Security officers charged with $3.2M theft

first_imgThree security officers attached to Massy Security Limited on Wednesday appeared before Magistrate Judy Latchman at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts to answer to a larceny charge after they were accused of stealing $3.2 million.Clarence Patterson, Shawn Goodluck and Cosmo Chichester were jointly charged and entered a not-guilty plea.The robbery occurred on November 13, 2017, at Charlotte and Oronoque Streets, Georgetown.Police Prosecutor Simone Payne told the Court that on the day in question, the security officers collected the money bags containing the cash from Marics and Company Limited to be deposited at Republic Bank.However, the Company later discovered that the monies were not deposited and reported the matter to the Police.The trio was released on $200,000 bail each and the matter was adjourned to April 25, 2018.last_img read more

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AARON IS PURE GOLD IN TULLAMORE

first_imgAaron Mc Glynn from Glenfin was the outstanding athlete from the national underage and novice cross country champs Sunday in Tullamore.Totally in control in a good chasing position from the off he moved ahead in the U – 11 boys when it mattered and came home alone leading a Donegal team to team gold with Pat Loughrey from Buncrana 3rd supported by Luke Gavigan 19th, Jamie Keegan 37,and the Letterkenny pair of Ronan Frain and Ben Carr.The team score Donegal 165,Cork 199,Westmeath 208 with Mullingar winning the club contest from Valley. Mullingar 86, Finn Valley 112 , and Westport 115 Adam Mc Crudden ,Adam Mc Granaghan and Samuel Mc Clintock in support .THe lead runner in the 11 girls was Nikita Mc Devitt with team 7th while Leanne Kelly 11 th was best of the 13 girls a team that finished 4th . The under 13 boys fought hard indeed they have trained well just 2 pts adrift of medals indeed only 6 pts off silver.A consolation was that Pauric Patton 11th,Adam Lynch and Denver Kelly were on Donegal team that finished 2nd led by Malin boy James Mc Kinney 7th.The under 15 boys had Oisin Gallen on scoring bronze team while James Speight continues to excell closing in 4th under 19 boys.Mark Bonner was a member of Ulster medal winning team but didnt engage sufficiently early on to impact accordingly. In the novice it looked good for Noel Collins in the opening laps but he faded to 10th with Pauric Mc Laughlin a steady run to finish 17th . Not a great day for the novices but well done to all involved important to complete teams at this level .This Thursday night trials for Donegal relay teams cross country 600m @ Finn Valley 7pm under 12/14 based on last years age divisions.In another development Ballyliffin Coastal Challenge 10 mile April 23rd will be launched this Friday evening in Ballyliffin while the Donegal Co. Board have their annual awards night this Friday night also at Finn Valley with as many as possible encouraged to attend.AARON IS PURE GOLD IN TULLAMORE was last modified: January 17th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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GOLF NEWS: DUNFANAGHY CLUB THANK ALL WHO TOOK PART IN 5K FUNDRAISER

