University announces pre-matriculation testing procedures for spring 2021 semester

first_imgThe Notre Dame COVID-19 Response Unit (CRU) outlined their policies for pre-matriculation testing for the upcoming spring 2021 semester in an email to students Monday.Undergraduate and professional students will be required to schedule an appointment to be tested at the University Testing Center as soon as they arrive on campus, the email said. Students may begin scheduling their appointment on Dec. 16 and are advised to do so by Dec. 18.The testing schedule will be staggered based on health and safety protocols.“Based on guidance from public health officials, appointments for on-campus students have been staggered to ensure that, to the extent possible, roommates do not move in on the same day and that no more than 20 percent of a given hall arrives on the same day,” the email said.Doctoral and masters students are not required to complete pre-matriculation testing because of their weekly participation in surveillance testing during their stay on campus during winter break. However, testing is encouraged and will be available to them.All students participating in pre-matriculation testing must self-isolate in their residence hall rooms or off-campus housing until their saliva test results come back. Students are required to use carryout for food or groceries and eat by themselves while they wait for their result.The University will inform students if these plans need to be adjusted due to changing conditions of the pandemic.“With the changing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, should the University need to adapt these plans in the coming weeks, we will communicate this information promptly,” the email said. “We continue to monitor conditions locally and nationally, and will make any needed adjustments to ensure the health and safety of everyone in our community.”Tags: COVID-19, covid-19 response unit, pre-matriculation testing, spring semester 2021, University of Notre Damelast_img read more

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Korger: Breaking down the Uthoff transfer controversy

first_imgAs it currenty stands, Jarrod Uthoff, who redshirted in his first year at Wisconsin, cannot transfer to 25 schools as dcided by Bo Ryan.[/media-credit]How long has it been since a player on the Wisconsin men’s basketball team transferred out of the program? Seriously, can anyone tell me?These were the questions I methodically repeated to every die-hard Badger fan I knew Tuesday. Every time, I received the same puzzled look, as various men of self-proclaimed sports wisdom (most close to my own age) scrunched up their faces in frustration at the revealed gap in their knowledge.Whatever the case, the Badgers have been bitten by the transfer bug this spring, as redshirt freshman Jarrod Uthoff’s request to leave the program became increasingly public this past week,  even being discussed in a segment on ESPN Radio’s “The Herd with Colin Cowherd.”But, like a spoiled gallon of milk that stinks up your fridge, the attention was for all the wrong reasons.Cowherd and others in the media have raised an outcry at the actions of Bo Ryan in placing seemingly harsh restrictions on where Uthoff can transfer. The list of no-no schools for the freshman includes every school in the Big Ten and ACC as well as Marquette and Iowa State.That’s 25 schools. And I thought my graduate school choices were limited.However, there are reasons behind Ryan’s decision to play the disciplinarian role similar to Dean Wormer in “Animal House” putting Delta Tau Chi on double-secret probation.The reason Ryan doesn’t want Uthoff to go to any Big Ten school is obvious. Think about it like this: Microsoft wouldn’t want a promising, upcoming employee who learned the system and company to go to Apple. There’s really nothing wrong with Ryan not wanting a player who learned inside the program to go to a team that he could potentially face two to three times in a given season.That’s why this situation isn’t even remotely similar to Wisconsin reeling in Ben Brust from his de-commitment to Iowa. Brust never spent a single season at Iowa like Uthoff did at Wisconsin, but rather sought to pull away from the Hawkeyes because they fired former head coach Todd Lickliter. Brust originally committed to Iowa prior to his senior year, so when Lickliter, the man who recruited him, was fired at the conclusion of the 2009-2010 season, Brust felt no reason to retain his commitment. Therefore, calling Bo Ryan hypocritical on this evidence is severely flawed.As far as the ACC restriction, one of the only plausible reasons I can come up with is that Ryan doesn’t want to risk facing an ACC-Big Ten challenge opponent that has Uthoff on it with an insider scouting report. The same line of thought goes with the Marquette restriction.But the blacklisting of Iowa State goes a bit deeper than a seasonal matchup. The Badgers are not scheduled to meet Iowa State anytime in the distant future, so perhaps Ryan has some notion that the Cyclones – a program under Fred Hoiberg that has been bolstered by several transfers in recent years – hoped to scavenge his loss.It would make sense after all, if Uthoff showed interest in Iowa State; Uthoff is a native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he led Jefferson High School to a Class 4A state tournament appearance while being named the 2011 Mr. Basketball of Iowa.Maybe Uthoff truly didn’t fit in to Ryan’s grinding style of offense. Perhaps Uthoff felt uncomfortable with the fact that the Badgers recruited and signed the talented Sam Dekker behind him, meaning Uthoff would have to fight with Dekker for playing time if the incoming freshman didn’t redshirt.Whatever the case, Ryan is making a message loud and clear throughout the country. If you come to Wisconsin, you’re expected to stay committed. While other coaches throughout college basketball have taken similar stances with restrictions on players transferring (albeit, without the sheer number of restricted schools in this instance) only to submit or regress on the decision after public pressure, Ryan has a reputation of sticking to his decisions, which may force Uthoff to leave with slim pickings.But is Ryan’s decision the right one? It’s understandable if the coach feels a bit spited. With Uthoff just recently announcing his transfer, the Badgers lose a considerable talent that looked to challenge Mike Bruesewitz for playing time at the three spot. Now, with the 2012 recruiting period over, the Badgers will be forced to wait another year and to address the loss of a player who was supposed to be a future starter in the program.Yet with all things set aside, Ryan should also do his best to get this matter taken care of as soon as possible. Not that Wisconsin basketball brings in the most heralded prep players, but this story could be a bit intimidating to interested high school recruits.Sometimes – as many of my fellow college students can relate – you don’t always know what you want or what’s best for you when making decisions at 17 and 18. Just remember, these basketball recruits have to make their college choices the same way you did, with that nagging uncertainty and stress of making the right decision of where to spend the next four years of their lives.Just like any college student may transfer if the school he attends isn’t the right fit, Uthoff should be allowed to do the same. I can understand the reasons for the restricted schools, but Ryan can beat any team in the conference or country with his style, regardless of what Uthoff would reveal. After all, it isn’t exactly a secret what Wisconsin plans to do every time it steps out on the court anyway.So when the time for the decision comes, Ryan should just let Uthoff go where he pleases. While nobody knows all of the details or the entire situation surrounding the transfer, Uthoff should not be punished for wanting to pursue his athletic dreams elsewhere.After all, if he’s the first notable player to leave Wisconsin since Sam Okey in 1998, I think Bo and the Badgers are doing just fine.Nick is a senior majoring in English and history. Have questions or comments about the column? Let him know at nkorger@badgerherald.comlast_img read more

