Freekbass Announces Upcoming 2019 Studio Album

first_imgBassist extraordinaire Freekbass has announced that he will release a new studio album in 2019, via Eddie Roberts‘ new Color Red record label. Color Red will release a new single “Fre3KroNomoKon” on January 15th, with a full-length album expected in May 2019.Freekbass is a decorated performer as a soloist and as a member of the funktronica trio, Headtronics, also featuring DJ Logic and Particle keyboardist Steve Molitz. The famed bassist has six full-length albums under his belt, as well as collaborations with Bootsy Collins, Adam Deitch, Mike Gordon, Skerik, Jennifer Hartswick, and others.Recently, Freekbass and Turkuaz’s resident lady-in-pink, Sammi Garett, have been collaborating and playing live shows together, with Garett set to be a part of Color Red’s upcoming release. In May, the pair released a collaborative funky new single titled “Love In Your Pocket”, paired with a psychedelic and theatric new music video. Freekbass and Garett’s “Love In Your Pocket”, was produced and co-written by Grammy-winner and Groove Collection co-founder Itaal Shur, with its wild music video directed by Angie Wilson. “Love In Your Pocket” taps into Turkuaz’s fun-loving, extravagant feel, highlighting Garett’s influence on her co-collaborator. However, Freekbass makes his presence felt on the new track as well, giving the song a more eclectic edge, with his robotic, gritty vocals.Freekbass ft. Sammi Garett – “Love In Your Pocket”[Video: TheFreekbassChannel]In August, Freakbass released another new single-video titled “Steppin’ Outta Line”, with special guest Sammi Garett on vocals. Produced by Grammy Award winner Itaal Shur and co-written by Lonnie Marshall (Snoop Dogg, Macy Gray), the funky and cosmic dance groove is paired with a comical video, featuring an ’80s-style dance party. Freakbass’s drippy and splashy bass bombs are accompanied perfectly with Garett’s powerful vocals, with additional backup singers assisting on the funkadelic new tune.Freakbass ft. Sammi Garett-“Steppin’ Outta Line”[Video: TheFreekbassChannel]Head to Freekbass’ website for a full list of his upcoming tour dates and ticketing information.[H/T Jambase]last_img read more

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John Mayer Releases Pensive New Single, “I Guess I Just Feel Like” [Listen]

first_imgToday, John Mayer has released a new studio single, “I Guess I Just Feel Like”, his first official release since his 2018 hit, “New Light“. The heartfelt new tune was initially debuted live by Mayer during an intimate solo show in Los Angeles. As On Air with Ryan Seacrest noted after the song’s October debut, Mayer mused about the differences between the new song and his most recent single release, “New Light“, which was certified as a hit record. “I am hugely indecisive and I am constantly getting my inspiration replaced … so I put out ‘New Light’ and I’m like ‘I’m gonna do a whole record like ‘New Light’ … and then I [change my mind]. … I think I’m doing songs instead of records. … I think I like to put songs out like movies, but a little faster than movies.”“There’s nothing hit-like about it,” Mayer said jokingly about the new tune, “But sometimes you just need to tell the truth with just a guitar.”“I Guess I Just Feel Like” starts out as a John Prine-like lament as Mayer sings pensively over simple acoustic strumming. The tune grows in scope from there, ending with a typically excellent electric solo from the decorated guitarist. While this may not be like his other recent work—and may not be “hit-like,” as Mayer noted—it’s undoubtedly a beautifully-constructed piece of vulnerable, sincere music that any of Mayer’s various groups of fans can appreciate. Give it a listen below:John Mayer – “I Guess I Just Feel Like”last_img read more

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Listen To The Grateful Dead Captivate Madison Square Garden On This Day In 1981