first_imgLady Captain Mary Lafferty, Captain Denis Martin, and Lady President Margaret Witherow after the sponsored walk.Well done to Lady Captain Mary Lafferty and Lady President Margaret Witherow and their team for organising the inaugural 5k sponsored walk/run in aid of the club refurbishment and Our Lady’s Hospital for Sick Children.The event was a terrific success and was enjoyed by all those who took part. Thanks to all who helped and those who took part.A Certificate of Achievement was presented to young Mia McClintock in recognition of her sponsorship collection and for completing the 5k. Well done Mia. Details of the presentation to Our Lady’s Hospital will be published when all sponsorship cards have been returned. If you have one please return it to the office. Mia McClintock receiving her Appreciation Certificate from Lady Captain Mary LaffertyDespite the usual mix of sunshine and rain, golfers turned out in their droves during the past week. Congratulations to Joe Toner who was the winner of the big event of the week, The Centenary Cup with a great score of 63 net. Eamon McGrath was second with 65 BOT, beating Paul Burton into third place. Keith Lapsley won the gross prize with a score of 73. In the Saturday Open Singles Stableford Competition Paul Burton was the winner with 36 points with William Hamilton in second place. Shane Greer won the gross while Brian McGinley was third.In the Wednesday open competition Frank Crumlish had a terrific score of 41 points beating Jim Carey into second place on 37 points We are now entering President’s week with a number of different events taking place culminating in the President’s Prize on Saturday the 16th . Best wishes to President Keith for the days ahead.Competition Results Wednesday Open – 06-Jul- 161st: Frank Crumlish 41 pts2nd: Jim Carey 39 ptsOpen Single Stableford – 09-Jul- 161st: Paul Burton 36 pts2nd: William Hamilton 36 pts BOT Gross: Shane Greer 27 gross pts3rd: Brian McGinley 34 ptsCategory: Cairns Witherow 33 ptsCentenary Cup 2016 – 10-Jul- 16 1st: Joseph Toner 632nd: Eamonn McGrath 65 BOTGross: Keith Lapsley 733rd: Paul Burton 65Category: Paddy Hegarty 671st 9: Michael Kelly 312nd 9: Aidan Fox 32Events for the Week AheadWednesday 13 th July – Gents Open Single SFThursday 14 th July – President’s Mixed FoursomesFriday 15th July – President’s Scramble at 4.30pmSaturday 16th July – Presidents Day SundaySunday 17th July – Gents Club Single S/FFunction Room for Private PartiesWe have hosted a number of private functions in the clubhouse recently and these have proved to be a great success. If you, or someone you know, is organising a private function please be aware that the clubhouse is available free of charge, with exclusive use for the occasion.So far, the feedback that we have been getting is that the golf club is the ideal venue for parties of up to one hundred people.Please make contact with Sarah if you are interested in holding a function at the clubhouse (074 91 36335)GOLF NEWS: DUNFANAGHY CLUB THANK ALL WHO TOOK PART IN 5K FUNDRAISER was last modified: July 13th, 2016 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DUNFANAGHY GOLF CLUB NOTESlast_img read more

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Former mayor explores the past of Santa Clarita