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Essien’s energy reassures team mates – Salomon Kalou

first_imgChelsea and Ivory Coast star Salomon Kalou has re-emphasised the importance of Black Stars’ Michael Essien to the Chelsea team, saying he reassures the entire Chelsea squad.Kalou is in Accra with the Ivorian National team to play Benin at the Accra Sports stadium this Sunday after the 2012 African Cup of Nation’s qualifier between the two West African nations was relocated to Ghana due to the political unrest in Ivory Coast.In an interview with Citi FM, Kalou described his Chelsea teammate as a dedicated player who works for the team.He said Essien “always brings that positive energy working for the team, always doing great, hard work for the team so I think it is very important to have this kind of player in the team because he reassures the striker [and] the midfielders…He is an unselfish player who is going to fight for the team.”“[Essien] is my friend, my good friend so I am happy to see him back to top level. He had a difficult time with injury the past year so it’s good for the team – for Chelsea- to see Essien back in the team and also for himself because I think he deserves a better situation,” he stressed.Asked whether he sees Essien returning to the Black Stars in the near future, Kalou’s response was: “He is back to fitness now so I think, you know when you’ve been out for almost a year without playing football you don’t want to start playing every game and get tired again and go back. You have to have a good recovery so I think he will come when he thinks it is the right moment to come.” Since returning to full fitness in September last year, Michael Essien has sought permission to get over the disappointing injury that saw him miss the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.He has since not featured for the Black Stars even though he has played almost every game this season for Chelsea.Story by Derick Romeo Adogla/Myjoyonline.com/Ghanalast_img read more

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Wellington Police Department will be implementing ‘Click it or Ticket’ campaign on May 23

