Gold Coast Deputy Mayor Donna Gates’ Pimpama property listed with “development potential”

first_imgDeputy Gold Coast Mayor Donna Gates. Photo: Jerad Williams Deputy Mayor Donna Gates has her Pimpama investment property on the market.GOLD Coast Deputy Mayor Donna Gates is selling her Pimpama investment property through her real estate agent son.Marketed as “development potential” there is scope for the buyer to build a five-storey unit block with the 818sq m property zoned special residential.Cr Gates said while the property was “a little way off” its development potential, Pimpama had experienced some of the strongest growth on the Coast in recent years.“Pimpama was always intended to be council’s biggest district centre,” she said.“The property is ideally located just off the M1 and will be close to the new district centre which starts construction next year. More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North10 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago40 Pimpama-Jacobs Well Rd, Pimpama.Cr Gates said choosing her son Matt Gates, who works for Ray White Prestige Gold Coast – Surfers Paradise, to market the property was a no-brainer.The four-bedroom Queenslander house offers dual accommodation options with three bedrooms, one bathroom, a kitchen, and living spaces upstairs and a separate self-contained apartment downstairs.“We lived there for four years and loved it,” Cr Gates said.“At the time it was overlooking cows and the grazing land. It’s actually a lovely old family home. If the property sells it will enable me to purchase a single-storey house on the northern Gold Coast.” The property is going to auction on April 13.center_img 40 Pimpama-Jacobs Well Rd, Pimpama.last_img read more

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Dutch Financial Assessment Framework ‘not worth effort’, expert says

first_imgFour years of debate on the Dutch Pensions Agreement and the proposed Financial Assessment Framework (FTK) have not been worth the effort, according to Peter Gortzak, one of the architects of the 2010 pensions agreement between the social partners and the government.In an interview with IPE sister publication FD Pensioen Pro, Gortzak – previously vice-chairman of union FNV and now policy head at asset manager APG – said: “What’s on the table now is exactly what we tried to prevent in 2010.”Elements of the planned FTK, such as an increase in buffer requirements, had already been proposed by the pensions regulator in 2009, he said.“This was the reason why I and Kees Oudshoorn of employers’ organisation VNO-NCW started the discussion about the Pensions Agreement, as we realised those DNB proposals would turn out to be detrimental for the pensions outcome and/or lead to a significant increase in contributions,” he said. The 2010 agreement was meant to end nominal guarantees and give pension funds leeway for inflation-proof investments.This ‘real pension contract’ is not to become law.Gortzak, while acknowledging that the exact FTK proposals are not known yet, stressed that the essence of the accord – offering an alternative for the required nominal guarantee of 97.5% – “disappeared”.As a consequence, Gortzak’s initial fear that failure of the Pensions Agreement could stifle indexation for as much as a decade may yet be realised, he warned.“The buffer increase in the new FTK is a wave pushing forward the indexation options,” he said. But Gortzak said there was still hope.“The Ministry of Social Affairs has told me it has succeeded in eliminating the investment dilemma of offering nominal guarantees while generating sufficient returns,” he said, immediately adding that he questioned how this could be achieved.“It seems to me there is hardly any margin for this, as the 97.5% nominal guarantee remains in the proposals,” he said. In the opinion of the former union boss, the failure of the Pensions Agreement and the real pensions contract is a consequence of the “unfortunate framing of uncertainties” that would come with it.“The parties involved kept on insisting the nominal framework meant certainty, but look at all the right cuts that had to be applied,” he said.He also cited fear of lawsuits over ownerships rights.“However,” he added, “it is clear that merging existing and new pension rights would not have caused a problem.”last_img read more

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Mark Edward Dunn

first_imgMark Edward Dunn, 45, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away Wednesday August 12, 2020 in Cincinnati, Ohio.He was born January 28, 1975 in St. Petersburg, FL, son of James G. Dunn and Pamela (Slayback) Griffith.Mark enjoyed the outdoors and wildlife. He loved fishing, swimming in the creek and camping. Mark enjoyed fixing things, he helped all the neighbors. He was extremely compassionate, he would give anything for anyone, he was very selfless. Mark enjoyed spending time with his children, and he loved to be with Glory and Rosie.Mark is survived by his father, James “Gary” Dunn, Aurora, IN., mother, Pam (Shawn) Griffith of Asheville, NC; fiancé, Diana Davis of Aurora, IN.; children, Samantha Dunn of Asheville, NC, Steven Dunn of Dupont, IN, Sierra Dunn of Asheville, NC, Scotty Dunn of Brandon, FL, Glory Davis of Aurora, IN, Rosie Davis of Aurora, IN; siblings, Monica Marino of Bennington, IN, Marti (Daniel) Abbey of Montgomery, TX, and Michael (Carrie) Land of Brandon FL.Services will be held at the convenience of the family.Contributions may be made to the Charity of choice. You may call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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PSA hosts Mexican consulate

first_imgOn Wednesday evening, the USC Political Student Assembly hosted a panel discussing the current state of U.S.-Mexico relations.Across the Border · The Consul General of Mexico in Los Angeles Carlos M. Sada spoke about U.S.-Mexico relations on Wednesday evening. – Ralf Cheung | Daily TrojanThe discussion featured Carlos M. Sada, the consul general of Mexico in Los Angeles as well as Stephen Cheung, director of international trade for Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. Two USC professors also participated in the event, moderator Carol Wise of the School of International Relations and Dr. Pamela K. Starr, director of the U.S.-Mexico Network at USC.Sada began the discussion with a presentation of the economic relationship between Mexico and the U.S. He stated that despite a sometimes tenuous relationship, Mexico’s connection with the United States has improved.“I think now there is a very good spirit of cooperation and collaboration and willingness to understand each other much better,” Sada said.He also cautioned, however, that many issues continue to exist between the two countries.“We have been partners — mainly with a very solid partnership — as of 1994 when NAFTA was signed,” Sada said. “We have a very unique and strategic relationship that is sometimes not well understood.”NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, was signed in 1994 and created the world’s largest free trade area between Mexico, the United States and Canada.“We Mexicans and Americans are not informed about each other,” Sada said. “We need to do much, much better.”One issue he highlighted was the lack of foreign students from Mexico. He stated that although about 750,000 foreign students study in the United States every year, only 14,000 are from Mexico.“That is why we are invigorating the academic relationship between the United States and Mexico,” he said.Starr also spoke of the importance of Mexico to the United States.“No country has a greater impact on the daily lives of Americans than Mexico,” Starr said. “Mexico matters to jobs, to wages, to public health, to environmental protection, to energy security, as well as to the demographic construction of the United States.”Cheung stated that Garcetti’s office was looking forward to broadening trade relations with Mexico.“Between Mexico City and Los Angeles alone, according to the Brookings Institution, in 2012 there was $2 billion of trade between just those two cities,” he said.Students at the event were interested in the consul’s presentation.Kayla Caldwell, a sophomore majoring in international relations and economics, said she learned new information about USC’s outreach in Mexico.“I came because it’s always a good opportunity to hear a consul speak,” Caldwell said. “I’ve never been to Mexico so I don’t know much about the region, but one thing I learned that was interesting was that there are so many engineering students from Mexico at USC in the program.”Priya Gupta, a senior majoring in international relations (global business), also found the trade aspect of the discussion interesting.“I thought it was a really great presentation — learning about the developing relationship that the consul and the mayor’s office are trying to establish between Mexico City and Los Angeles,” Gupta said.last_img read more

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