first_imgPlaying Madison Square Garden can be a daunting task for any musician, but it can also bring out the best in them and elevate the performance. On this date, 37 years ago, the Grateful Dead played their first of a pair of nights at the Mecca, rising to the occasion to deliver an all-time memorable NYC performance.Setting the tone right away with “Feel Like A Stranger” and a glowing transition from “Althea” into the blues themes of “C.C. Rider,” the Dead were locked in early, opening up the flood gates for sweet jam concoctions all night. A funky “Deep Elem Blues” mid-set would not be outdone by a jazzy “Bird Song” and “New Minglewood Blues” set closer.Coming out with a classic “China Cat Sunflower” > “I Know You Rider” combo to open the second set, it was all smooth sailing into swirling, sonic bliss from there. The centerpiece of the set arrived with a monster sequence of “Estimated Prophet”> “Uncle John’s Band” > “Drums” > “The Other One” > “Stella Blue” > “Good Lovin,’” with the band finally closing with “U.S. Blues.”Listen to the Grateful Dead’s entire March 9, 1981 performance from MSG below:Setlist: Grateful Dead at Madison Square Garden, New York, NY – 3/9/81:Set I: Feel Like A Stranger, Althea > CC Rider, Ramble On Rose > El Paso, Deep Elem Blues, Beat It On Down The Line, Bird Song, Minglewood BluesSet II: China Cat Sunflower > I Know You Rider > Samson & Delilah, Ship of Fools, Estimated Prophet > Uncle John’s Band > Drums > The Other One > Stella Blue > Good Lovin’Encore: U.S. Blueslast_img read more

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Pumping up sports spirits

first_imgIt would have been hard to miss Cheng Ho ’10 at Harvard’s athletic events. He’s usually the one mixed in with the crowds, displaying a boatload of Crimson spirit.A Harvard running back in the fall, a super fan in the winter, Ho has been revered by fans and coaches alike for his crowd-igniting antics as a fan as well as for his contributions as a member of the football team.As a fan, Ho was an integral part of a marketing campaign that boosted attendance at men’s basketball games this season. This culminated in an unprecedented sellout, bringing 2,195 to Lavietes Pavilion in a showdown match against Cornell. A month and a half later, Ho helped to draw a record 13,285 spectators to Harvard Stadium to watch the men’s lacrosse team take on Duke, just 437 fans shy of the NCAA regular-season record. Where the upbeat Ho went, the fans followed.And yet for Ho, Crimson football — and Harvard for that matter — almost never happened.Born and raised in Taiwan until age 13, Ho was thrust into maturity at a young age. His father lost an eight-year battle with liver cancer, and because his mother had her own struggle with schizophrenia, she was unable to care for Ho and his sister alone.Eventually, the siblings found themselves in the adoptive care of their aunt and uncle in Georgia, and that was the move that changed Ho’s life.“I’m very fortunate because I shouldn’t be alive right now, to be honest,” Ho said. “My sister and I probably would have been wandering the streets of Taipei if it wasn’t for my aunt and uncle.”Despite strong family support, initially the adjustment to a new culture was a challenge for Ho because of his limited knowledge of English.“English was very frustrating, because I consider myself pretty social. … The initial two months were the most frustrating,” he said. “I remember holding this electronic translator and trying to read just a paragraph of a science textbook, and it took me like two hours. … I would have to look up every single word.”Searching for something, anything, he could find to ease him through his transition, Ho found sports to be the perfect therapy.“Sports really opened up a new world for me, as far as being able to gain confidence and being able to socialize with people,” he said.Although Ho’s first love was basketball, living in the South meant being indoctrinated in football, something he didn’t comprehend when living in Taiwan. “The first time I watched a game of football was back in Taiwan. And I was just thinking: ‘Man, these people are crazy. This is such a stupid sport. I would never be able to, and want to, play this sport, ever.’ So I flipped the channel, and that was that,” Ho said.That changed, of course, because it wasn’t long before Ho’s athleticism on the basketball court prompted friends and coaches to persuade him to give the gridiron a shot.“Initially, it was really confusing because I didn’t know any of the rules, the shape of the football was really weird, and I couldn’t hold on to it,” he said. “I couldn’t really understand English, so I would run in the opposite direction. … It was complete chaos.”Eventually the chaos subsided, and over time, he began to excel on the field. Ho sent highlight tapes to several Division I football programs across the country, and teams began to show interest, including Harvard.After spending a postgraduate year in Connecticut to improve his English and prepare for the rigors of college, Ho was admitted to Harvard, and was ready to take Cambridge by storm in more ways than one.During his freshman year in 2006, he was behind future NFL running back Clifton Dawson ’07 on the depth chart, and then had a breakout season as a sophomore. In his first collegiate start at Holy Cross, he racked up 24 carries for 116 yards, including a 47-yard touchdown run. That season, Ho finished second in the Ivy League in rushing with 722 yards and eight touchdowns. His play helped the Crimson to an undefeated (7-0) Ivy League championship run and earned him a spot on the All Ivy second team.It was his best, and only full season at Harvard, as he spent the next two years hampered by injuries, and only played in eight games as an upperclassman. Although injuries shortened his career, Ho remained an integral part of the team, as well as a leader and an inspiration to the Harvard community.“He obviously took the long road to Harvard figuratively and literally. And because of that … he really has, as much as any kid we’ve had here, embraced everything that is Harvard, and has taken advantage of the education on the field, the education in the classroom, the education on campus,” said head football coach Tim Murphy.“He’ll be remembered for his love of life, his leadership by example, and his extreme pride in being a part of the Harvard community as a whole, not just a Harvard football player.”last_img read more