first_img If nothing else, the book is a good history lesson in which local readers have a strong stake. Before the city incorporated on Dec. 15, 1987, there were efforts to become a separate county. Boyer explores those campaigns and explains the evolution of what is now a bustling city of more than 170,000 people. “I think people ought to know what’s involved,” Boyer said, referring to portions of the book that talk about volunteer efforts to organize and expectations from the community for unpaid efforts to continue. “The idea of serving in public office just for the honor of it doesn’t work,” he said. “People should be decently paid so anyone can afford to run. It’s a huge sacrifice for some of the people who served in terms of lost income and opportunities.” Boyer also touches on his work with Healing the Children and establishing a sister city program that evolved into the Santa Clarita Valley International Program, on which he currently works raising money for medical missions. Santa Clarita has two sister cities: Tena, Ecuador, and Sariaya, Philippines. “To me, the sister city program works to give people of Santa Clarita a world view,” Boyer said. “It makes them realize we’re just a small part of the picture and get involved in an economic sphere much larger than we’re used to as well as offer humanitarian aid.” Boyer is taking the personal approach to sell his book, carrying a supply of copies in his car wherever he goes. “Bookstores want a dust cover and a UPC on my books, and I hate the darn things aesthetically. All that would do is drive up the cost if I had to do 1,000 dust covers. I thought I’d keep the price down.” He’s also offering the books to nonprofit organizations to sell, promising a percentage of the profits to be returned to the group. “Unless they don’t want to keep the percentage, then I’ll donate it to the sister city medical mission program,” he said. “Without having a plane fly overhead to say ‘Boyer’s book is out,’ I have to wait until more copies are sold to have money to advertise,” he said. “The City Council did ask me to bring books to the first council meeting in January.” Asked if he will be celebrating the city’s coming of age on Tuesday, Boyer answered in the affirmative. “Of course, if anyone wants to follow me out to the trunk of my car, I could always sell them a book,” he said, laughing. The cost of each book is $30.00. Boyer can be reached at (661) 259-3154. Carol Rock, (661) 257-5252 carol.rock@dailynews.com NEWHALL – Former Santa Clarita Mayor Carl Boyer has come up with a must-read for the holiday season. It could have been titled “Everything You Wanted To Know About Santa Clarita But Were Afraid To Ask,” but that title was too short. Instead “Santa Clarita: The Formation and Organization of the Largest Newly Incorporated City in the History of Humankind” is the latest entry on the local literary scene. Boyer credits Richard Dixon, chief administrative officer of Los Angeles County, with coining the phrase after the 41-square-mile city was approved in 1987 by the Local Agency Formation Commission, then by local voters. “Santa Clarita …” is Boyer’s first non-genealogy book. He has self-published more than two dozen genealogy volumes over the last several years. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals The book is a 353-page primer full of statistics and financials, laying out the cityhood backers’ case of taxation without representation, as well as making clear the costs – both physical and fiscal – of running for office. “I wrote the book because there is very little literature on city incorporation,” Boyer said. “There’s a book called ‘Southern California Metropolis’ that kind of explains the reasoning behind city incorporation. But I really wanted to give credit to the people involved and set the record straight on what happened.” The book covers the efforts of residents determined to bring local control to the Santa Clarita Valley, many of them frustrated by decisions made in downtown Los Angeles by the county Board of Supervisors that didn’t consider the needs of this area. And it also includes some tidbits on the region’s past – such as when civil rights legend Martin Luther King Jr. was gunned down and the board of the William S. Hart Union High School District refused to join the mourning nation in ordering