Annual Holy Half Marathon raises money for Direct Relief

first_imgKat Robinson | The Observer This year’s Holy Half Marathon and 10k races saw over 1600 participants. The event raised money for Direct Relief, an organization serving those impacted by natural disasters.This year, the proceeds from the registration fees are going to Direct Relief, which is helping those affected by recent natural disasters.“This year, in light of all the natural disasters that have been in Houston, Puerto Rico, Florida — we decided to give back to a natural disaster relief charity,” Lyons said.Lyons said the Holy Half started 14 years ago to raise money for Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.“This year we thought it would be cool to go back to the roots of the race,” she said.One of the best parts of the race is the mix of people who run, Lyons said.“We definitely have people who are really serious about running and running it for time and that’s so great to see to give them a place to do that, but then we also have so many first-time runners,” she said. “ … The community element is really great.”Flannan Hehir, a senior and the winner of this year’s half marathon, said the cause is one of the reasons he runs.“The cause is such a great thing,” he said. “I think so many of your peers are out there supporting you and you’re supporting them, so it’s kind of a mutual relationship where people benefit a lot. … It’s always a cool race.”Daniel Duran, a senior who ran the 10k, said the cause and the motivation to workout were reasons he ran.“You give money to a good cause, and working out is always good for you,” he said. “It gives you a good excuse to get in shape again.”To organize the race, Lyons said the club of just over 10 members has to handle a variety of tasks ranging from obtaining sponsors, overseeing registration, printing t-shirts and medals and coordinating the course logistics.“Every part of the year we’re doing something different,” she said. “In the beginning of the year it’s a lot about contacting charities and sponsors and trying to get that squared away, and then we have to handle everyone’s registration and make sure that gets publicized. In the spring, it’s a lot of planning the logistics of the course and coordinating all the deliveries and making sure everything is squared away.”Not all clubs on campus necessarily allow students to organize an event from start to finish, which is one of the things sophomore Abby Smith, secretary of the Holy Half club and race director, said she likes about the Holy Half.“We never really stop planning it,” she said. “ … It’s also a lot of cross-communication. You’re not just planning something with one person. You have to talk to four or five different people from different areas of the University that make sure things get done.”Senior Katie Lee, the vice president of the club and a race director, said seeing the end of the race makes the work worth it.“It’s a lot of hard work, but it’s really rewarding to see everyone finishing and have everyone’s friends and families cheering them on,” she said. “We get a lot of good feedback, so getting that makes it worth it.”The club members rely on the help of volunteers, especially at the water stations. Some of the water stations are manned by dorms on campus, such as the Flaherty water station.“We have a lot of girls in Flaherty who run the Holy Half, so it’s fun to support them,” Emma Gentine, a junior who was working the station, said. “ … All the runners are very appreciative of everyone who volunteers, and you can make it a lot of fun just screaming and cheering for people, so it’s definitely worth it.”Hannah Morris, a sophomore in Flaherty who also worked the station, said holding out water is something easy to do for those running 13.1 miles.“People are always very friendly and seeing their smiling faces as they grab a cup of water is a pretty nice moment,” she said.Tags: 10k, Direct Relief, half marathon, Holy Half, Holy Half Marathon Over 1600 runners participated in this year’s Holy Half Marathon and 10k races, which were held Saturday. Senior Anna Lyons, the president of the Holy Half club and one of the race directors, said 300 people participated in the 10k and 1300 runners participated in the half marathon. Lyons said an additional 500 runners were on this year’s wait list.“It’s such a great tradition,” she said. “People get so excited about it. We have alumni come in, families come in to watch their kids run or run with them. The students train really hard for it. … All the money goes to charity, so it’s for a really great cause.”last_img read more

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Perú to add prosecutors to fight human trafficking

