Hugh Calkins, former Overseer, Corporation member

first_imgFormer Harvard Board of Overseers and Corporation member Hugh Calkins ’45, J.D. ’49, died at his home in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, on Aug, 4.Calkins served on Harvard’s Board of Overseers from 1966 to 1968 and was a member of the Harvard Corporation from 1968 to 1985. Then-President Derek Bok awarded him an honorary doctor of laws degree in 1986 in recognition and appreciation of his two decades of service to the University.“Hugh was one of the three Corporation members who came to see me on a snowy night at the end of 1970 to offer me the presidency. He was certainly a model Corporation member,” Bok said.Henry Rosovsky, who succeeded Calkins on the Corporation, believes Calkins deserves credit for helping create a more open atmosphere for the Corporation across the University.“Hugh was on the Corporation during a very difficult time at Harvard: the 1960s. He was unique in that he extended himself to everyone and spent time with students, as a result of which he made the Corporation and other governing boards more visible. Considering Harvard’s traditions at the time, that was a tremendous service and one of his main achievements.”Born in Newton, Mass., Calkins’ undergraduate years at Harvard were interrupted by service in the Air Force during World War II. He later attended Harvard Law School and was president of the Harvard Law Review.Following graduation he clerked for Justice Learned Hand of the New York Circuit Court and Justice Felix Frankfurter of the U.S. Supreme Court before joining the Cleveland firm of Jones, Day, where he ultimately became senior partner and head of the firm’s tax division. Calkins was active in national legal circles throughout his career, most notably serving as deputy director of President Eisenhower’s Commission on National Goals.Calkins’ experience on the Goals Commission launched his longtime commitment to, and eventual second career in, education. He returned to Cleveland to found Plan for Action by Citizens for Education (PACE) and served on the Cleveland Board of Education from 1965 to 1969.Following his retirement from Jones, Day, Calkins earned a teaching certificate and devoted several years to teaching in inner-city schools in Cleveland. He also managed Initiatives in Urban Education (IUE), a foundation organized for Calkins by his children that is dedicated to improving student achievement outcomes in Cleveland public schools. In that role, Calkins was instrumental in helping found Citizens Academy, a charter school near University Circle that has since gained recognition as one of the state’s highest-achieving charter schools.A September memorial service will be held in Ohio. Remembrances of Hugh Calkins may be shared at http://hughcalkinsremembrances.wordpress.com/about/.last_img read more

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Harvard yield highest since 1960s

first_imgNearly 84 percent of students admitted to the Class of 2021 have chosen to matriculate at Harvard College. The last time the yield reached this level was in 1969, when 83.1 percent of the Class of 1973 chose to attend.“Many changes at Harvard over the past decade have greatly enriched the undergraduate experience,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid. “In addition, Harvard’s deep commitment to financial aid has expanded access to promising students from all economic backgrounds.”As students share their reasons for coming to Harvard, they often mention the four-fold increase in the number of small freshman seminars to 130; an augmented advising system that doubles the number of freshman advisers to more than 400 and includes 200 peer advising fellows and 60 resident proctors; expanded research opportunities with close faculty collaboration; the creation of more than 40 secondary fields (minors); many more options for study abroad; the new John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and a rich array of new possibilities in the humanities, including a concentration in Theater, Dance, and Media, as well as the opening of the new Harvard Art Museums and re-vitalized theater opportunities through the Office for The Arts and the American Repertory Theater.“Students are also excited about the opportunities available under the ‘One Harvard’ concept,” said Fitzsimmons. “Many extraordinary resources are available to undergraduates across the entire University—at Harvard’s graduate schools and the affiliated research institutions and hospitals.”“The students who will be enrolling here in August are more economically diverse than those in last year’s freshman class,” said Sarah D. Donahue, Griffin Director of Financial Aid, sharing that two-thirds of the entering class applied for financial aid; nearly 24 percent qualified for the low-income portion of the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative; more than 19 percent requested application fee waivers; 17 percent are eligible for Pell Grants; and 15 percent are first-generation college students.“One in five Harvard families has an annual income less than $65,000 and pays nothing toward the cost of the student’s education. Families with incomes up to $150,000 with typical assets pay 10 percent or less of their annual incomes,” said Donahue. “Many families with higher incomes also qualify for assistance depending on individual circumstances. More than half of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid, and their families pay an average of only $12,000. And students are never required to take out loans to cover the cost of their education.”Harvard is committed to ensuring that all students take full advantage of their college experience. In addition to receiving grant aid to cover the basic cost of attendance, Harvard provides more than $6 million in additional funding annually to aided students, supporting everything from new winter coats to music lessons to studying abroad to public service internships to research experiences in a lab.“Harvard’s neediest students also receive a $2,000 ‘start up’ grant to help ease their transition to college and allow them to explore the vast opportunities available to Harvard students during the school year and summer,” said Fitzsimmons. “This made an enormous difference this past year to students who received the grant, and we heard many positive things about the ‘start up’ grants from the students who will join us in the Class of 2021.”“Nearly 50 percent of the matriculants are women: 49.6 percent compared to 47.8 percent last year,” said Marlyn E. McGrath, director of admissions. “In addition, a record 13.2 percent are African Americans.”Intended academic concentrations remained similar to last year’s with an increase in social scientists, a decrease in those undecided, and minor fluctuations in the rest. Geographical origins of the Class of 2021 are also similar to last year’s Class of 2020.“We are enormously grateful to all the faculty members, students, and alumni who reached out to prospective members of the Class of 2021 throughout the year and during ‘Visitas,’ our visiting program in April,” said McGrath. “They make the critical difference in our ability to enroll the nation’s and the world’s most outstanding students each year.”Recruiting for next year’s Class of 2022 began in February with mail and email outreach. Staff will visit 70 locations in the United States this month and another 80 during the fall in addition to some international travel. Nearly 55,000 students and family members will attend these presentations and another 47,000 will visit Harvard during the course of the year.last_img read more