campus flags flown at half-staff. The text is full of names familiar to those who have watched the area grow; the cast of movers and shakers over 40 years may sound familiar as well as remind readers how many leaders have been lost as the city has grown. Connie Worden-Roberts remains active, as do former Mayors Jan Heidt and Jo Anne Darcy and accountant Wayne Crawford. Among those who have died are Louis Braithwaite of the city’s first Planning Commission; Gil Callowhill, a water agency board member who helped drive cityhood; and Bob Lathrop, an activist who rallied the vote. center_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Education & Political News

first_imgWhat’s been happening in school boards about evolution and intelligent design?  Here are some recent stories about politicians, reporters and ordinary citizens:Kansas Grass Roots:  Candidates vying for school board seats in Liberal, Kansas squared off over the evolution issue: see Hutchinson News.Ohio Rematch:  Despite an earlier loss, Darwin critics in Ohio are hoping to bring up the issue for a vote again, reports CNS News.  The article editorializes that “Their goal is to force curriculum changes that would also allow discussion of the intelligent design theory,” when the wording of the proposed changes specifically denies this.McCain’s Open Mind:  Though an evolutionist himself, Senator John McCain thinks students ought to hear both sides in the debate over evolution, according to a piece in Evolution News that comments on a story reported in the New York Sun July 18.  The Sun said, “the senator mocked the idea that American young people were so delicate and impressionable that they needed to be sheltered from the concept” and compared it to cold-war efforts to shield students from learning about Marxism.White House Press:  President Bush’s press secretary Tony Snow entertained Wesley J. Smith of the Discovery Institute.  Smith was there to congratulate the president for vetoing the stem cell funding bill this week.Quilt Warfare:  In a bizarre piece of propaganda, Canadian quilt-making mom Barbara West ridiculed intelligent design on her (hopefully) intelligently-designed quilt.  According to Canmore Leader, West, whose quilt showed the earth on a pile of turtles (see humor page), won the National Award of Excellence for her design.  Casey Luskin of Discovery Institute had some smirks about this.Free Press:  Patrick Gavin, associate editorial page editor of the LA Examiner, gave lengthy coverage to Casey Luskin and John West about their post-Dover book Traipsing Into Evolution that critically analyzes Judge Jones’ ruling.WWJD:  Lita Cosner wrote for Creation Ministries International about how governments and secularists are fighting to make US schools Christ-free zones and are erring on the side of censorship.Conservative Backlash:  Not all pro-evolutionists are liberals.  A new group calls itself Conservatives Against Intelligent Design.  See also report on Science and Theology News.National Wahoo:  In the vein that everyone is someone elses’ weirdo, George Gilder of the Discovery Institute wrote a lengthy article supporting intelligent design for National Review, only to be trashed a week later by John Derbyshire on National Review.Evolutionary Faith:  Uncommon Descent found out that the National Center for Science Education is looking for a “Faith Project Director,”  This is odd, because the NCSE argues that evolution is built on science, and creation is based on faith.  The job duties include “developing materials pertaining to evolution and religion for print and web; representing NCSE to the faith community, in print and in person; serving as liaison between NCSE and professional theological societies and religious organizations; speaking to the press about issues involving evolution education and challenges to it; counseling teachers, administrators, parents, and others facing challenges to evolution education.” Thanks to Evolution News and Access Research Network for most of these leads.  Let’s get the ACLU to turn on the NCSE over separation of church and state.  Derbyshire is an arrogant hack who likens creationists to whack-a-moles.  This is a psychological disorder known as role reversal.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Davis to serve as interim director of OSU Extension

