-13,700) and Colorado (-4,500). South Carolinaexperienced the largest over-the-month percentage increase in employment (+0.9percent), followed by Arkansas and Wyoming (+0.6 percent each). Alaska experiencedthe largest over-the-month percentage decline in employment (-0.8 percent), followedby Delaware (-0.7 percent) and Montana (-0.6 percent). Over the year, nonfarmemployment increased in 45 states and the District of Columbia and decreased in5 states. The largest over-the-year percentage increase occurred in North Dakota(+4.5 percent), followed by Wyoming (+3.0 percent) and Oklahoma (+2.8 percent).The largest over-the-year percentage decreases in employment occurred in Delaware(-0.8 percent) and Georgia (-0.5 percent).Regional Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)The West continued to record the highest regional unemployment rate in November, 9.9percent, while the Northeast again reported the lowest rate, 7.9 percent. Three regionsexperienced statistically significant over-the-month unemployment rate changes: theWest (-0.4 percentage point) and the Midwest and South (-0.3 point each). Over the year,all four regions registered significant rate decreases, the largest of which was in theWest (-1.1 percentage points). (See table 1.)Among the nine geographic divisions, the Pacific continued to report the highest joblessrate, 10.6 percent in November. The West North Central again registered the lowest rate,6.3 percent. Eight divisions experienced statistically significant unemployment ratechanges over the month, all decreases. The largest of these occurred in the East SouthCentral and South Atlantic (-0.4 percentage point each). Five divisions recorded significantrate declines from a year earlier, the largest of which were in the Mountain and Pacific(-1.1 percentage points each). No division reported an unemployment rate increase fromNovember 2010.State Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)Nevada continued to record the highest unemployment rate among the states, 13.0 percentin November. California posted the next highest rate, 11.3 percent. North Dakota againregistered the lowest jobless rate, 3.4 percent, followed by Nebraska, 4.1 percent, andSouth Dakota, 4.3 percent. In total, 25 states reported jobless rates significantly lowerthan the U.S. figure of 8.6 percent, 10 states and the District of Columbia had measurablyhigher rates, and 15 states had rates that were not appreciably different from that of thenation. (See tables A and 3.)Thirty states and the District of Columbia experienced statistically significant over-the-monthunemployment rate declines in November. The largest of these was in Michigan (-0.8 percentagepoint), followed by Alabama, Minnesota, South Carolina, and Utah (-0.6 point each). Theremaining 20 states recorded jobless rates that were not measurably different from those of amonth earlier, though some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significantchanges. (See table B.)New Mexico registered the largest jobless rate decrease from November 2010 (-2.1 percentage points).Thirteen additional states reported smaller but also statistically significant decreases over the year.The remaining 36 states and the District of Columbia recorded unemployment rates that were notappreciably different from those of a year earlier. (See table C.)Nonfarm Payroll Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)In November, 13 states recorded statistically significant changes in employment, 7 of which wereincreases. The largest over-the-month statistically significant job gains occurred in New York(+29,500), South Carolina (+16,600), Georgia (+13,000), and Tennessee (+9,600). The largestover-the-month statistically significant declines in employment occurred in Wisconsin (-14,600)and Minnesota (-13,700). (See tables D and 5.)Over the year, 25 states experienced statistically significant changes in employment, all of whichwere increases. The largest increase occurred in California (+233,100), followed by Texas (+226,000) and Florida (+98,100). (See table E.)____________The Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment news release for November 2011 is scheduled to bereleased on Wednesday, January 4, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. (EST). The Regional and State Employment andUnemployment news release for December 2011 is scheduled to be released on Tuesday, January 24, 2012,at 10:00 a.m. (EST). Table A.  