Annual Holy Half Marathon raises money for Direct Relief

first_imgKat Robinson | The Observer This year’s Holy Half Marathon and 10k races saw over 1600 participants. The event raised money for Direct Relief, an organization serving those impacted by natural disasters.This year, the proceeds from the registration fees are going to Direct Relief, which is helping those affected by recent natural disasters.“This year, in light of all the natural disasters that have been in Houston, Puerto Rico, Florida — we decided to give back to a natural disaster relief charity,” Lyons said.Lyons said the Holy Half started 14 years ago to raise money for Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.“This year we thought it would be cool to go back to the roots of the race,” she said.One of the best parts of the race is the mix of people who run, Lyons said.“We definitely have people who are really serious about running and running it for time and that’s so great to see to give them a place to do that, but then we also have so many first-time runners,” she said. “ … The community element is really great.”Flannan Hehir, a senior and the winner of this year’s half marathon, said the cause is one of the reasons he runs.“The cause is such a great thing,” he said. “I think so many of your peers are out there supporting you and you’re supporting them, so it’s kind of a mutual relationship where people benefit a lot. … It’s always a cool race.”Daniel Duran, a senior who ran the 10k, said the cause and the motivation to workout were reasons he ran.“You give money to a good cause, and working out is always good for you,” he said. “It gives you a good excuse to get in shape again.”To organize the race, Lyons said the club of just over 10 members has to handle a variety of tasks ranging from obtaining sponsors, overseeing registration, printing t-shirts and medals and coordinating the course logistics.“Every part of the year we’re doing something different,” she said. “In the beginning of the year it’s a lot about contacting charities and sponsors and trying to get that squared away, and then we have to handle everyone’s registration and make sure that gets publicized. In the spring, it’s a lot of planning the logistics of the course and coordinating all the deliveries and making sure everything is squared away.”Not all clubs on campus necessarily allow students to organize an event from start to finish, which is one of the things sophomore Abby Smith, secretary of the Holy Half club and race director, said she likes about the Holy Half.“We never really stop planning it,” she said. “ … It’s also a lot of cross-communication. You’re not just planning something with one person. You have to talk to four or five different people from different areas of the University that make sure things get done.”Senior Katie Lee, the vice president of the club and a race director, said seeing the end of the race makes the work worth it.“It’s a lot of hard work, but it’s really rewarding to see everyone finishing and have everyone’s friends and families cheering them on,” she said. “We get a lot of good feedback, so getting that makes it worth it.”The club members rely on the help of volunteers, especially at the water stations. Some of the water stations are manned by dorms on campus, such as the Flaherty water station.“We have a lot of girls in Flaherty who run the Holy Half, so it’s fun to support them,” Emma Gentine, a junior who was working the station, said. “ … All the runners are very appreciative of everyone who volunteers, and you can make it a lot of fun just screaming and cheering for people, so it’s definitely worth it.”Hannah Morris, a sophomore in Flaherty who also worked the station, said holding out water is something easy to do for those running 13.1 miles.“People are always very friendly and seeing their smiling faces as they grab a cup of water is a pretty nice moment,” she said.Tags: 10k, Direct Relief, half marathon, Holy Half, Holy Half Marathon Over 1600 runners participated in this year’s Holy Half Marathon and 10k races, which were held Saturday. Senior Anna Lyons, the president of the Holy Half club and one of the race directors, said 300 people participated in the 10k and 1300 runners participated in the half marathon. Lyons said an additional 500 runners were on this year’s wait list.“It’s such a great tradition,” she said. “People get so excited about it. We have alumni come in, families come in to watch their kids run or run with them. The students train really hard for it. … All the money goes to charity, so it’s for a really great cause.”last_img read more

Read more

WLAX : Queener brings versatile goaltending, scoring background to coaching staff