first_imgFrom 2007 to 2013, prosecutors filed more than 1,500 human trafficking cases. Teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 were the most vulnerable population, accounting for 55 percent of all reported cases. And 85 percent of the victims were females. Of that number, slightly more than half were lured into into involuntary servitude by false offers of legitimate jobs. In addition to sex trafficking, organized crime groups exploit some Peruvian men, women, and children by forcing them to work in gold mining operations, logging, domestic service and other industries. In most cases the victims were lured by promises of good-paying jobs and then forced into labor for little or no pay to work off alleged debts or through fear of physical violence. Forced child labor includes begging, street vending, and cocaine production and transportation. The problem is particularly prevalent in mining and tourism areas, according to a U.S. government report issued in 2014. For example, in La Riconada — a mining town in the Andes Mountains near the Bolivian border — more than 4,500 Peruvian and Bolivian girls were entrapped or forced into prostitution, according to Peruvian police estimates. By Dialogo November 07, 2014 The Peruvian government also announced that it is joining the United Nations’ Blue Heart Campaign against Human Trafficking, an international effort to support anti-trafficking programs. Brazil, Colombia and Mexico are also participants in the UN’s international campaign. The government of Perú plans to hire four special prosecutors to investigate human trafficking in regions with high levels of gold mining and tourism – two areas where the crime is most prevalent. From 2007 to 2013, prosecutors filed more than 1,500 human trafficking cases. Teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 were the most vulnerable population, accounting for 55 percent of all reported cases. And 85 percent of the victims were females. Of that number, slightly more than half were lured into into involuntary servitude by false offers of legitimate jobs. Attorney General Carlos Ramos Heredia’s department included funding for the prosecutors in its 2015 budget request. They will be based in the regions most affected by trafficking: Lima, the city of Iquitos, the city of Piura, and the city of Tacna, and those offices will function as hubs for the detection and monitoring of human trafficking crimes in their respective areas. They’ll also coordinate their efforts with other regional governments. Hiring additional prosecutors will help Peruvian law enforcement authorities bring even more perpetrators of this crime to justice. Hiring additional prosecutors will help Peruvian law enforcement authorities bring even more perpetrators of this crime to justice. Such exploitation forms the basis for an extraordinarily profitable criminal business. Human trafficking ranks only behind drug sales and drug trafficking as the most profitable criminal enterprise in Perú. Additional prosecutors an ‘important measure’: Peruvian Bar Association The Peruvian government also announced that it is joining the United Nations’ Blue Heart Campaign against Human Trafficking, an international effort to support anti-trafficking programs. Brazil, Colombia and Mexico are also participants in the UN’s international campaign. The government of Perú plans to hire four special prosecutors to investigate human trafficking in regions with high levels of gold mining and tourism – two areas where the crime is most prevalent. Additional prosecutors an ‘important measure’: Peruvian Bar Association In 2013, prosecutors in Perú obtained 41 convictions for human trafficking. Under Peruvian law, such convictions can result in a prison sentence of eight to 25 years. Such exploitation forms the basis for an extraordinarily profitable criminal business. Human trafficking ranks only behind drug sales and drug trafficking as the most profitable criminal enterprise in Perú. In 2013, prosecutors in Perú obtained 41 convictions for human trafficking. Under Peruvian law, such convictions can result in a prison sentence of eight to 25 years. Peru prosecutes hundreds of human trafficking cases “We have already had the first meeting with the representatives of Chile and Ecuador, and we are in the fight to make the necessary arrangements with their attorneys general,” he said. Attorney General Carlos Ramos Heredia’s department included funding for the prosecutors in its 2015 budget request. They will be based in the regions most affected by trafficking: Lima, the city of Iquitos, the city of Piura, and the city of Tacna, and those offices will function as hubs for the detection and monitoring of human trafficking crimes in their respective areas. They’ll also coordinate their efforts with other regional governments. “We have already had the first meeting with the representatives of Chile and Ecuador, and we are in the fight to make the necessary arrangements with their attorneys general,” he said. The new prosecutors haven’t been hired yet, but Peruvian law enforcement officials have already brought hundreds of human traffickers to justice. Peru prosecutes hundreds of human trafficking cases In addition to sex trafficking, organized crime groups exploit some Peruvian men, women, and children by forcing them to work in gold mining operations, logging, domestic service and other industries. In most cases the victims were lured by promises of good-paying jobs and then forced into labor for little or no pay to work off alleged debts or through fear of physical violence. Forced child labor includes begging, street vending, and cocaine production and transportation. The new prosecutors haven’t been hired yet, but Peruvian law enforcement officials have already brought hundreds of human traffickers to justice. “The appointment of (additional) prosecutors to investigate human trafficking is one of the most important measures to investigate this crime,” said José Luis García, a spokesman for the Bar Association of Lima. “These prosecutors will be able to dedicate themselves exclusively to investigating and preventing human trafficking. It is an important step in Perú’s judicial system to the benefit of its citizens.” Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article. “The appointment of (additional) prosecutors to investigate human trafficking is one of the most important measures to investigate this crime,” said José Luis García, a spokesman for the Bar Association of Lima. “These prosecutors will be able to dedicate themselves exclusively to investigating and preventing human trafficking. It is an important step in Perú’s judicial system to the benefit of its citizens.” The problem is particularly prevalent in mining and tourism areas, according to a U.S. government report issued in 2014. For example, in La Riconada — a mining town in the Andes Mountains near the Bolivian border — more than 4,500 Peruvian and Bolivian girls were entrapped or forced into prostitution, according to Peruvian police estimates. Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article.last_img read more

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Video: Ghana League Cypher returns on March 1

first_imgPopular and informative Ghana League Cypher show is set to return after more than four months break due to delays in the start of the Ghana Premier League.The show is aimed at stirring interest in the Ghana Premier League and serve football fans with top notch analysis. It is therefore no surprise that it has become one of the most sort after sports programme in the country.This season will not be different as the Ghana League Cypher team looks to improve on all fronts and provide unparalleled analysis on the League.The inclusion of a segment to engage fans at various league centers on match days and key stakeholders will provide a fresh twist to Ghana’s maiden Premier league review and preview show.Joy Sports’ George Addo Jnr, who is also host of the show, will navigate the 50-minute show, alongside connoisseurs with extensive knowledge of the local league, taking sports analysis of the GPL to a whole new level.The Ghana League Cypher will available for download every Tuesday, beginning March 1 and can be viewed on www.myjoyonline.com, a dozen Sports platforms and on the Show’s social media pages on Youtube, Facebook and Twitter.  –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoySportsGH. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

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