States with unemployment rates significantly differ-ent from that of the U.S., November 2011, seasonally adjusted————————————————————–                State                |          Rate(p)      ————————————————————–United States (1) ……………….|           8.6                                              |                       Alaska …………………………|           7.3         California ……………………..|          11.3         Delaware ……………………….|           7.6         District of Columbia …………….|          10.6         Florida ………………………..|          10.0         Georgia ………………………..|           9.9         Hawaii …………………………|           6.5         Illinois ……………………….|          10.0         Iowa …………………………..|           5.7         Kansas …………………………|           6.5                                              |                       Louisiana ………………………|           6.9         Maine ………………………….|           7.0         Maryland ……………………….|           6.9         Massachusetts …………………..|           7.0         Michigan ……………………….|           9.8         Minnesota ………………………|           5.9         Mississippi …………………….|          10.5         Montana ………………………..|           7.1         Nebraska ……………………….|           4.1         Nevada …………………………|          13.0                                              |                       New Hampshire …………………..|           5.2         New Mexico ……………………..|           6.5         New York ……………………….|           8.0         North Carolina ………………….|          10.0         North Dakota ……………………|           3.4         Oklahoma ……………………….|           6.1         Pennsylvania ……………………|           7.9         Rhode Island ……………………|          10.5         South Carolina ………………….|           9.9         South Dakota ……………………|           4.3                                              |                       Texas ………………………….|           8.1         Utah …………………………..|           6.4         Vermont ………………………..|           5.3         Virginia ……………………….|           6.2         Wisconsin ………………………|           7.3         Wyoming ………………………..|           5.8         ————————————————————–   1 Data are not preliminary.   p = preliminary.   November  2011 October  2011 November  2010 October  2011 November  2010  Change to         November 2011 from    Total Labor Force363,200362,800360,8004002,400  Employment344,100342,400339,8001,7004,300  Unemployment19,10020,30021,000-1,200-1,900  Rate5.3%5.6%5.8%-0.3-0.5 Table E.  States with statistically significant employment changes fromNovember 2010 to November 2011, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————–                              |   November  |   November  | Over-the-year           State              |     2010    |     2011(p) |    change(p) ————————————————————————–Arizona…………………..|   2,374,400 |   2,419,800 |      45,400  California………………..|  13,937,000 |  14,170,100 |     233,100  Colorado………………….|   2,222,100 |   2,247,600 |      25,500  Florida…………………..|   7,183,600 |   7,281,700 |      98,100  Illinois………………….|   5,629,000 |   5,686,100 |      57,100  Kentucky………………….|   1,781,500 |   1,802,100 |      20,600  Louisiana…………………|   1,890,100 |   1,936,800 |      46,700  Massachusetts……………..|   3,189,800 |   3,245,400 |      55,600  Michigan………………….|   3,870,800 |   3,930,200 |      59,400  Nebraska………………….|     943,800 |     958,500 |      14,700                                |             |             |              New Hampshire……………..|     625,800 |     635,100 |       9,300  New Jersey………………..|   3,851,900 |   3,881,000 |      29,100  New York………………….|   8,580,300 |   8,663,900 |      83,600  North Dakota………………|     381,900 |     399,200 |      17,300  Ohio……………………..|   5,037,900 |   5,113,500 |      75,600  Oklahoma………………….|   1,526,600 |   1,569,600 |      43,000  Oregon……………………|   1,604,500 |   1,623,400 |      18,900  Pennsylvania………………|   5,644,800 |   5,695,800 |      51,000  South Carolina…………….|   1,806,700 |   1,839,400 |      32,700  Tennessee…………………|   2,623,700 |   2,656,100 |      32,400                                |             |             |              Texas…………………….|  10,403,300 |  10,629,300 |     226,000  Utah……………………..|   1,184,500 |   1,214,700 |      30,200  Vermont…………………..|     298,500 |     303,300 |       4,800  Washington………………..|   2,776,700 |   2,836,400 |      59,700  Wyoming…………………..|     282,900 |     291,300 |       8,400  ————————————————————————–p = preliminary.US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Vermont Department of Labor, 12.20.2011last_img read more

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