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Justin Stern awarded Frederick Sheldon Traveling Fellowship

first_imgThe Harvard Committee on General Scholarships has awarded Justin Stern the Frederick Sheldon Traveling Fellowship. The competitive fellowship, which affords scholars the opportunity to conduct research or study outside of Cambridge, is awarded to only one Harvard graduate. Stern was selected by the fellowship committee from a pool of applicants from Harvard’s various graduate Schools.A recent graduate of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD), Stern is a research associate in the department of urban planning and design and an instructor in urban planning in the GSD Career Discovery Program. Having also received a Fulbright Scholarship for the 2012-13 year, he will use the Sheldon fellowship to fund research and language study in Hong Kong and Seoul, after which he will continue his studies in a doctoral program. Stern’s research will focus on the political economy of urban morphology in late industrializing countries in Asia, exploring how export-oriented industrialization and the scale of industry in East Asian countries factor into urban design, planning, and other elements of spatial morphology.last_img read more

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The start that comes with aid

first_imgThe room was filled with powerful political operatives. These were the people who managed the campaigns of the 2012 presidential election, and they were shoulder-to-shoulder with Jasmine Burnett ’16.“Never in my life did I ever think I would be in the same room with these people. But there I was, and there was [former White House presidential adviser] David Axelrod,” said Burnett, who is on the special events committee at Harvard’s Institute of Politics. “You hear a lot about the resources that Harvard has, and the incredible opportunities that are here. Until you come here and until you experience it all, I don’t think you really realize … the opportunities that are here waiting for you.”While Burnett has always nurtured an interest in politics, she never dreamed she would come to Harvard College. A native of Atlanta, she didn’t initially consider applying to the school.“My mom told me from a very young age that I was going to have to work hard, not only to get into to college, but work hard to be able to pay for college,” Burnett said. “I was applying to a lot of schools, and I just thought that Harvard was so far out of my reach on both levels.”It was Burnett’s mother who strongly urged her daughter to apply to Harvard.“My mom said that Harvard has a great financial aid program and that I should apply. But I never thought I would get in,” she said.To keep the College affordable for students like Burnett and others from nearly every financial background, the school has made a strong commitment to its financial aid initiative. For the current academic year the College’s financial aid budget was increased by $10 million, or 5.8 percent, bringing the total to a record $182 million. Since 2007, Harvard’s investment in financial aid for undergraduates has increased 88 percent.Approximately 60 percent of College students receive need-based scholarship aid, and approximately 20 percent of families pay nothing. Many College students actually graduate debt-free.Funding for this important program is one of six top priorities in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ (FAS) $2.5 billion Campaign for Arts and Sciences, which launched over the weekend. In total, the FAS is hoping to raise $600 million to fund financial aid. Currently, only about half of financial aid funds come from the endowment, requiring administrators to fund assistance out of the operating budget and through current-use donations provided by generous alumni. FAS Dean Michael D. Smith said he hopes to increase the percentage of endowment funding to about 80, which would put the program on a much more sustainable path.“Keeping Harvard affordable for every extraordinary student we accept is one of our fundamental commitments. That’s what our industry-leading financial aid program is all about,” said Smith. “Through the Campaign for Arts and Sciences, we want to ensure that our leadership in this area is sustainable for the long term, so that for generations to come we can continue to encourage incredibly talented students, regardless of means, to come take advantage of all that Harvard has to offer them.”For Burnett, even though she had been accepted, and financial aid would make Harvard an affordable option, it was when she set foot on campus that she knew Harvard was the place for her. “When I came to campus for Visitas,” the weekend program for admitted students, “I found people from very different backgrounds, yet we all had a lot in common,” she said. “And it doesn’t matter if I am a financial aid student, because most undergraduates here receive some form of aid. Whether you receive aid or not, we all eat in the same dining halls, and we all live in the same dorms.”For August Dao ’15, the path to Harvard started halfway around the world. Dao was born in Vietnam, but came to Portland, Ore., with his family when he was just 13 months old. Being a first-generation American with parents who do not speak English, Dao said the drive to attend college came from within.“My parents really weren’t in a position to help me out, so I really had to be proactive. When I was in middle school, I first really heard about Harvard and how it was the best school in the country, and it was my dream school for a long time,” Dao said. “My high school was one of the most poorly funded in the district, so not a lot of people in my school thought about going to a place like Harvard.”Financial aid would play a large role in Dao’s decision of where to apply to college. He said that from the beginning, it was clear Harvard’s financial aid program was the key to helping him realize his dream.“I was kind of amazed at how it worked and how easy it was to find information and apply for financial aid. It’s really very simple,” Dao said. Ultimately, he said, Harvard proved to be the most affordable of all the colleges that accepted him.Dao has flourished at Harvard. In addition to being a pre-med concentrating in chemistry, he is co-president of the Southeast Asian Coalition and a singer in KeyChange, Harvard’s R&B, hip-hop, and soul a capella group. Last summer, he studied in Italy. He also travels into Boston weekly on the T to work at Health Leads, a nonprofit social services program that connects families with much-needed resources.“What I would say to anyone applying to Harvard is that I was you at one point. You just really have to be open to the amazing possibilities Harvard presents,” Dao said.Austin Mueller ’17 has been at Harvard only two months, but already he’s heard a number of world leaders speak. It’s quite a change from life in Chilton, Wis., his hometown of less than 4,000 people located between Milwaukee and Green Bay.“The Harvard-Boston environment is much different than the one back home in Wisconsin,” he said.When he was looking at colleges, Mueller said he didn’t give much thought to applying to Harvard — that is, until he learned about the financial aid program.“I assumed that I wouldn’t be able to afford college, regardless of location or prestige. My parents wouldn’t be able to help me out with tuition, and I didn’t have much money of my own,” Mueller said. “I knew about Harvard’s financial aid program, and it is one of the main reasons that I applied. I knew that it was statistically unlikely for me to be admitted, but I took the chance because I knew it would be like winning the lottery academically and financially.”Mueller said he is finding incredible opportunities at every turn. And he feels he’s already making his mark at Harvard.“I think it’s important to have a broad cross-section of students at Harvard. There are talented and worthy students from all social and economic classes,” he said. “Socio-economic diversity complements racial, geographic, and all other types of diversity in creating a vibrant student body.”last_img read more