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Greg Davis has been selected to serve as interim director of Ohio State University Extension.Now Extension’s assistant director overseeing community development, Davis will begin his role July 1, 2015, as Director Keith Smith begins his first day of retirement following 23 years as leader. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.Davis serves on the steering committee for Conversations on the Future of Extension, an effort that began in spring 2014 with discussions to identify the most challenging trends and issues Ohioans will face by 2035. It is now in the “So what?” phase, he said, determining how Extension should address those issues.As interim director, Davis will look at how Extension approaches its work given the anticipated changes.“It’s exciting to take the organization down the initial steps, to flesh out where we go next for Extension,” he said. “When the next director is chosen, some things will already be identified.”As assistant director, Davis leads field-based Extension specialists and educators who are working to improve civic, environmental and economic conditions throughout Ohio. He earned his Ph.D in extension education from Ohio State, his MPA from Bowling Green State University and his BA from the University of Findlay.Brian Raison, Extension director in Miami County, will serve as interim assistant director for community development on a part-time basis until Davis returns to the post. A search is currently underway for the director position.last_img read more

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What’s Wrong With Shipping Container Housing? Everything.

first_imgWhat’s wrong with shipping container buildings? Nothing, if they’re used for the right purpose.For a temporary facility, where an owner desires the shipping container aesthetic, they can be a good fit. (Look, I’ve even done a container project!) For sites where on-site construction is not feasible or desirable, fitting a container out in the factory can be a sensible option, even though you’ll still have to do things like pour foundations on site. It probably won’t save you any money over conventional construction (and very well might cost more), but it can solve some other problems.The place where containers really don’t make any sense is housing. I know you’ve seen all the proposals, often done with a humanitarian angle (building slum housing, housing for refugees, etc.) that promise a factory-built “solution” to the housing “problem,” but often positioned as a luxury product as well. This post on ArchDaily got me started on a Twitter rant about the unsuitability of containers for these projects, and the larger trend of online design publications not bothering to ask any questions and run these press releases as “news.” Not to mention the architects themselves presenting this idea as a feasible solution to a major problem. A short list of why this won’t work1. Housing is usually not a technology problemAll parts of the world have vernacular housing, and it usually works quite well for the local climate. There are certainly places with material shortages, or situations where factory built housing might be appropriate — especially when an area is recovering from a disaster. In this case prefab buildings would make sense. But doing them in containers does not.2. If you are going through the trouble of building in factory, why not build to a dimension that is appropriate for human habitation?With only 7 feet clear inside a built-out container, you are left with the building code minimum room width as your typical condition. It’s hardly an ideal width, and it is not difficult to ship wider modular units: modular home builders do it all the time.3. InsulationAll surfaces of the container need to be insulated, and this means either building a new set of walls on the inside or outside of the container. If walls are furred out on the interior, this is convenient for plumbing and electrical lines but it narrows the usable space of an already small box. It also allows for a huge amount of thermal bridging unless the floor is built up with insulation on the inside (which brings up a host of other problems). If the exterior is insulated it no longer looks like a container, and then you have to pay to clad the entire thing over the insulation. In either scenario you’re duplicating all of the walls that you started with. Improper insulation will result in heavy condensation on the inside of the metal exterior walls.4. StructureYou’ve seen the proposals with cantilevers everywhere. Containers stacked like Lego building blocks, or with one layer perpendicular to the next. Architects love stuff like this, just like they throw around usually misleading/meaningless phrases like “kit of parts.” Guess what — the second you don’t stack the containers on their corners, the structure that is built into the containers needs to be duplicated with heavy steel reinforcing. The rails at the top and the roof of the container are not structural at all (the roof of a container is light gauge steel, and will dent easily if you step on it). If you cut openings in the container walls, the entire structure starts to deflect and needs to be reinforced because the corrugated sides act like the flange of beam and once big pieces are removed, the beam stops working. All of this steel reinforcing is very expensive, and it’s the only way you can build a “double-wide.”5. StackingOne recent competition boasted that because containers can be stacked nine high, concrete floors could be provided every 9th floor with stacks of containers in between. That load still needs to travel down through the building, and still then requires columns. Those floors every ninth floor need to hold the entire weight of nine stories of building above, which makes it dubious that you’d really be saving much on structure. The foundation also needs to be built similarly to a “regular” site-built building, and this is one of the most expensive pieces. Stacking also requires a large crane and an area for staging the prefabricated container modules, which can be hard to arrange on a dense urban infill site.6. Utilities and mechanical systemsIn a large building, you’ll still need a lot of space to run utilities. Because of the problems with insulation mentioned above, you will need to install a very robust HVAC system to heat and cool the building (that Mumbai tower would literally be a deathtrap without cooling). You will have a hard time taking advantage of passive strategies like thermal mass if you maintain the container aesthetic. You’ll also end up with low ceilings, as even high cube containers are only 9-foot-6 in overall exterior height, so any ductwork or utilities start cutting in to headroom.7. RecyclingPart of the container narrative is that it’s “green” because we have a surplus of containers that can be reused. This is somewhat true, but in reality many existing container projects use brand new containers from China (which are still very cheap to buy). Used containers need to be thoroughly cleaned because there is a risk they may have been used to transport something toxic in the past.What you get with a container is cheap structure, if you can use the box basically as is. As soon as you remove anything (including the ends) you need to hire welders and buy steel. Architecture is more than structure, though, and structure on its own is not particularly expensive, especially when you are building a space as small as a shipping container, so the savings here are minimal. Relatively untrained people can build a room that size of simple wood framing in a day without needing to rent a crane or learning how to weld for about the same cost (or less) than buying a used container. Competition winner GA Designs had proposed the shipping container skyscraper as a solution to slum housing conditions in India. There are a number of glaring problems with this idea (some of which Llyod Alter takes on in a post on Treehugger). RELATED ARTICLES center_img Shipping Containers Turned Into ApartmentsMaison Idekit: The Container Home Evolves Q&A: Is Warren Thatcher’s “Build a container home” guide worthwhile? Q&A: Can I build a Passivhaus using recycled shipping containers? Q&A: What kind of insulation would you recommend for a 20′ shipping container being renovated into a home/studio space?Q&A: Low carbon and low cost? Planterwald Mark Hogan is an architect and the principal of OpenScope Studio in San Francisco. This post originally appeared at his website Markasaurus.last_img read more