first_img Comments Published on April 24, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2 Without All-American Liz Hogan in net, Gary Gait turned to a professional to mentor the inexperienced goaltenders tasked with filling her place.Gait hired Brett Queener, the goalie for the Hamilton Nationals of Major League Lacrosse, as a volunteer assistant on his Syracuse staff. And Queener went from playing for Gait and assistant coach Regy Thorpe last summer to coaching alongside them this spring.‘They lost their four-year starting goalie and needed some extra help,’ Queener said, ‘so they called me up.’Queener got the job because of his playing experience in net, which gives him intricate knowledge of nearly every position on the field. As a player in 2007, Queener helped guide Albany to the NCAA tournament quarterfinals before leading the Rochester Rattlers to win the 2008 Steinfeld Cup during his rookie season in the MLL. Queener’s resume made him an ideal choice to teach the young goaltending duo of Alyssa Costantino and Kelsey Richardson.Under Queener’s guidance, Costantino has compiled an impressive 12-1 record to help the No. 2 Orange (13-2, 6-0 Big East) emerge as one of the top teams in the country this season. Richardson has been a capable backup, playing in 12 of SU’s 15 games thus far.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘(He) brings a great focus to that goalie position,’ Gait said, ‘and I think it’s helped our goalies improve immensely.’The new Syracuse coach brings the perfect background to the team’s coaching staff. While he spent the majority of his time at Albany in net, he also had the versatility to join the Great Danes’ attack at times.His playing career was marked by numerous dazzling plays.In Queener’s first game with the Great Danes, the goaltender carried the ball the length of the field to score a goal against defending national champion Johns Hopkins. In man-up situations, Queener was even more of an offensive threat. The goalie would trade his wide-pocketed goalkeeper stick out for a short stick and join the attack.In three seasons at Albany, Queener scored five goals and tallied five assists while running the point on extra-man opportunities. The goalkeeper’s offensive prowess even earned him a spot as a forward on National League Lacrosse’s Boston Blazers. In three seasons with the Blazers, Queener has scored eight times.‘He’s not just a goalie. He plays field too, so he knows every little thing,’ Syracuse attack Michelle Tumolo said. ‘So even if he’s goalie coach he’ll tell me ‘do this’, or he’s an amazing trick shot shooter so he’ll tell me, ‘try to do this.”Queener and Tumolo often compete in trick shot competitions during practice.The Orange has reaped the benefits of some of these competitions with some highlight-reel goals. Against Rutgers, Tumolo used a hidden ball trick to set up a goal. Against Dartmouth, she sent a pass through four defenders that resulted in another score.Throughout his career, Queener was known as a high-energy player, making him the right fit to help coach the Orange’s fast-paced, high-intensity style of play. And he has brought that same mentality to the defense led by the goalies this year.‘He just brings like a lot of energy and he’s been helping us as defenders, too,’ SU defender Becca Block said. ‘And just making sure specific words that the goalies will say to us, that helps us.’His most profound effect has been on the defensive end, teaching the young goalies and helping them find their comfort zone.Costantino has transformed from a seldom-used freshman into the nation’s best goalie in terms of save percentage. As for Richardson, the freshman has posted a solid .509 save percentage.Both goalkeepers came to SU as highly touted recruits, but their lack of experience was the biggest question hanging over this season. Thanks in large part to Queener, those questions have been answered.‘Brett’s really helped out their confidence, both of them, a ton,’ Block said. ‘Now, I don’t even notice that they’re goalies that we haven’t been playing with for the past years.’dbwilson@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read more

Jamaican Diaspora Mourns Death of Young Woman Who Died After Controversial…

first_imgThe Jamaican diaspora is mourning the tragic passing of Jodian Fearon, a pregnant woman, whose controversial death has gained local and international attention since last week. As reported by her family, the 23-year-old expectant mother went into labour on April 23 and was admitted to the Andrews Memorial Hospital (AMH) in Kingston, where she was already scheduled to have her C-Section. Fearon reportedly had flu-like symptoms including shortness of breath – a symptom of labor. She was denied services at the hospital after the medical staff feared that she had the highly contagious COVID-19. The hospitals and medical professionals involved have received widescale backlash from Jamaicans at home and abroad. The hospitals have also been accused of negligence, which ultimately resulted in Fearon’s death. Via social media, her mother, a Jamaican living in New York, had begged for the ministry of healthy to investigate and aid her a day before her death, but her requests went unanswered. A medical source at the UHWI told the Gleaner, “UHWI was consulted, and our team of specialists here were in talks with Andrews. We were told that the baby would be delivered at Andrews and the patient sent to us in the morning. UHWI was never asked to admit an expectant mother”. The following morning, on April 25, Fearon passed away from cardiac arrest. A day later, Fearon’s test results came back negative for COVID-19. As the doctor and family continued searching for a place for the woman to have her baby, Spanish Town Hospital, St Catherine offered to accept her. Fearon was forced to go through with natural birth although her personal doctor had concluded that she wouldn’t be able to do so, hence the scheduled C-section. After giving birth to her daughter, she was transferred to UHWI because of complications. Hospitals Playing The Blame Game While her family and friends in Jamaica and Florida mourn her passing, they have asked the diaspora for privacy. On Sunday night, the family said it intends to have an independent pathologist at her autopsy. They also asked that Fearon’s name not be used for partisan political means. Photo via Jodian Fearon’s mother on Twitter. “I have asked for a thorough investigation to take place and as soon as the results are available, which I hope will be very soon, we will make the information public. In the meantime, we will give whatever support is necessary to the newborn child who I understand is stable and in hospital,” Tufton said. She was then referred to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) but that facility also said they were unable to take her. The story of the woman came to light in a TVJ news broadcast on Friday night, April 24. Jodian’s death has confirmed shortcomings of the Jamaican healthcare system and has put the vulnerability of pregnant women during the pandemic at the forefront of the national news. In a statement, the Andrews Hospital has denied the accusations of negligence, saying that the UHWI is to be blamed for not answering appeals for assistance. Andrews has also blamed a team of anaesthesiologists working with Fearon’s gynaecologist for refusing to engage because of fears that the patient might have had COVID-19. The story, as reported by TVJ, said the pregnant woman who was in labour was taken to the country’s largest maternity facility, Victoria Jubilee Hospital (VJH) but they advised her doctor that they did not have room there to admit her. Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton expressed condolences to family and friends of Fearon. He says an investigation regarding her untimely passing was ordered. As an investigation is launched in Fearon’s death, two hospitals involved in her passing are now tossing blame back and forth regarding which medcial staff should be held responsible. The family has been urged to make no further comments, as it is now a legal matter. Jodian would have celebrated her 24th birthday on April 28.last_img read more

Read more