PREMIUMIndonesia races against time for 2020 London Book Fair

first_imgForgot Password ? #LondonBookFair London-Book-Fair Literature #literature books #books Indonesia #Indonesia National-Book-Committee Tourism-and-Creative-Economy-Ministry Google Log in with your social account Facebook LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Indonesia has less than a month to prepare for the prestigious London Book Fair (LBF), as the government only recently made the decision confirming its participation.The 2020 LBF will be held from March 10 to 12 at the Olympia exhibition center in London. More than 25,000 publishers, booksellers, librarians and literary agents from over 100 countries are set to attend the fair, making it the second-biggest exhibition after the Frankfurt Book Fair.Indonesia has participated in the event since 2015 with the help of the National Book Committee (KBN) under the Education and Culture Ministry. In 2018, the now-defunct creative economy agency (Bekraf) took the lead after Indonesia was chosen to be the market focus at the book fair.Bekraf, however, was merged into the Tourism and Creative Economy Ministry in a Cabinet restructuring last October, with a number of senior ministry offic… Topics :last_img read more

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DOH records 35% drop in firecracker injuries

first_imgHealth Secretary Francisco Duque said there was a 35 percent decline in fireworks-related injuries nationwide from Dec. 21, 2019 to Jan. 1, 2020. “We expect the number of cases to increase as there are late reports still coming from the regions,” Duque said. “Most additional injuries at this time come from children picking up unexploded fireworks from the streets.” MANILA – The numberof injuries due to fireworks has decreased in the run-up toNew Year’s Day 2020, according to the Department of Health (DOH). He added that most of the cases were recorded in Metro Manila. Duque renewed its call for a total ban in firecrackers use in the country as he admitted that more data is needed to support a draft bill on an absolute ban on any kind of firecrackers. Duque noted the 164 total of fireworks-related injuries tallied was lower than the 251 recorded in the same period last year but the numbers could still rise until the DOH ends its monitoring on Jan. 6. “Every firecracker, whether legal or not, can be injurious. We hope the Duterte administration will be able to create a legacy of an absolute ban on fireworks so we’ll have zero injuries,” Duque said. “Maraming ligtas na paraan para makapag ingay.”/PN No reported deaths due to firecrackers so far, Duque said. “But overall, the National CapitalRegion has registered a 16 percent drop in the number of fireworks-relatedinjuries,” the DOH secretary said, adding that only four percent of thefireworks-related injuries required amputation as most of the injury cases werejust burn and eye injuries. Children play with sparklers at Divisoria market in Manila on Tuesday. Authorities have banned the use of dangerous firecrackers, prompting New Year revelers to buy safer alternatives, such as party horns and harmless firecrackers. ABS-CBN NEWS Based on DOH’s data, top causes of firecracker injuries were due to kwitis, lusis, fountain fireworks, and piccolo. Most of the injuries happened from streets and residential homes.last_img read more

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Poe’s Perspective: USC versus UCLA lacks high-level intensity of great college rivalries

first_imgJulia Poe is a senior writing about her personal connection to sports. Her column, “Poe’s Perspective,” runs weekly on Thursdays. The annual clash between these two powerhouse rivals is something to celebrate for a college basketball fan. Year in and year out, it’s a consistent event that eclipses any season records or Top-25 rankings. It really doesn’t matter if North Carolina is on track to another national championship, or if Duke has a fleet of freshman monsters like forward Zion Williamson. In any given year, on any given rivalry day, both teams have an equal chance of beating the other. Mrs. O’Neill was a bit of an outlier — her room was basically bathed in crimson and blue from October to March every single year — but that question was a fairly common icebreaker asked in classrooms from first grade on. Where I grew up, our teams were an intrinsic aspect of our identities. We split up by them to play dodgeball in elementary school gym class and wore jerseys for a day of spirit week in high school. Cheering for one of those three colleges — which most of my graduating class ended up attending — was so important that I can still remember, to this day, the college allegiances of almost all of the 70 kids in my grade at elementary school. I was hoping for this type of energy, this type of generations-old hatred, when I came to college. I had heard enough tales spun about the bad blood between UCLA and USC, and after watching two teams sharing a state battle it out in Kansas vs. Kansas State, I was ready to see just how much living in the same city upped the ante. After all, I was told that the two schools hated each other — enough to duct tape the statues on campus for rivalry week, enough to burn a bonfire yards high to simulate burning each other’s mascots. I thought I was signing up for a new type of sports-induced hatred and when I got to campus, I was ready to bask in it. But in my four years at USC, I’ve come to understand that the USC vs. UCLA rivalry, despite all the trash talk and traditions, is in the second tier of sports rivalries. It brings a dull consistency, for sure, a Saturday each football season to circle in order to properly plan for a tailgate. But the actual ferocity of the fandom isn’t at the same level as other schools or other teams, and that lack of fire has left me feeling somewhat left out, as I watch friends around the country bask in their senior years of rivalries. In the end, it doesn’t really matter why this rivalry hasn’t been all that compelling in recent years. The point still stands that our rivalry is second-rate at best, relegated to noon kick-off times and repeated as half-hearted jokes by professors. As my senior year comes to a close, I couldn’t help feeling a little jealous settling in for a true rivalry game like Duke and North Carolina, wondering what could have been, if USC hated UCLA just a little bit more. I don’t really have an answer to this question. Maybe it’s because those two schools are sequestered in a semi-rural area of North Carolina, with less to do than a bunch of college kids plopped in the dead center of one of the largest cities in the world. Maybe it’s because Duke and North Carolina have kept winning year after year with seasoned, Hall of Fame coaches at the helm, while USC and UCLA have watched their football and basketball teams flounder. Or maybe it’s because we’re both too focused on different sports — UCLA on basketball, USC on football — to breed a rivalry, since we never meet on common ground. So it’s different for state schools like Kansas and K-State, or Nebraska and Iowa. Blame it on the overabundance of wheat and corn fields and the lack of things to do; blame it on small-town ideals (even though I grew up in the suburbs) or the fact that the Midwest is obsessed with basketball. But that still doesn’t explain the ferocity of a rivalry like Duke and North Carolina, two schools that are as academically competitive as USC and UCLA, yet still hate each other much, much more. It’s hard to put a finger on the exact reason that the USC vs. UCLA rivalry feels lesser, but a lot of a it comes from where I grew up. When I was in third grade, my teacher (what’s up, Mrs. O’Neill?) went around the room at the start of one week and asked each of us who we cheered for — KU, K-State or Mizzou. She then rearranged the seating chart to put the KU fans in the front rows of the classroom, the K-State fans in the middle and the Mizzou kids in the very back for the rest of the week. We were 8 freaking years old. I grew up on this type of rivalry. It didn’t matter if it was Chiefs against Raiders or Kansas playing Mizzou; all of my teams hated the hell out of someone else, guaranteeing at least two great rivalry games per season. The beauty of one of these contests was only exacerbated by circumstances — the David and Goliath odds of my (often weaker) team facing a powerhouse or the thrill of watching a sub-zero game played outdoors. Wednesday night played host to one of the Christmas-like holidays of the NCAA men’s basketball season — UNC vs. Duke Part I, the first half of one of the most hate-filled, violently competitive games of the year.last_img read more

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