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (4) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. -1 Vote up Vote down Turkeyleg · 222 weeks ago What about a older car that didn’t come out with seat belts, can they ticket them? What about golf carts that are on the road? Many older cars just have a lap belt, what then? Since the cops can’t see the lap belts but stop them, isn’t that and illegal search? Just more government overreach trying to drum up arrest’s and money. Report Reply 0 replies · active 222 weeks ago -1 Vote up Vote down No Seatbelt EVER · 222 weeks ago Nice to see the Gestapo hard at it again funding the donuts. Report Reply 0 replies · active 222 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Citizen X · 222 weeks ago What about all the Law Enforcement tha I pass everyday that is always looking down and texting as well? Talking on the phone? Can we as citizens write them a ticket as well? What gives them the right? A Badge? I never wore seat belt growing up, none of us did. Your more lickly to get injured on highway driving at higher speeds than a little bump in city limits. Laws need to change instead of restrict choices. Report Reply 0 replies · active 222 weeks ago +3 Vote up Vote down Larry · 222 weeks ago The laws in most state is as follows: What ever the vehicle was equipped with is all that is required. So if it has no seat belts is legal but some states require installation of a lap belt. If is has only a lap belt that is legal and no requirement for shoulder belt. If you do get stopped and have the lap belt on you are good. It is not an illegal search since they don’t have to physically enter the care to check. Most states laws have exempted law enforcement and are allowed to use cellphones well driving for official use only. I don’t care for that, but that is the way it is. The only question I have is that they should click it or ticket it all the time. Everyone should remember that driving is a privilege not a right. Report Reply 0 replies · active 222 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Submitted to Sumner Newscow — Beginning on Monday, May 23, and continuing through Sunday, June 5, drivers can expect increased police presence on Wellington city streets as the Wellington Police Department joins almost 150 other law enforcement agencies in aggressively enforcing Kansas occupant restraint and other traffic laws as part of the 2016 Kansas Click It or Ticket campaign.  This activity is supported by a grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation.  Enforcement will occur around the clock.  Officers will be especially vigilant at night because the likelihood of seatbelt use at night is much lower than during the day and the percentage of unrestrained crash deaths soars much higher at night.Drivers can expect strict enforcement of both the Safety Belt Use Act and the Child Passenger Safety Act.  These acts require that all vehicle occupants must be appropriately restrained.  Law enforcement officers can stop vehicles and issue tickets when they observe front seat occupants, teens in any position, or children under the age of 14, riding without being properly restrained.  Occupants, ages 14 and over, are cited individually.  In the event that a passenger under the age of 14 is observed to be unrestrained the driver will be cited.  The fine for an adult violation is $10 (plus the time out for the traffic stop, during which the driver’s license number will likely be called in to dispatch).  The fine for a youth (14-17) violation is $60 (no court costs), while the driver’s fine for a child (0-13) restraint violation is $60 + a court cost charge of at least $98.Children under the age of four must be correctly secured in an approved child safety seat.  Children, ages four through seven, must be securely belted into an approved booster seat unless taller than 4 feet 9 inches or heavier than 80 pounds, in which case, the booster may be removed and the child belted in without it.  Children, ages eight through 13 must be safety-belted.   In addition, the act prohibits persons under the age of 14 from riding in any part of a vehicle not intended for carrying passengers, such as a pickup bed.  For answers to child safety restraint questions and the location of the nearest safety seat fitting station, or safety seat technician, contact the Kansas Traffic Safety Resource Office at 1-800-416-2522, or write ktsro@dccca.org.The aim of Click It or Ticket is simple:  to drastically reduce the number of preventable deaths and injuries that occur when unbelted drivers and passengers are involved in traffic crashes.  According to KDOT, fully 57% of those killed in crashes on Kansas roads are not belted in, while 93% of crash occupants who suffer no injuries of any kind are belted in.  So, in general, unrestrained occupants who are involved in a crash have, at most, only about a 7% chance of not suffering some degree of injury.  And all because drivers neglect to ensure that each occupant in their vehicle is properly restrained – an activity that requires only seconds to complete.  While seat belts may not always protect from serious or fatal injury, certainly no other piece of equipment within the vehicle provides more protection.Kansas’ overall adult seat belt compliance rate is 82% and ranges, by county, from 59% to 95%, with occupants in rural counties generally less likely to buckle up than those in urban counties.  According to KDOT, this rural-urban difference in seat belt rates is especially problematic because rural roadway conditions are, in general, less forgiving than those in urban areas and the consequences of driver misjudgment – such as unsafe speed and failure to buckle up – are likely to be more severe.  Picture, for example, two lanes, narrow shoulders, ditches on both sides, and random culverts waiting to snag vehicles leaving the roadway.  Or, consider the rollover crash, which is so much more prevalent on rural roadways than city streets.  One of the grimmest duties a police officer is called upon to perform is to work a crash where an unrestrained occupant is partially or completely ejected, and then crushed by the rolling vehicle.  It is easy to see why fully two-thirds of Kansas’ fatality crashes occur on rural roadways even though they see only one-third of all crashes.Kansans like to see their state as one which protects children, and it does well with its youngest ones, those aged 0-4, who are buckled in to child safety seats at the rate of 97%.  However, the percentage of properly restrained 5- to 13-year olds is only 82%.  Moreover, eight out of ten times when drivers, themselves, are unbelted, their child passengers are also unsecured.According to Chief Tracy Heath, “I want people in Wellington to remember that when they don’t buckle up themselves, or require their passengers to buckle up, they are, in effect, promising themselves and those passengers, along with family and friends not present, that no circumstance will arise that will trigger seat belt activation.  That the drivers they will encounter on the road are not going to be critically affected by drug or medical impairment, sleepiness, cell phone conversations, texting, sloshing coffee, the radio dial or kids fighting in the back seat.  Nor will there be animals in the road or a mechanical or other circumstance that will cause them to suddenly slow or veer out of their lane.”“I want people to know that, day or night, the Wellington Police Department is committed to aggressively ticketing violators of seat belt and child safety laws, as well as other traffic infractions – such as speeding and texting while driving – which make the need for occupant restraint so necessary.”Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

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