Drunken man jailed

first_imgIt was however not immediately clear ifwhat triggered the assault. The 21-year-old Ian Shalom Matullano ofBarangay Divinagracia, La Paz district hit Clark Lawrence Pudadera’s head witha bottle of beer, police report showed. Pudadera sustained injuries on the napeand was brought to the Western Visayas Medical Center in Mandurriao districtfor treatment. The incident happened in front of astore around 2 a.m. on Thursday, police said.  center_img ILOILO City – Police arrested a drunkenman in Barangay Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo. The suspect was arrested and now detainedin the lockup cell of the Leganes police station, facing charges./PNlast_img

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McCleary: Leave SU fandom out of the Interstate 690 tragedy

first_imgA question addressed to the Onondaga County DA began: “It’s no secret you’re one of the biggest SU fans out there …” I was shocked: I wondered what kind of narrative they were pursuing. Is it: Will this accident affect the way you paint your face Orange on Saturday, DA? Is it: Will you forgive Boeheim and root for the Orange, DA? Is it: Will you forget about the incident and focus on the game, DA?On the phone a day later, Brian Hernandez, Jimenez’s son, didn’t want to feed into the same story he’d seen written over and over again. He knows about the crash. He was told all the details. He wanted someone to ask about his Dad. It’s OK to show support for both of these people. John Violanti, a faculty expert on police stress at the University at Buffalo, said Boeheim, based on a National Comorbidity study, runs just about an eight-to-12 percent risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder — commonly known as PTSD. But it can be triggered by the simplest of reminders. Traumatic stress for Boeheim could appear anytime from immediately after the crash to five months later, Violanti said. This also extends to the three others in the car with Jimenez at the time of the crash, who seemingly provided similar help.Scott Sabella, an assistant professor in UB’s department of counseling, school and educational psychology, with a background in family coping, said there’s no greater aid than a close support group, one that the Boeheim’s should feel and the family of Jimenez should see with the help of a now-closed GoFundMe campaign that raised nearly $13,000. For Boeheim’s recovery, it requires that he veer off cognitive dissonance or inconsistent thoughts about his own self-image, Sabella said. All the reports and members of the community told him he did everything he could. His next step to healing is to believe they’re true.“Based upon what we know today,” SPD Chief Kenton Buckner said on Thursday, “we have a tragic accident that resulted in a gentleman’s death that happened to involve a high-profile individual.”Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerBut that tragic accident caused loss, the worst pain that a family can feel, Sabella said. For the family of Jimenez, acceptance won’t do them any good. They know they did nothing wrong. Now they are simply left with a void. On the way to the Carrier Dome on Saturday, I was in another Uber, gripped in another conversation about Syracuse. “I hope (the fans are) respectful to Boeheim,” my driver said. “I hope they don’t cheer. He’s not that type of person. He doesn’t want that.” Finally, someone looked beyond basketball. That’s not what this was about, not ever. After the game, Boeheim was asked how he felt. But he — as he should have — said it didn’t matter.The moment of silence for Jimenez, before the game, came at the tail-end of thundering cheers as Syracuse introduced Boeheim out of the tunnel. Boeheim offered just his arm and a slight grin at the crowd that had been there to support him, and always has. It became clear what would be the lasting memory of that game, a hero’s welcome for Boeheim, a crowd behind their coach grieving.“This is never going away,” Boeheim said. “Tuesday it’s not gonna be any better. It’s not gonna be any better next week. It’s not gonna be any better next month. It’s not gonna be any better next year. But it doesn’t matter how I feel. It matters how the family feels.”For Boeheim, each trip by the home crowd will bring the reminders: of the community support, of the people who love and trust he did no wrong. But for the family of Jimenez, the gripping pain with extend to its barbeques, baseball games and fishing trips, attempting to fill a gaping hole. Don’t forget about their side of this tragedy.Michael McCleary is the sports editor for The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at mmcclear@syr.edu or @MikeJMcCleary.CORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Scott Sabella’s title was misstated. The Daily Orange regrets this error.  Comments Published on February 27, 2019 at 12:28 am Facebook Twitter Google+center_img UPDATED: February 27, 2019 at 7:56 p.m.Friday, I was riding an Uber back to my apartment after having dinner with my family. My driver and I started to discuss Syracuse. Syracuse basketball, that is. But in this city, if you mention something about a game between the Orange and the Duke Blue Devils, no one asks you to clarify what sport you’re talking about.In this unfortunate case, our conversation was obliged to shift. Two days earlier, late at night on Wednesday, Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim struck and killed a man, Jorge Jimenez, on Interstate 690. It’s an event Boeheim has said will stay with him forever. It won’t get easier, he said, no matter how much time passes.My driver started to complain. He mentioned he heard Jimenez’s family spoke out that day about Boeheim’s decision to coach. Well, what was he supposed to do? The driver asked, as if he knew the answer before doubling back.“Well, I guess if I killed someone, I wouldn’t go to work a few days,” he concluded.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBoeheim described the pain as “unimaginable.” Of course it is. Someone lost their father, their friend, their neighbor, and another is left with the fact that he might have ripped all of that away. From the moment after impact Wednesday, Boeheim seemed to do all the right things, according to the Syracuse Police Department. After the Duke game, he made the proper remarks. People let him know that, as they always will. But as the story developed, it revealed harsh realities about what happens when one side of an accident contains “the most beloved person in central New York,” as Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick referred to Boeheim. Perpetrated by some shoddy reporting and sometimes uneven fan culture, the online coverage of this incident from both the media and the viewing public almost squashed the victim’s side of the narrative. We should not blame Boeheim: This was an unfortunate tragedy, and he should be commended for everything he’s done in response. We should understand he and his family’s pain. But we must not forget that someone lost their life, someone lost their friend, someone lost their Dad. When assessing the I-690 tragedy, out of respect for the Boeheim and Jimenez families, leave Syracuse basketball fandom out of it.As the news broke Thursday, “Boeheim” made its way into every headline, including those of The Daily Orange’s. It always will. That is not an exploitation of his status as much as it is an acknowledgment of his figure. But at the SPD press conference on Thursday, the 43-year Hall of Fame basketball coach’s eminence seemed to overshadow the details of the crash. Question after question came, which echoed the bevy of tweets that came out in support of Boeheim, and some, even, attaching a fake allegiance to an unnamed victim.last_img read more

