SOUTHCOM Commander Discusses Security in Argentina

first_imgBy Juan Delgado/Diálogo July 29, 2019 U.S. Navy Admiral Craig S. Faller, commander of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), visited Argentina in late June. Adm. Faller met with Argentine Army Lieutenant General Bari del Valle, chairman of the Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Minister of Defense Oscar Aguad, as well as other Argentine military leaders.The senior leaders discussed regional security and cooperation to strengthen the relationship between both countries. During his stay in Buenos Aires, Adm. Faller also gave a presentation at the Joint War College (ESGC, in Spanish) and toured the facilities of Argentina’s Joint Training Center for Peacekeeping Operations.“It was an excellent meeting. We had an honest exchange of viewpoints about some issues and shared our opinion about the security environment and opportunities to work even more closely in the near future,” Adm. Faller told the press about the reunions with Argentine defense and military authorities.During his presentation with ESGC cadets and officers, Adm. Faller warned about the threat that some countries pose to the region. “Unfortunately, Russia, China, and Iran don’t share our values on matters such as democracy and human rights.” Adm. Faller also pointed to Venezuela, Cuba, and Nicaragua for their lack of democratic values.The SOUTHCOM commander emphasized the crisis in Venezuela and the regime of Nicolás Maduro that promotes narcotrafficking and terrorism, representing a threat to the region. Adm. Faller stressed that transnational criminal organizations seek to undermine legitimate governments, which have to cooperate to preserve stability.Argentine Army Colonel José Colombo, head of the Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff’s Department of Institutional Communication and Public Affairs, praised the bonds of friendship between the United States and Argentina. “With the United States, and particularly with SOUTHCOM, there is a solid relationship based on mutual trust and on the fact that we have threats in common, just like with the rest of the hemisphere,” the officer told Diálogo.During an interview with the Argentine magazine DEF, Adm. Faller said the relationship between both nations was strong. “In any case, here we work on solid foundations, consisting of shared values, such as mutual trust, and educational, joint exercises, and equipment exchange activities. When you trust, you’re able to share […]. When we work jointly and share information, we provide the most effective responses to these threats.”last_img read more

Read more

Holding: Archer’s workload at his pace is ‘unsustainable’, tantamount to ‘abuse’

first_imgBy Charles RichardsonFORMER West Indies fast bowler Michael Holding believes England’s overuse of Jofra Archer is tantamount to “abuse”.Holding claimed England’s regular deployment of Archer, who bowled 22 of the 75 overs on the penultimate day of the second Ashes Test at Lord’s, was “unsustainable”.“Archer bowled a third of all the overs bowled. That’s a spinner’s quota,” he told The Independent. “If you keep bowling him like this you will lose the 96 mph delivery. He’ll still bowl fast, 90mph, but do you want to lose the express pace? It is not just about this match or the next, but next year and the one after that.”South Africa’s Kagiso RabadaHolding compared Archer to South Africa’s leading quick, Kagiso Rabada who is the same age as Archer (24), has bowled more than 7 000 overs in Test cricket – more than any other fast bowler his age – and has a history of back trouble, which has caused him to soften the speed of his deliveries.“It’s abuse,” Holding said. “When I was bowling, we had three other quicks just as fast. We could share the burden.”While Archer’s spell was ruthlessly impressive – it ultimately forced Australia’s batting talisman Steve Smith from the field with injury – Holding believes that England’s firecracker needs to be monitored closely in the future.“England need to be very careful with Archer. He is obviously very fit, as you could see with his recovery from the side strain. Like me, he is tall, not big and muscular. He relies on rhythm and looks very relaxed running in. All that is in his favour but it is not sustainable for England to use him like this in every match.Holding’s warning was echoed by Jim Pate, senior physiologist at the centre for health and human performance, who spoke exclusively to Telegraph Sport.“Even for a bowler with such a fluent action as Jofra Archer’s, there are inherent risks in one bowler being asked to take on such a big workload in one match,” he said.“Fast bowling places a big strain on different areas of the body: there is a huge amount of stress running through the knee and ankle in the landing leg (although Archer’s smaller jump into the crease mitigates against this a little); there is pressure on the shoulder, which generates so much of the pace in the delivery; and there is tension running through the bowler’s side.“The nature of high-performance athletes is that they will push themselves to the limits of what their bodies can endure – and often beyond. It is the job of the coaches to ensure the athletes are protected from themselves and not allowed to go too far into the danger zone which can lead to injury.” (Yahoo Sport)last_img read more