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Jamestown Man Indicted In Connection With July Fatal Stabbing

first_imgMAYVILLE — A Chautauqua County Grand Jury has indicted a Jamestown man on a charge of second-degree murder in connection with a stabbing last month. A Chautauqua County Court Clerk tells WNYNewsNow that Carl W. Sorenson, 28, was indicted on Thursday. Sorenson was arraigned Monday in front of Judge David Foley and plead not guilty. The Clerk adds that bail was set at $350,000 cash/$700,000 property bond.The next scheduled date is October 5 at 10:30 am for an Omnibus hearing.A motion dismissing the second-degree murder charge against Jamestown man Carl Sorenson was denied during a preliminary hearing in Jamestown City Court July 17. Public Defender Ned Barone entered the motion on behalf of Sorenson, saying that the defendant is “entitled to a preliminary hearing.”Chautauqua County First Assistant District Attorney Derek Gregory, however, says there’s “no basis” for a dismissal. Gregory says the District Attorney’s Office is proceeding to a Chautauqua County Grand Jury with the case.District Attorney Patrick Swanson will be handling the prosecution.Jamestown Police charged Sorenson in the death of 23-year-old Brandon Holland who was stabbed in the chest while walking on the sidewalk along North Main Street between East 4th and East 5th Streets around 10:14 p.m. July 6.Holland was taken to UPMC Chautauqua Hospital where he died of his injuries.Sorenson, according to police, is also a New York State Parolee. Officers say he was taken into custody July 7 by investigators at his apartment on Washington Street in Jamestown.A reward, meanwhile, is being offered for information that leads to the arrest of a man wanted by Jamestown Police and the U.S. Marshalls in connection with the case.According to Buffalo Crime Stoppers, $2,500 is being offered for information on Jason Talley.Jamestown Police Captain Robert Samuelson tells WNYNewsNow’s Matt Hummel that Talley is wanted in connection with the Brandon Holland murder case.Talley is believed to be in the Buffalo or Rochester area. Samuelson confirmed on Tuesday that police are still actively looking for Talley.Anyone with information on his whereabouts is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at (716) 867-6161.Tips can also be submitted by dowloading the free Crime Stoppers Mobile App in the Apple App store or Google Play store.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Former cricket captain Michael Clarke comes in to bat for Noosa

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:43Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:43 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels576p576p432p432p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenMichael Clarke opens batting for new Noosa Real Estate ‘Game Changer’03:44FORMER Aussie cricket captain Michael Clarke, who has done his fair share of real estate deals, has come in to bat for Noosa.Mr Clarke, who was in Noosa last night for the launch of a new business on the Sunshine Coast, says good advice can be a game-change.He recommended buyers seek out professional support before putting their cash to work in real estate.He made the comments at the official launch of realty firm Reed & Co in the tourism and property hotspot.More than 150 people were at the party hosted by award-winning agent Adrian Reed, including Clarke, Anthony Bell – celebrity accountant, and television presenter Kelly Landry.Mr Clarke said there were similarities between business and sport.“You need good advice, guidance and great people to support you in making the right decisions,” he said.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus16 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market16 hours agoMr Bell told the crowd that he and Ms Landry fell in love with Noosa after visiting for the first time in 2017 – so much so they bought home worth more than $10m there.“My wife and I have travelled extensively throughout the world and we just love Noosa,” he said. “Our children adore it too.”The Bell founded charity, The Loyal Foundation, received $6000 donation on the night courtesy of a generous auction bidder who won a five-hour luxury experience including a private return Ghost Air helicopter trip from Noosa to the Bribie Island Sandstone Point Hotel for four people.last_img read more