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Ram temple will be built at right time: V.K. Singh

first_imgUnion minister V.K. Singh today said that Ram temple will be built at the right time and as promised in the NDA manifesto. The Union minister for external affairs was here to attend a convocation ceremony of a private university. Speaking about Mumbai terror attack mastermind and banned Jamaat-ud-Dawah (JuD) chief Hafiz Saeed’s entry into Pakistan’s politics, Nr, Singh said that it depended on Pakistan if it wanted to become a terrorist nation. We should not be concerned about it and the decision should be left to Pakistan, he said. Mr. Singh, in the event, also said he accidentally entered politics and had never planned it.“I wanted to serve the society after retiring from the army and joined a Anna Hazare’s movement. But, I distanced myself from the movement when it started taking a political shape. Then I accidentally came into politics,” he said.last_img read more

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Measleslike Virus Likely Culprit in U.S. Dolphin Die-Off

first_imgA measleslike virus appears to be the chief cause of the droves of dead dolphins that have washed ashore along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States this summer, researchers announced yesterday. Since 1 July, 333 bottlenose dolphins have been recovered from beaches between New York and North Carolina—10 times the number usually recovered at this time of year.In early August, the large number of strandings prompted the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to declare an Unusual Mortality Event. The declaration freed up federal funding to assist NOAA’s Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program to retrieve and assess the mammals’ remains. The results of their investigation point to a type of morbillivirus as the cause of the die-off—a group that includes viruses that cause measles in humans and distemper in dogs. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The team’s detective work combined traditional techniques that examined tissues from dead animals’ lungs, brains, and lymph systems with molecular techniques to probe for the presence of the virus. So far, researchers have examined 33 dolphins; 32 have tested positive for morbillivirus. Genetic sequencing has confirmed that 11 carry the type of morbillivirus that infects only dolphins, porpoises, and whales.“Along the Atlantic seaboard this [outbreak] is extraordinary; this is the largest outbreak that we have had since the 1987 die-off,” said Teri Rowles, head of NOAA’s Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program, in a teleconference with reporters. Morbillivirus was also responsible for a devastating 1987 die-off which killed more than 700 dolphins.Many wild dolphins exposed during that epidemic probably developed immunity to the virus, Rowles says. But a population’s immunity is slowly eroded over time; animals born since 1987 are probably susceptible, Rowles says.The virus may have taken hold when the dolphin population reached a tipping point, with enough susceptible individuals to sustain its spread, says veterinary epidemiologist Stephanie Venn-Watson of the National Marine Mammal Foundation in San Diego, California. The epidemic will continue until the number of susceptible animals dwindles, researchers predict. There is no feasible way to vaccinate or treat the animals, they add.It is difficult to predict how many bottlenose dolphins will ultimately succumb to the disease, and the documented strandings probably represent just a fraction of the infected animals. It is also not clear whether the virus will spread to other dolphin species. Typically, morbillivirus strains don’t spread beyond closely related species, researchers say.As for any threat to people, “there is no indication that this virus could jump into humans,” says virologist Jerry Saliki of the University of Georgia in Athens. However, morbilliviruses suppress the immune system, so many of the washed-up animals are sick with secondary bacterial infections that are communicable to other mammals. Under some circumstances, rotting carcasses could pose a threat to beachgoers and other mammals. NOAA plans to continue to monitor the spread of the infection and investigate whether marine pollution could be worsening the impact of the outbreak. Rowles explains that high levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, known to suppress mammals’ immune systems, have been reported in some areas along the eastern coastline. “We will be monitoring those areas very closely,” she adds.last_img read more

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Years after shutting down, U.S. atom smasher reveals properties of ‘God particle’