Read more

Oshodi Tags Asoju Oba Cup as Bedrock of T’tennis in Nigeria

first_imgHaving churned out some of the country’s finest stars in the last 50 years,, the annual Asoju Oba Cup has become the bedrock of modern table tennis in Nigeria.This was the view of the former Lagos State Commissioner for Sports, Wahid Oshodi who described the longest running table tennis in Africa has a breeding ground for world beaters.“The Asoju Oba Cup is the bedrock and foundation of modern day table tennis in Nigeria considering the fact that a great majority of our top players over the last 50 years have honed their craft playing in this tournament. Wahid Oshodi “To win the Asoju Oba cup would be the crowning glory of any player and a stepping stone into the National teams. The National Coaches over the years themselves have all come through this tournament and they in turn use it as a hunting ground for young talent.“One should also note that with the Asoju Oba Cup unlike other tournaments the prizes don’t end with the tournament but the late sponsor – Sir Chief Molade Okoya-Thomas continues to support the players education and careers. He along with Late Dr. Efunkoya and a very select few are the true fathers of table tennis in Nigeria,” Oshodi said.The former President of the Nigeria Table Tennis Federation (NTTF), said the tournament has become table tennis Olympic Games in Lagos.“This tournament was our Olympics in Lagos. It was a week-long jamboree. Different categories of players from veterans of yesteryears to the mini cadets all had a stake l. It was always something to look forward to and it was a festival of table tennis. For us on the technical side, it gave us a great chance to see how the players performed under the gaze of the large crowds that always came to watch. It was a test not only of skill but composure also which is very important for a top player. The sponsor gave massive financial support to the tournament and the players. It just made us so proud that such a tournament existed in our city. If we were sometimes doubtful about funding for our events this was not the case for the Asoju Oba Cup,” he added.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Read more