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Gary Neville’s Valencia ready to fight Liverpool for summer transfer target

first_imgSevilla and Valencia have joined Liverpool in the race to land Anderlecht ace Dennis Praet.The Belgian midfielder has been heavily linked with a summer switch to Anfield, with Jurgen Klopp keen to add another playmaker to his ranks.But now, according to Superdeporte, the Reds face competition from Sevilla and Valencia – bossed by former Manchester United star Gary Neville – for the the 21-year-old’s signature.Both Spanish clubs are understood to have scouted Praet since the turn of the year and are readying summer bids for him.Praet’s contract with Anderlecht expires in 2017 and the player has stalled on renewing terms with the Belgian giants.Anderlecht are now reluctantly willing to sell Praet this summer and are already lining up discussions with clubs about a transfer. Anderlecht ace Dennis Praet [right] in action for the club 1last_img read more

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Buchón cantina Spritz cocktails to dine for

first_imgBuchón was the first place I tasted the Aperol Spritz, months before it became fashionable around San José.In fact, I tried it before they even officially opened their doors in May 2017. Their first guests were friends, and friends of friends, like me. The memory of that first Aperol Spritz is so vivid that I can still taste the cocktail’s bubbly tanginess.The Spritz is fizzy because of prosecco — Italian white wine that’s usually sparkling — and you can keep it casual and mix it with some other Italian aperitivos like the Aperol, Campari or a digestive like the Lazzaroni… or you could misbehave with some classic recipe and add it to an American Negroni.“A Spritz is a cocktail with low-alcohol. You could use any amaro, or almost any liquor. There’s not a fixed formula, you can bend the rules,” said owner and chef, Luis Protti. “A little prosecco can water down the drink, and make it refreshing and bubbly.”Those bubbly memories also include the bocas I ordered: a cheese and meat platter, toast and pâté and some olives.It’s easy to write about drinking without having to write about the food at most bars, but I can’t explain the Buchón experience without mentioning the food. I eat a lot in there — and I mean it in actual quantity, not frequency. Photo courtesy Diego Matarrita“We still don’t know if we cook food to drink or we mix drinks as an excuse to eat,” Protti saidSo, last time I went over for a drink I asked for the steak and fries — they recommend you add a fried egg over most of their hot dishes and I usually like to follow sound advice. But I didn’t order alone: I invited two friends who had never visited Buchón.One of them ordered their special meatballs in tomato sauce over fries, wisely accompanied by the fried egg topping. The other friend asked for chorizo and toast with Brie cheese and homemade red onion jam. We shared the whole feast, which later included an order of fries and fresh burrata with bread.Then came the cocktails: the now famous Aperol Spritz, a gin and tonic, and, for me, a Lazzaroni Spritz. The latter is a not-yet-on-the-menu cocktail that uses prosecco and soda just like the Aperol Spritz, but the Aperol is replaced with Lazzaroni amaretto and tangerine juice.All three are delicious to savor while dining.Right after we finished eating, we continued drinking some of their most popular cocktails. The waiter, Javier, brought an Americano, an old-fashioned and a Negroni, all of them prepared with Protti’s three-ingredient rule — classic cocktails don’t need anything more than the best few ingredients, he insists.I seldom complain out loud that I don’t like that much the Negroni but this time I said it: it’s too sweet and too bitter. I was hoping for the waiter to frown, but all he did was bring prosecco to mix it with. The negroni at Buchón (Photo courtesy of Diego Matarrita)“It’s called Negroni sbagliato,” Protti later said, adding that it translates as “imperfect” or “incorrect” Negroni.Protti hopes they will have five new cocktails over the next few weeks. Even though not all of them will have bubbles, they were all designed to be the perfect companion to a hearty meal with a fried egg on top.“We want more bubbles,” Protti said about Buchón’s mission.“Maybe, for generations, we have kept them for special occasions. Now we realize there is a whole range of bubbles we can’t drink whenever we want to.”I’m not speaking for every palate, but for me and my friends, bubbles were all we needed to have a lovely dinner with plenty of Buchón’s greatest dishes.My take on fizzy cocktails is that they are great for dining, that’s about it.Natalia Diaz is a freelance journalist. She likes her reading the same way she likes her music: with a side of gin tonic. Natalia just started this new liquid diet and she’s writing all about it. You can follow her on Twitter @natdiaze. Facebook Comments Related posts:Can it still be agua de sapo if El Portón Rojo mixes it with rum? Cabra Negra’s warm rompope foams its way until Christmas Two winning drinks with Costa Rica’s best bartender at Mil948 A hangover, brunch and a classic bloody mary at Mazalast_img read more

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