first_imgIn a scientific ghost story, a U.S. atom smasher has made an important scientific contribution 3.5 years after it shut down. Scientists are reporting that the Tevatron collider in Batavia, Illinois, has provided new details about the nature of the famed Higgs boson—the particle that’s key to physicists’ explanation of how other fundamental particles get their mass and the piece in a theory called the standard model. The new result bolsters the case that the Higgs, which was discovered at a different atom smasher, exactly fits the standard model predictions.“This is a very interesting and important paper, because it’s a different mechanism” for probing the Higgs’s properties, says John Ellis, a theorist at King’s College London and CERN who was not involved in the work. “This is the swan song” for the Tevatron, he says.The Tevatron, a 7-kilometer-long ring-shaped collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, ran from 1983 until September 2011. It saw hints of the Higgs boson but never actually discovered the particle. That honor went to physicists working at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 27-kilometer-long atom smasher at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. 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But the particle has other characteristic properties, too. Like all fundamental particles, the Higgs has a fixed and quantized amount of angular momentum or spin. It also has a property of symmetry called parity, which can be either even or odd and which affects, for example, the way the Higgs can decay into other particles. According to the standard model, the Higgs should have zero spin and positive parity. However, it’s conceivable that the observed particle could have zero spin and negative parity or two units of spin and positive parity. Many physicists would be thrilled if the Higgs had such exotic “spin-parity,” as it would point to new phenomena not predicted by the standard model.In fact, experimenters working with the two biggest particle detectors fed by the LHC—massive devices called ATLAS and CMS—have already shown with high certainty that the Higgs boson has zero spin and even parity. To do that, they studied the decay of the Higgs into familiar particles, such as a pair of photons or a pair of massive particles called Z bosons. From the angular distributions of those emerging daughter particles, physicists were able to determine the spin and parity of the parent Higgs.Researchers working with the Tevatron data took a different tack. Instead of studying the decays of the Higgses, they looked for signs of a Higgs produced in tandem with a Z boson or a W boson, particles that convey the weak nuclear force, as they explain in a paper in press at Physical Review Letters. (The Higgs was assumed to decay into a pair of particles known as a bottom quark and an antibottom quark.) From the energies and momenta of the Higgs and its partner, researchers then calculated a quantity called the invariant mass for the pair. Were the Higgs and the partner born from the decay of a single parent particle, this quantity would be the mass of that parent. In actuality, the Higgs and its partner would emerge directly from the chaos of the particle collision, so the parent particle is purely hypothetical.Nevertheless, by calculating the mass of that hypothetical parent particle, researchers were able to test for different combinations of spin and parity by proxy. If the Higgs had “exotic” spin-parity rather than the standard model characteristics, the observed invariant mass would be higher. So researchers working with the two particle detectors fed by the Tevatron—CDF and D0—searched for such high-invariant mass pairs. Finding none, they ruled out even more stringently exotic versions of the Higgs. So even though Tevatron physicists never conclusively observed the Higgs boson, they were able to put limits on its properties.Technically, the new Tevatron limits are slightly stronger than the limits set by the LHC experiments, says Dmitri Denisov, a physicist at Fermilab who works on D0. But CERN’s Ellis says that ATLAS and CMS had already essentially settled the matter.In fact, Tevatron researchers missed an opportunity to scoop their LHC counterparts on the spin and parity of the Higgs, Ellis says. Just weeks after researchers at the LHC had discovered the Higgs, Ellis and colleagues explained in a paper how the Tevatron teams might apply the invariant-mass technique to their archived data to take the “fast track” to testing the Higgs’s spin and parity. For technical reasons, the technique would be more sensitive on Tevatron data than on LHC data, they explained, because the Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons, whereas the LHC collided protons and protons. But in the end, the Tevatron analysis proceeded slowly, as CDF and D0 team members left to work on the LHC. “This result has somewhat of an ‘us too’ character rather than being first as we’d hoped,” Ellis says.Denisov agrees that lack of people impeded progress. He notes that the whole idea could have been tried even before the Higgs was found: “If [Ellis] had come to us a year before we might have been able to determine the spin and parity of the Higgs even before it was discovered.”For Higgs studies at the Tevatron, “this is basically it,” Denisov says. In the meantime, physicists working at the LHC are aiming to probe other properties of the Higgs with higher precision. In particular, they hope to measure to within a few percentage points how quickly the Higgs decays into different combinations of more-familiar particles and compare that with standard model predictions. Researchers say that work should take about 15 years.last_img read more

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