McCleary: Leave SU fandom out of the Interstate 690 tragedy

first_imgA question addressed to the Onondaga County DA began: “It’s no secret you’re one of the biggest SU fans out there …” I was shocked: I wondered what kind of narrative they were pursuing. Is it: Will this accident affect the way you paint your face Orange on Saturday, DA? Is it: Will you forgive Boeheim and root for the Orange, DA? Is it: Will you forget about the incident and focus on the game, DA?On the phone a day later, Brian Hernandez, Jimenez’s son, didn’t want to feed into the same story he’d seen written over and over again. He knows about the crash. He was told all the details. He wanted someone to ask about his Dad. It’s OK to show support for both of these people. John Violanti, a faculty expert on police stress at the University at Buffalo, said Boeheim, based on a National Comorbidity study, runs just about an eight-to-12 percent risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder — commonly known as PTSD. But it can be triggered by the simplest of reminders. Traumatic stress for Boeheim could appear anytime from immediately after the crash to five months later, Violanti said. This also extends to the three others in the car with Jimenez at the time of the crash, who seemingly provided similar help.Scott Sabella, an assistant professor in UB’s department of counseling, school and educational psychology, with a background in family coping, said there’s no greater aid than a close support group, one that the Boeheim’s should feel and the family of Jimenez should see with the help of a now-closed GoFundMe campaign that raised nearly $13,000. For Boeheim’s recovery, it requires that he veer off cognitive dissonance or inconsistent thoughts about his own self-image, Sabella said. All the reports and members of the community told him he did everything he could. His next step to healing is to believe they’re true.“Based upon what we know today,” SPD Chief Kenton Buckner said on Thursday, “we have a tragic accident that resulted in a gentleman’s death that happened to involve a high-profile individual.”Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerBut that tragic accident caused loss, the worst pain that a family can feel, Sabella said. For the family of Jimenez, acceptance won’t do them any good. They know they did nothing wrong. Now they are simply left with a void. On the way to the Carrier Dome on Saturday, I was in another Uber, gripped in another conversation about Syracuse. “I hope (the fans are) respectful to Boeheim,” my driver said. “I hope they don’t cheer. He’s not that type of person. He doesn’t want that.” Finally, someone looked beyond basketball. That’s not what this was about, not ever. After the game, Boeheim was asked how he felt. But he — as he should have — said it didn’t matter.The moment of silence for Jimenez, before the game, came at the tail-end of thundering cheers as Syracuse introduced Boeheim out of the tunnel. Boeheim offered just his arm and a slight grin at the crowd that had been there to support him, and always has. It became clear what would be the lasting memory of that game, a hero’s welcome for Boeheim, a crowd behind their coach grieving.“This is never going away,” Boeheim said. “Tuesday it’s not gonna be any better. It’s not gonna be any better next week. It’s not gonna be any better next month. It’s not gonna be any better next year. But it doesn’t matter how I feel. It matters how the family feels.”For Boeheim, each trip by the home crowd will bring the reminders: of the community support, of the people who love and trust he did no wrong. But for the family of Jimenez, the gripping pain with extend to its barbeques, baseball games and fishing trips, attempting to fill a gaping hole. Don’t forget about their side of this tragedy.Michael McCleary is the sports editor for The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at mmcclear@syr.edu or @MikeJMcCleary.CORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Scott Sabella’s title was misstated. The Daily Orange regrets this error.  Comments Published on February 27, 2019 at 12:28 am Facebook Twitter Google+center_img UPDATED: February 27, 2019 at 7:56 p.m.Friday, I was riding an Uber back to my apartment after having dinner with my family. My driver and I started to discuss Syracuse. Syracuse basketball, that is. But in this city, if you mention something about a game between the Orange and the Duke Blue Devils, no one asks you to clarify what sport you’re talking about.In this unfortunate case, our conversation was obliged to shift. Two days earlier, late at night on Wednesday, Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim struck and killed a man, Jorge Jimenez, on Interstate 690. It’s an event Boeheim has said will stay with him forever. It won’t get easier, he said, no matter how much time passes.My driver started to complain. He mentioned he heard Jimenez’s family spoke out that day about Boeheim’s decision to coach. Well, what was he supposed to do? The driver asked, as if he knew the answer before doubling back.“Well, I guess if I killed someone, I wouldn’t go to work a few days,” he concluded.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBoeheim described the pain as “unimaginable.” Of course it is. Someone lost their father, their friend, their neighbor, and another is left with the fact that he might have ripped all of that away. From the moment after impact Wednesday, Boeheim seemed to do all the right things, according to the Syracuse Police Department. After the Duke game, he made the proper remarks. People let him know that, as they always will. But as the story developed, it revealed harsh realities about what happens when one side of an accident contains “the most beloved person in central New York,” as Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick referred to Boeheim. Perpetrated by some shoddy reporting and sometimes uneven fan culture, the online coverage of this incident from both the media and the viewing public almost squashed the victim’s side of the narrative. We should not blame Boeheim: This was an unfortunate tragedy, and he should be commended for everything he’s done in response. We should understand he and his family’s pain. But we must not forget that someone lost their life, someone lost their friend, someone lost their Dad. When assessing the I-690 tragedy, out of respect for the Boeheim and Jimenez families, leave Syracuse basketball fandom out of it.As the news broke Thursday, “Boeheim” made its way into every headline, including those of The Daily Orange’s. It always will. That is not an exploitation of his status as much as it is an acknowledgment of his figure. But at the SPD press conference on Thursday, the 43-year Hall of Fame basketball coach’s eminence seemed to overshadow the details of the crash. Question after question came, which echoed the bevy of tweets that came out in support of Boeheim, and some, even, attaching a fake allegiance to an unnamed victim.last_img read more

Read more

Zlatan Ibrahimovic rejected FC Milan?

first_imgThe first star of PSG Zlatan Ibrahimovic stated that Milan desperately attempted to bring him back, but that the decided to end the season in Paris.The coach of Milan Sinisa Mihajlovic requested from the officials of the club to fulfill his wish and bring Ibrahimovic.“If one team wants me, they must negotiate with my manager. Honestly, I am happy when big clubs show interest in me, but they must talk to the manager”, Ibrahimovic said.When asked what he thinks of potential return to Milan, since his contract with PSG expires next summer, the Swedish football player answered:“I don’t know yet, I am happy in PSG and this summer I made a decision to stay. I know that FC Milan is disappointed”, said Ibrahimovic to the Swedish journalists at the gathering of the national team.(Source: novovrijeme.ba)last_img read more

Read more