2016 Election Observer: Lloyd Mayer

first_imgLM: Students should be paying careful attention to the actual policy positions of the candidates, including whether their current positions appear to be sincere ones based on their ideological commitments and past positions or instead positions adopted simply to win the next election. Student should also educate themselves about the issues, so they can form independent opinions about important areas over which elected officials have significant influence, taking into account not only what policies will best help them economically but the moral dimensions of policy choices. Finally, students, like all citizens, need to take what they learn, and apply it not only in the ballot box, but in between elections through involvement with politically active organizations and government bodies. The media may turn most of its attention elsewhere after Nov. 8, but citizens should not.Tags: 2016 Election Observer, Republican convention LM: At the moment the biggest issue ​for many voters is the economy, including the apparent fragility of the economic recovery, the rapid pace of change in the workplace, and the resulting uncertainty for many workers and their families. Related concerns include immigration, education, and healthcare costs, but events could easily shift this picture. The most obvious example would be a major terrorist attack on U.S. soil, which could elevate national security and related issues such as immigration to the forefront.ROG: Taking it back to college campuses, particularly here at Notre Dame, primaries in many of our home states are coming up. What is something we, as college students, should be paying particular attention to? LM: If Trump does not have a majority of pledged delegates​, then the likely result of the first delegate vote at the Republican Convention will be no majority winner. ​I say ‘likely’ because some delegates, primarily Republican National Committee members from certain states, are not formally pledged and so are free to vote for the candidate of their choice, even in the first round. If there is no majority winner on the first vote, at that point delegates are technically released from their commitments based on the primary or caucus results of their state. Even so, many delegates may feel bound by those results for subsequent votes, while others will have been chosen in a manner that ensures their loyalty to the candidate for whom they voted in the first round. At this point it is therefore very difficult to predict the likely results. The key issue will be ​how far the leadership of the Republican party ​is willing to go to block a Trump nomination, which could include trying to change the rules I just described, so as to disadvantage Trump.ROG: In your research and opinion, what do you think will be the most important issue in the general election? Editor’s Note: Throughout the 2016 presidential campaign, The Observer will sit down with Notre Dame experts to break down the election and its importance to students. In this eighth installment, Associate News Editor Rachel O’Grady asked Notre Dame Law School professor of election law Lloyd Mayer about the possibility of a brokered GOP convention.Rachel O’Grady: Trump just pretty handily won a number of states [last night]. What does this mean for the Republican party down the road? What are the implications of a Trump nomination?Lloyd Mayer: Short-term, it makes it likely that Trump will have the most delegates going into the Republican Convention, but it is less clear whether he will have a majority of delegates. If Trump is nominated, it does not mean that the Democratic Party nominee will definitely win — no one is willing to make such predictions anymore, given how wrong just about everyone was about where the race would be at this point. But his presence at the top of the ticket will alienate some voters who otherwise would vote Republican, likely hurting turnout for Republicans and negatively impacting Republican candidates across the board. If he loses, the Republican Party will have a lot of ground to make up with voters before the next presidential election.ROG: Hillary is gaining serious momentum, but Sanders could win the nomination yet. What are your predictions?LM: Much smarter people than me have been dead wrong when making predictions for this election year, so I am hesitant to claim any ability to foresee the future here. Clinton will have to keep pushing hard to cross the finish line, and it is still possible that some unexpected development or disclosure could derail her campaign. The odds are in her favor, but it will not be over until it’s over. ROG: The potential for a brokered convention is becoming increasingly more likely. Could it happen? What’s the result if it does?last_img read more

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Fatigue strikes Syracuse in 2-2 draw with New Hampshire