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Centenarian Dorothy (Jones) Barry, 103, Mayfield: Jan. 24, 112 – June 10, 2015

first_imgDorothy BarryDorothy (Jones) Barry died Wednesday, June 10,2015 at Sumner Regional Medical Center in Wellington at the age of 103. She was born to Warner Larue and Carrie (Breneman) Jones on January 24, 1912 on a farm near Milan, KS. On May 2, 1931, she married her high school sweetheart, Harold “Jiggs” Stocking, at Anthony. To this union were born three children: Harold “Fred” Stocking, Jr., Gary Neal Stocking, and Sherry Lynn Stocking.    Dorothy attended one-room schools near Milan and graduated in 1930. Vocally gifted, she sang duets and solo’s in operettas and plays, performed for literary meetings, and played the lead in many of the Milan High School plays.  Dorothy worked hard all her life. She grew up helping her mother feed a large family and began to help her mother cook when she was so small she had to stand on an apple box to reach the stove.  She loved working in the fields with her father, driving his mule team, helping stack hay, and later learning to drive their new tractor.  After she married Jiggs, they lived near Mayfield, where they raised wheat and registered Ayrshire cattle. Dorothy and Jiggs had his and hers M & M tractors and they worked side by side in the fields. If her tractor broke down, she knew how to fix it.  Dorothy was a member of the Mayfield Federated Church where she taught Sunday School and served on the church board.  When Jiggs died at the age of 50 in 1961, Dorothy attended beauty school in Wichita. She graduated at the top of her class in 1962 as the valedictorian, and purchased the Mayfield Beauty Shop where she worked for 17 years. In 1967, Dorothy married Homer Prather of Wellington. They lived in Dorothy’s house on the farm for about a year and then moved to Homer’s home in Wellington.  After their retirement, Homer and Dorothy enjoyed traveling and they spent their winters at a campground at Aransas Pass, Texas, with other friends and family, where they enjoyed ocean fishing. Homer passed away from cancer in 1990.  On December 12, 1992, Dorothy married Harlan Barry and she and Harlan enjoyed traveling and spending their winters in Arizona and Texas until Harlan’s death in 1998. Dorothy was President of Circle for two years at the First Christian Church, Wellington, President of the Wellington Cosmetology Association, Member of the Wellington Art Association, Member of the Good Neighbor’s Club, Mayfield/Milan area, and President of the Worthwhile Farm Bureau, Mayfield, President of the Crochet Club, Mayfield, member  of the Sumner County Historical and Genealogical Society and she co-wrote the Mayfield/Anson news column for the Conway Springs Star and Argonia Argosy for many years. Dorothy loved to travel and had visited 49 states and two countries. She loved to read, take photographs, paint landscapes, fish, and make and eat homemade ice cream.  But most of all, Dorothy was a loving mother and grandmother, and faithful servant of the Lord who studied her Bible daily, and she was never happier than when surrounded by her family enjoying a bowl of her homemade ice cream. She will be missed by her children, her grandchildren, and her many great, great-great, and great-great-great grandchildren and her nieces and nephews.  Dorothy is survived and will be missed by her daughter Sherry Kline, Wellington, daughter-in-law, Sharon Stocking, Wellington, grandchildren: Daryl (Lee) Stocking, Hanford, CA, Brad (Becky) Stocking, Wellington, Marlon (Chong) Stocking, Rockwall, TX, Tammy Titus, Derby, Kris (Mike Miller) Sims, Haysville,  Lisa (Rob) Baird, Wellington, Jarrod Kline, Wellington, Marya (Marc) Young, Wellington, step-daughters: Dorothy Ala, Wellington and Donna Beggs, McPherson, step-grandchildren: Kraig Koerner, Wellington, Kevin “Petey” (Brenda) Koerner, Wellington, Kendall (Ashley) Koerner, Wellington, step-son-in-law Jerry Ross, Wellington along with many great and great-great grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Dorothy was preceded in death by her parents, her sons, Gary and Harold, Jr., her husbands, her brothers and sisters: Floyd Jones, Rose Roe, Daryl Jones Sr., and Fern Jones, daughter-in-law Nancy (Cook) Stocking, step-daughter-in-law Janice Ross, step-son-in-law Fred Beggs, step grandson, Fred Richard Beggs, great-grandsons Travis Stocking and Wade Titus, and great-grandson-in-law, Jody Nelson. Visitation will be held at the funeral home from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sunday, June 14, 2015 with the family present from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Funeral services for Dorothy will be held at 3 p.m., Monday, June 15th, 2015 at Mayfield Federated Church, Mayfield. Interment will follow at the Osborne Cemetery, Mayfield. Memorial Funds have been established in her loving memory to the Wellington Christian Academy or Mayfield Federated Church. Contributions may be mailed or left with the funeral home. To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info. Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.Âlast_img read more

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