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Boston’s National Digital Stewardship residents announced

first_img Read Full Story The National Digital Stewardship Residency Boston (NDSR-Boston) program, which focuses on developing professionals in digital stewardship through post-graduate residencies, announced their first cohort of residents. Each resident will take on a project at their host institution beginning in September 2014.The residents all have interesting and unique backgrounds with one common thread – a strong commitment to digital preservation and conservation.The NDSR Boston staff and hosts are excited to begin working with the residents. Andrea Goethals, project director and the Harvard Library host mentor, welcomed them, saying, “I know that I speak for all the Boston area hosts when I say that we are very impressed with the amount of enthusiasm, creativity and intelligence these residents are bringing to the program. We’re confident that their work at the host institutions will contribute significantly to each institution’s digital preservation program.”last_img read more

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Hugh Calkins, former Overseer, Corporation member

first_imgFormer Harvard Board of Overseers and Corporation member Hugh Calkins ’45, J.D. ’49, died at his home in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, on Aug, 4.Calkins served on Harvard’s Board of Overseers from 1966 to 1968 and was a member of the Harvard Corporation from 1968 to 1985. Then-President Derek Bok awarded him an honorary doctor of laws degree in 1986 in recognition and appreciation of his two decades of service to the University.“Hugh was one of the three Corporation members who came to see me on a snowy night at the end of 1970 to offer me the presidency. He was certainly a model Corporation member,” Bok said.Henry Rosovsky, who succeeded Calkins on the Corporation, believes Calkins deserves credit for helping create a more open atmosphere for the Corporation across the University.“Hugh was on the Corporation during a very difficult time at Harvard: the 1960s. He was unique in that he extended himself to everyone and spent time with students, as a result of which he made the Corporation and other governing boards more visible. Considering Harvard’s traditions at the time, that was a tremendous service and one of his main achievements.”Born in Newton, Mass., Calkins’ undergraduate years at Harvard were interrupted by service in the Air Force during World War II. He later attended Harvard Law School and was president of the Harvard Law Review.Following graduation he clerked for Justice Learned Hand of the New York Circuit Court and Justice Felix Frankfurter of the U.S. Supreme Court before joining the Cleveland firm of Jones, Day, where he ultimately became senior partner and head of the firm’s tax division. Calkins was active in national legal circles throughout his career, most notably serving as deputy director of President Eisenhower’s Commission on National Goals.Calkins’ experience on the Goals Commission launched his longtime commitment to, and eventual second career in, education. He returned to Cleveland to found Plan for Action by Citizens for Education (PACE) and served on the Cleveland Board of Education from 1965 to 1969.Following his retirement from Jones, Day, Calkins earned a teaching certificate and devoted several years to teaching in inner-city schools in Cleveland. He also managed Initiatives in Urban Education (IUE), a foundation organized for Calkins by his children that is dedicated to improving student achievement outcomes in Cleveland public schools. In that role, Calkins was instrumental in helping found Citizens Academy, a charter school near University Circle that has since gained recognition as one of the state’s highest-achieving charter schools.A September memorial service will be held in Ohio. Remembrances of Hugh Calkins may be shared at http://hughcalkinsremembrances.wordpress.com/about/.last_img read more