first_img Published on October 11, 2014 at 9:01 pm Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Watching his players skate up and down the ice during the third period and overtime, Syracuse head coach Paul Flanagan could tell they were tired.A team that had put 30 shots on net through the first two periods failed to get to pucks and spent most of its time during the final two frames in the defensive zone.“It’s a wake-up call for some of them that really struggled to perform later in the game today,” Flanagan said. “They were out of energy, so that’s something we’ll have to take care of.”Almost halfway through the third period, New Hampshire (1-3-1) tied Saturday’s game at the Tennity Ice Pavillion, 2-2. That score would hold until the end and for the second night in a row, Syracuse (1-1-2) finished with a tie.Again, the Orange failed to ever take more than a one-goal lead, despite having the chances. Much like Friday’s game against Northeastern, SU couldn’t close it out and let its opponent tie the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I was really disappointed with our squad,” Flanagan said after Saturday’s draw. “You got to learn how to put a team away … I think we were lucky to get out of there with a tie.”Just a minute and a half in, freshman Stephanie Grossi played a puck near the corner with two defenders on her and passed it to junior Nicole Renault, who was crashing the net. The pass hit Renault on the tape of her stick and she sent the first shot of the game into the back of the net.But at the halfway point of the first, New Hampshire scored on a scrum in front of the net. SU goalie Jenn Gilligan couldn’t see the puck because of the players in front of her, but heard the shot as it was taken. She thought it went by her and as she got up, the puck slid in.Off the opening faceoff of the second period, junior Melissa Piacentini muscled past two defenders and made a move on UNH goalie Vilma Vaattovaara. But the forward couldn’t lift the puck over the goalie’s leg.“A few times I shot right in the goalie’s pads and it could’ve been a game-winner,” Piacentini said. “It could’ve been another goal.”After many chances, Grossi finally put Syracuse on the board again in the second, this time with a goal. She stepped off the bench, picked up a lose puck and quickly fired a wrist shot for the score.But despite doubling New Hampshire’s shots through the first two periods and maintaining possession in the offensive zone, Syracuse only had a one-goal lead to show for it.“It was just frustrating that we didn’t put the puck in in the second and first periods when we were dominating,” Renault said. “Those are the chances and the times we really just got to bear down and put the puck in the net.”New Hampshire took over in the third. It created more rushes and got shots off from the point.After a Syracuse turnover in the offensive zone, UNH forward Jonna Curtis took a shot from beyond the left circle. The puck hit off Gilligan’s glove and went into the net.As some of her former teammates celebrated, Gilligan — a junior who played two years at UNH — skated out of the crease, shaking her head.“Got to love those ones,” Gilligan said sarcastically. “You think you have it and it’s just by you and in the net.”The team stayed out on shifts too long in the second period, Flanagan said, and that’s why they let up at the end of the game. He said the players were selfish and need to be smarter about coming off the ice.Said Grossi: “We just got to play a full 60-minute game.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Women’s soccer falls to No. 1 Stanford at home

first_imgRedshirt senior striker Alex Anthony gets by a Stanford defender. USC lost 3-1 on Sunday in its penultimate regular-season game. Photo by Alex Zhang | Daily TrojanThe fifth-ranked women’s soccer team hosted No. 1 Stanford on Sunday at McAlister Field, falling 3-1 after beating the Cardinal 3-0 in the same fixture last season.The match was set to be a thriller on USC’s Senior Night, with two undefeated Pac-12 teams battling late into the season. Stanford entered the game with a 9-0-0 conference record compared to the Trojans’ 8-0-1 mark.But Stanford quieted the crowd in the 15th minute, drawing first blood. Cardinal midfielder Jaye Boissiere landed a cross from the top corner of the 18-yard box onto the head of Kiki Pickett. Just outside the 18-yard box, Pickett redirected the ball toward the bottom-right corner of the Trojan goal — just out of the reach of redshirt freshman goalkeeper Kaylie Collins — to grant the Cardinal an early 1-0 lead.USC quickly responded just two minutes later. With her back to the net, redshirt junior midfielder Sydney Myers received a pass from sophomore defender Julia Bigham. Myers found the equalizer with a quick turn inside the penalty box and a low shot rifled through traffic to the near post. The goal marked Myers’ second of the season — her first came a month ago in a 4-0 win over Oregon State.In the 26th minute, going toe-to-toe with freshman forward Tara McKeown, Cardinal junior midfielder Michelle Xiao beat McKeown on the outside and delivered an arcing ball just underneath the Trojans’ crossbar to once again take the lead. The remainder of the first half was scoreless thanks to a fantastic flying save from Collins on a header from freshman forward Civanna Kuhlmann. With some words of wisdom from head coach Keidane McAlpine, USC was able to regroup and come out flying in the second half. McAlpine said the main focus of his team talk was being aggressive.“We wanted to apply more pressure to their backline, and that was probably the biggest change in the second half,” McAlpine said. “It created enough chances. We just didn’t take them.”The aggressive mentality and playstyle produced several scoring opportunities for the Women of Troy — none of which were converted into goals. But the Trojan backline played lockdown defense throughout the second half and were able to keep their team in the game. Collins faced 18 shots in the match — her highest tally this season — and saved seven. But after making comebacks a habit throughout this fall, the Women of Troy did not respond on Sunday, and Stanford netted its second unanswered goal.Despite the strong defensive performance, the Cardinal sealed the game in the 63rd minute with its third goal on the day, when Catarina Macario sent a bending free kick into the top-right corner beyond a sprawling Collins. Sunday marked the first game since Aug. 19, 2016 — last year’s season-opener against Santa Clara — that USC has conceded 3 goals in one game. The loss to the Cardinal was the Trojans’ first against a Pac-12 team in 2017, and their conference record fell to 8-1-1. The Women of Troy will now prepare for their final game of the regular season on Friday, when they face off against crosstown rival No. 2 UCLA. “We have to play a full 90-minute game,” redshirt junior Sydney Myers said. “We have to match the aggression and give our 100-percent effort the whole game. I think we are going to be just as good as we were last year.”The Trojans fell 1-0 to the Bruins at the StubHub Center last season, and they look to avoid a repeat this Friday in Westwood against a dominant UCLA team.last_img read more

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