Day 3 at the Open

first_imgPadraig Harrington, Darren Clarke and Shane Lowry all missed the cut. Jordan Spieth is the man to catch into today’s third round at the Open Championship.The American two-time major champion has a two-shot lead at six-under ahead of teeing off at five-to-four this afternoon.Rory McIlroy is back out at twenty-five-past-three from one-under. Photo © – Tipp FMlast_img

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UPROAR AS HSE REMOVE ISLAND’S ONLY FULL-TIME NURSE

first_imgAn emergency meeting is to be held on Arranmore Island tonight after a decision to remove the island’s only full-time nurse.Arranmore IslandThe HSE has taken the decision to replace the current Public Health Nurse, Susan McGarvey, with a part-time registered nurse on the Donegal island.The action has led to anger among the island’s 500 strong population. Chairman of the local Co-op Jerry Early described the situation as “ludicrous.”“Like many others I am appalled that such steps are being considered. In my role as Chairman of the Coop and Island development, I would like to call a public meeting to discuss how best the people of Arranmore should respond to this ludicrous decision.“I am calling on all concerned members of the community to attend this very important meeting, and from this we shall formulate a plan,” he said.Mr Early said he contacted the island’s here TDs Dinny McGinley, Thomas Pringle and Pearse Doherty about the situation. “Deputy McGinley did return my call, however I am Still awaiting replies from Deputies Pringle And Doherty. I am of the opinion that if they are not willing to come to us, then we can go to them. I will also be contacting all our local councillors, and our MEP Pat the Cope inviting their input in this very important matter.”And he added “Our community has taken more than our fair share of cuts and we are not prepared to take anymore.”The meeting takes place tonight in the island community centre at 8pm.  UPROAR AS HSE REMOVE ISLAND’S ONLY FULL-TIME NURSE was last modified: January 25th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Arranmore IslandHSEJerry EarlymeetingNURSElast_img read more

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Humans Excel at… Please Wait… Patience

first_imgHere’s another thing that distinguishes humans from animals: patience.  Current Biology usually has a “Quick Guide” feature on some aspect of biology.  In the latest issue, patience was the patient.  First of all, what is it?Humans and other animals often make decisions that trade off present and future benefits.  Should a monkey eat an unripe fruit or wait for it to ripen?  Should I purchase the iPhone at its debut or wait for the price to drop in a few months?  In these dilemmas, large gains often require long waits, so decision makers must choose between a smaller, sooner reward and a larger, later reward.Animals experience these tradeoffs all the time, particularly when foraging for food.  A Clark’s nutcracker (a Western bird) can, for instance, store 33,000 seeds for later consumption, “that is 33,000 decisions to delay gratification.”  But being impulsive can have its payoffs, too.  “He who hesitates is lost,” a proverb says.  If you don’t snatch at the seed in front of you, it could fall into the river.    Following several questions and answers about patience (how it is measured, how animals measure up, etc.) came the question of interest to the human animal: “Are humans uniquely patient?”The most extreme examples of nonhuman animal patience pale in comparison to the levels of patience seen in humans.  Rather than waiting for only seconds or minutes, humans will wait days, weeks, months or even years for gains.  Is this a true cognitive divide?  The answer is yes and no.  In one sense, comparing the human and nonhuman experimental work is like comparing apples and oranges because the methodologies differ so greatly.  Repeated choices with all real rewards and time delays may yield different results from one-shot choices with hypothetical rewards and delays.  When tested in a manner similar to other animals, human subjects look similar to (or sometimes even more impulsive than!) chimpanzees.    Thus, in certain situations humans show similar levels of patience as other primates.  Yet, clearly situations exist in which humans are much more patient than other animals.  It is difficult to imagine even chimpanzees investing in the future in a way comparable to depositing money into a retirement account 30-40 years before receiving a return.  Nonetheless, we know that, for instance, many species show impressive abilities for future planning.  Western scrub jays can plan for their breakfast in the morning.  Monkeys and apes, especially chimpanzees, strategically invest in relationships with group members to climb the political ladder of their dominance hierarchies.  Though these species lack the complex language and symbolic systems (such as money and legal contracts) that allow humans to work over vast temporal horizons, they do demonstrate a flexible means of dealing with the future.  Perhaps the recent surge in interest in animal patience will tell us whether long-term patience is a uniquely human virtue.In short, put your money into an IRA instead of investing in a Monkey Bank. 1.  Jeffrey R. Stevens and David W. Stephens, “Quick Guide: Patience,” Current Biology, Volume 18, Issue 1, 8 January 2008, Pages R11-R12.They missed the whole point.  Human patience is a virtue, not a trait.  The fact that animals (and humans) may have instincts that work in a raw-biological context tells us nothing about the rationality and virtue behind human patience.  If it were merely instinctive, it would not require training and education and conscious choice.  If it were a biological trait, we would not see so many exceptions.    Humans have the capacity for long-term gratification because we were made in the image of God.  That is the only explanation that makes sense for the ability to wait for payoff for decades, or a lifetime.  That is what explains parents denying their gratification for the sake of their children, so that they will be able to have opportunities they never had.  And that is what enables a soul to deny itself till death for a joy in a future life, following the example of Christ, “who for the joy that was set before Him endured the cross, despising the shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God” (Hebrews 12:2).    We are animals, but we are not mere animals.  All theists recognize we are rational animals; it’s not like they believe humans float above the ground.  We have stomachs and sex organs and biological urges like the rest of biology.  That curious blend of body and soul is what makes our lives so interesting and challenging.  We were made for an unseen reality that can override our natural urges.  That is why we have need of patience.  That is why we are admonished to “consider Him who endured such hostility from sinners against Himself, lest you become weary and discouraged in your souls” (v.3).    Having a biological propensity like the animals to weigh the costs and benefits of immediate vs delayed gratification does in no way diminish the unique capacity of humans for patience, nor does a listing of the misdeeds of impulsive or diseased individuals who act only according to their animal natures.  Indeed, try to imagine a chimpanzee investing in an IRA for 40 years.  Without a soul, with its rational capacity for language, choice and wisdom, such capabilities would be unexplainable.  Current biology demonstrates it.(Visited 58 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Tata to increase Neotel stake