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Pforzheimer Fellowships program renewed

first_imgFollowing a successful program launch this year, the Harvard Library will welcome its second cohort of Pforzheimer Fellows in the summer of 2015.The program, which seeks to foster intellectual and professional partnerships between professional librarians and graduate students in the humanities, is named in honor of Carl H. Pforzheimer III and his generous contributions to Harvard and its libraries.Interested graduate students in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences must state their interest in one of 16 proposed library projects from nine repositories and three departments of the Harvard Library. Projects touch on the intellectual issues of librarianship via work on collections and services. Read more about the program, proposed projects and applications here.The deadline for students to apply is March 1, 2015; the program runs from June 1 through July 31, 2015. The 2015 Fellows will be awarded a grant of $5,000 each and will be announced in the spring.last_img read more

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An icy welcome

first_imgCoach Charley Butt has led the Harvard crew team out on the water just a handful of times this season, ramping up the team’s indoor training instead.This is not a new training strategy, but more fallout from this year’s unprecedented snowfall and cold temperatures. The Charles River — the team’s practice area — has been choked with ice.“The last time there was ice this late in the year it was 1967,” said Butt, the Bolles-Parker Head Coach for Harvard Men’s Heavyweight Crew. That year, according to weather reports, it snowed as late as April 24.Harvard’s crew season officially begins April 4 here in Cambridge against Cornell, and for the past two weeks Butt and his assistant coaches have been breaking up the ice on their stretch of the Charles.“We won’t be able to race if it’s not melted,” said Butt.Assistant coach Patrick Lapage has been leading the anti-ice efforts, which are equal parts MacGyver and winging it. Lapage ’12, a onetime government concentrator, takes a boat out with a companion, and whoever isn’t driving stands at the rear of the boat, rocking side to side to break up the ice. Creating waves helps crack it as well, he noted, as does smashing it with an oar.“It’s really kind of primitive,” he said.When it came to other outdoor sports, “keeping all of the athletic facilities open for use during the harsh winter storms was a difficult task,” said Associate Director of Athletics Tim Troville. “The athletics grounds staff worked tirelessly through each storm to prevent the cancellation of recreational activities, practices, and intercollegiate competitions. This year was more difficult than most due to the amount of snow and frequency of storms.”Harvard University crew teams have been unable to practice outside thus far this season due to icy conditions on the Charles River. This freshman team uses an indoor tank. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerCrews also worked at all hours to maintain the integrity of “the bubble.”“The bubble is the inflated structure used during the winter months in Harvard Stadium, allowing many user groups to train during inclement weather. It must be monitored around the clock during snow events to avoid snow buildup and to maintain safe egress paths. The care that the staff took to maintain the safe operation of the bubble translated to very few cancellations of scheduled activities,” Troville said.Athletics crews also instituted what’s known as the black sand approach — mounting a snow blower to a tractor and cutting walking paths into the baseball and softball fields while they were buried in snow, according to Troville.“We then spread black sand over the surface of the snow. The black sand absorbs the sun’s rays and radiates heat through the snow. We saw great results. Both fields are nearly ready for play, and we’re looking forward to hosting our first games next week.”A notice inside the Weld Boathouse. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer Saturday’s home races for men’s lightweight crew, women’s heavyweight, and women’s lightweight crew have been canceled due to icy conditions on the Charles River. Men’s heavyweight crew will compete against Cornell on April 4 at Harvard.last_img read more

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