Professor explores creation and evolution theories

first_imgNotre Dame theology professor Celia Deane-Drummond concluded the two-day Templeton Colloquium with a discussion of creation ex nihilo and Darwinian evolution Wednesday afternoon.The Notre Dame Institute of Advanced Study (NDIAS) and visiting Templeton fellow Dr. Douglas Hedley of Cambridge University sponsored the colloquium. Featured speakers from multiple disciplines discussed Plato’s notion of participation in the divine, used in a Christian sense to explain the relation between creature and Creator. Deane-Drummond began her talk by posing a question about the current predicament of science and faith.“How, in a secular world dominated by an evolutionary paradigm, is it still reasonable to think about creation, Christ and spirit?” Deane-Drummond said.Within this frame, Deane-Drummond explored possible answers to this question through secular and religious outlets that engage with the biological sciences.“Evolutionary theory has, ever since Darwin, resisted the idea of non-material forces operative in the emergent beings,” she said. “But, more recently, secular writers are beginning to open up alternatives that biologists are prepared to take seriously. ”Deane-Drummond cited New York University philosopher Thomas Nagel as one such writer who is willing to accept the presence of a non-material transcendent force in the universe but does not credit creation to a god.Deane-Drummond made use of Aquinas’ understanding of creation to bring Platonic notions and the theory of evolutiony into agreement.“Aquinas develops a hierarchy in the ordering of being, from rocks through to intelligent lif, and, ultimately, humanity,” Deane-Drummond said. “Aquinas marries this hierarchal view with Platonic concept of an absolute Being that is the ultimate source of all such being.”Deane-Drummond proceeded totdiscuss evolutionary theory as an enduring hypothesis based in speculation through a biological viewpoint..She said a model of analogy would make best sense of possible relations between the philosophical concept of participation and evolutionary theory.She said suggested analogies included the symbiosis of creatures contributing to the life of each other while ultimately dependine on God. The process of cooperation of organisms through niche-construction theory was also posited as an analogy of how creatures participate in God’s immanence.“I suggest the language of analogy edges towards the meaningful in what might seem incomprehensible difference,” she said. “It is only by experimenting and speaking a language that resonates with those we are in dialogue with that a faint glimmering of insight can come to the surface.Tags: creation, evolution, Notre Dame Institute of Advanced Study, participation, Templeton Colloquiumlast_img read more

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Rare steal against the shift proves costly for LA Dodgers

first_imgA Dodgers executive and a reporter shared an escalator minutes after the New York Mets won Game 5 of the National League Championship Series on Thursday at Dodger Stadium.The question: Are plays like the one in the fourth inning, when the Mets’ Daniel Murphy stole third base unopposed against an infield shift, covered in spring training?“No,” the executive said, “but it will be next year.”It was one of the most unusual stolen bases a baseball fan will see, and it contributed to the Dodgers’ downfall Thursday. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Murphy singled to lead off the fourth inning and went to second base when Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke walked the next batter, Lucas Duda. The Dodgers had shifted everyone to the right side of the infield with the left-handed Duda at the plate, so Murphy calmly stole third base without a single player standing within spitting distance. • PHOTOS: Mets eliminate Dodgers in Game 5Murphy, who stole two bases in the regular season, had picked an opportune time for his third. So, who was supposed to cover third base?center_img “That’s probably Corey (Seager) there,” Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said of the Dodgers’ shortstop. “He’s on that side. Whoever’s on that side. Obviously, we don’t shift a ton, but it’s probably his responsibility there. It’s probably all of our responsibility as far as guys on the field talking about that, making sure that we know.”Mattingly concluded by calling it “just a breakdown right there.”But third baseman Justin Turner offered a different take.“We talked about it, if he was going to try to steal, Seager would be covering second and we make sure we remind Zack that if (Murphy) steals you’re the guy who has to cover third,” Turner said. “We didn’t really – I don’t think anybody thought about a walk. Duda takes a good pitch and kind of freezes everyone, because he didn’t actually even leave the box. I don’t know if he thought it was called a strike or what.”The breakdown proved costly. The Mets’ next batter, Travis d’Arnaud, lofted a fly ball that drifted toward the seats in right field. Andre Ethier tracked it down on the foul side of the white chalk. Murphy tagged up and scored easily, and the game was tied 2-2.• HOFFARTH: TBS fails to ask Mattingly about Ethier screaming matchMurphy said that Mets first base coach Tom Goodwin instructs players to “always keep your head up,” which guided his thinking in that situation.“That was just a situation where, fortunately, we came out on the right end of it,” Murphy said.AlsoKiké Hernandez started in left field for the first time since July 24. … Orel Hershiser threw the ceremonial first pitch to former teammate Mickey Hatcher. … Justin Turner’s double in the third inning gave him five doubles in one postseason series, a franchise record. He extended the record with another double in the fifth inning. … The Dodgers’ only win in team history on Oct. 15? In 1988, when Kirk Gibson walked off Oakland A’s in Game 1 of the World Series with a home run against Dennis Eckersley. … Mattingly, whose contract expires after the season, declined to address his status for next year after the game.last_img read more

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Inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women loses executive director

first_imgOTTAWA – A senior staff member with the much-scrutinized inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women has resigned.Executive director Michele Moreau cites personal reasons for her departure, which is effective July 21.The inquiry released a statement saying it accepted Moreau’s resignation with great sadness.Some First Nations leaders have been critical of the inquiry’s progress so far and victims’ families have said they haven’t been adequately consulted about hearings.Chief commissioner Marion Buller promised improved communication.Moreau said it is with mixed emotions that she is departing.“I wish the whole team great courage to bring this national inquiry where it needs to go in order to change our society for the better,” Moreau said in the statement.last_img

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