first_img25 June 2008Indian multinational Tata Communications has announced its intention to acquire a further 30% interest in South Africa’s second landline operator Neotel, from the state-owned enterprises Eskom and Transnet.Upon completion of the transaction, Tata Communications and Tata Africa, both controlled by the Tata Group, will become the major shareholder in Neotel, with an effective 56% stake.“This agreement is subject to the fulfilment of certain conditions precedent, some of which have a period of up to 180 days to be fulfilled,” Tata communications says in a statement this week.The other shareholders of Neotel are Nexus, Communitel and Two Telecom Consortium.Neotel introduced its first consumer offering in April this year, with their NeoConnect bundle which includes 1 000 Neotel to Neotel voice minutes, 50 Neotel to Neotel SMS’s, an email account and free internet access up to 10 gigabytes of data for a monthly charge of R599.The company is also providing the optical fibre backbone for the newly established South African National Research Network (Sanren), and will also operate the local landing station of the majority African-owned Seacom cable that will link southern and eastern Africa with India and Europe.Tata Africa Holdings, situated in Johannesburg, is the company which holds the Tata Group’s interests in 10 countries across the continent, with collective investments of over US$100-million.SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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AT&T unleashes drones to aid in Hurricane Harvey relief

first_imgRelated Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Amanda Razani Follow the Puck AI: How it’s Impacting Surveillance Data Storagecenter_img Tags:#AT&T#climate change#drones#featured#Hurricane Harvey#Internet of Things#IoT#natural disaster#Smart Cities#smart city#top As residents on or near the coast of Texas continue to try to pick up the pieces of devastation brought on by Hurricane Harvey, the ability to communicate to the outside world has become more and more important. Yesterday, AT&T deployed a fleet of 46 drones to inspect areas in South Texas that have been impacted.The key goals for the deployment were to check out all the towers, determine the network impact and ensure that customers continue to be able to speak to their loved ones.  A total of 26 drones were sent the day before, prior to sending out the 46 drones yesterday.  AT&T has an additional 58 drones on standby if needed.See Also: Amazon’s drones will tell you when your house needs workIn natural disaster situations such as this one, drones can often be utilized to inspect areas that aren’t accessible to cars or trucks due to flooding. The use of drones allows for quicker access to these inaccessible areas that could not be inspected otherwise. They can also see parts of the towers that people can’t reach when climbing or see from observing from the ground level.  They also speed up the inspection process of towers overall, because more towers can be studied in a shorter amount of time, freeing up time for making repairs.AT&T said “Drones can take HD video and photos of a cell site, giving us a birds’ eye view of the tower. This offers high-quality visuals of equipment, components, and cabling so our engineers can remotely view cell sites safely from the ground – all in real time.”Further help in the worksIn addition to the two flights of drones, AT&T plans to deploy 2 Satellite Cell on Wheels (Sat COLTS) to Beaumont, TX.  These will be joining additional assets that are already in place.  AT&T is planning to send 12 more to assist customers and first responders located in that area, due to the second landfall of Tropical Storm Harvey.Customers who live in these impacted areas will be receiving credits for extra data, voice and text charges, and prepaid credits for extra voice and text charges from the company.Follow this link to see drone footage shared by AT&T:  https://ql.mediasilo.com/#ql/59a73367e4b0b55905b47c40/ec1edd79-9041-419b-a5a1-45a0d480164a A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

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