Boosting Butanol’s Role in the Biofuel World

first_img SHARE SHARE Previous articleTen Things Consumers Should Know About HarvestNext articleMorning Outlook Andy Eubank Boosting Butanol’s Role in the Biofuel World Facebook Twitter The potential for boosting butanol as a biofuel is more promising thanks to USDA scientists and their partners.  Work by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) suggests that barley straw and corn stover – which are both agricultural byproducts – could be cost effective feedstocks for producing biobutanol.  ARS is the USDA’s chief scientific research agency – and this work supports the USDA priority of developing new energy sources.Gallon for gallon – biobutanol has 30-percent more energy than ethanol – and only around four-percent less energy than a gallon of petroleum-based gasoline.Source: NAFB News Service By Andy Eubank – Nov 16, 2014 Facebook Twitter Home Energy Boosting Butanol’s Role in the Biofuel Worldlast_img read more

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Sales of Precision Farm Services Expected to Slow

first_img By Hoosier Ag Today – Aug 14, 2016 SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Previous articlePostcards from the Indiana State FairNext articleAgricultural Innovation Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Hoosier Ag Today Home Indiana Agriculture News Sales of Precision Farm Services Expected to Slow Following the downturn in the agriculture economy, a majority of precision farm equipment dealers expects sales to slow. Only 40 percent of dealers expect some growth in their precision farming sales due to the continuing headwinds in agriculture. Still, precision farm equipment dealers remain optimistic. A benchmark study found only 21.1 percent of dealers expect any fall off in revenue, a considerable improvement from last year’s results when 35.5 percent of dealers predicted declining revenues.The percentage of dealers reporting declines of 7 percent or less in 2015 revenue was about 2 percent less than forecast in last year’s benchmark study. When it comes to predicting strong growth, however, fewer dealers expect a significant gain in sales dollars in the precision segment of their business. The survey shows just 1 in 10 dealers are projecting revenue increases of over 8 percent for this year.Source: NAFB News Service SHARE Sales of Precision Farm Services Expected to Slowlast_img read more

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Six things every business plan needs

first_img SHARE Sponsored Content – Farm Credit Mid-America[acm-tag id=”pixel”]It’s easy to know you need a business plan, but it’s harder to know exactly what to include. Business plans tend to follow a standard format, and many online resources and templates online can be adapted for your operation. Make your plan as simple or as complex as you like. The main goal is to create a plan that is useful to you and meets your needs.At Farm Credit Mid-America, we recommend including the following components in your business plan:Operation overview. This is the “elevator pitch” about your farm. Describe the basics of your operation related to your mission and objectives, crops you produce and acreage.Ownership summary. Include information about ownership and company structure. With any type of business, different owners bring different expertise. It’s always good to evaluate each owner’s strengths and what he or she brings to the operation.Strengths and weaknesses. Identify ways to use your ownership team’s strengths to your advantage and plan for ways to overcome any weaknesses in your operation.Sales and marketing strategy. Once you have identified your operation’s strengths, look for opportunities to leverage them to your competitive advantage as you create sales and marketing strategies.Financials (budget and balance sheet). This is the most important part of your business plan. Include a budget and a balance sheet that reflects your assets, liabilities and net worth.Goals. Research has shown that the simple act of recording goals will increase the likelihood of achieving them.In the budget section, project income and expenses for the upcoming year. This is not a time to be optimistic. It is best to plan for the worst-case scenario. Try to avoid underestimating expenses or overestimating income.The balance sheet helps you understand and evaluate working capital and net worth. Comparing balance sheets year-over-year offers a good picture of how your operation is progressing toward your goals. Your net worth should increase steadily each year. If not, that’s a red flag.Write down both short- and long-term goals, such as purchasing a new combine or paying down debt. Your goals should be SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and timebound). Remember to involve all owners in identifying and setting goals.Also, identify risks that may impede your goals and create a contingency plan for them. The more you prepare for challenges, the easier they will be to deal with when they do occur. For example, crop insurance is one smart way to mitigate damages from drought, flooding and other natural disasters.Including the above components will ensure your business plan works hard for you and your operation. Be sure to update your information and revisit your plan on a regular basis. An accurate and updated business plan is a powerful tool that can open up many opportunities.For additional financial tips, insights and perspectives, visit Farm Credit Mid-America Insights. Soybean ZSN21 (JUL 21) 1508.50 -35.50 Wheat ZWN21 (JUL 21) 680.75 -3.00 Name Sym Last Change How Indiana Crops are Faring Versus Other States SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Oct 10, 2016 Lean Hogs HEM21 (JUN 21) 122.68 0.22 Feeder Cattle GFQ21 (AUG 21) 151.18 2.78 Six things every business plan needs Corn ZCN21 (JUL 21) 684.50 -14.50 Facebook Twitter Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for October 10, 2016Next articleMorning Outlook Hoosier Ag Today RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Live Cattle LEM21 (JUN 21) 118.70 1.13 Facebook Twitter Battle Resistance With the Soy Checkoff ‘Take Action’ Program Home News Feed Six things every business plan needs Minor Changes in June WASDE Report All quotes are delayed snapshots STAY CONNECTED5,545FansLike3,961FollowersFollow187SubscribersSubscribelast_img read more

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Only the Strong Will Survive in a Tough Farm Economy

first_img SHARE Only the Strong Will Survive in a Tough Farm Economy SHARE By Gary Truitt – Feb 21, 2017 Previous articleResolution Designates Indiana Agricultural Literacy WeekNext articleMidwest Lawmakers Seek E-15 Volatility Relief from New EPA Chief Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Only the Strong Will Survive in a Tough Farm Economy Only the Strong Will Survive in a Tough Farm EconomyDr. Matt RobertsIt has been a common theme at winter farm meetings this year: concern about the future farm economy and how to survive it. This was the case at the First Farmers Bank and Trust meeting held in Marion on Tuesday.  The presentation given by Dr. Matt Roberts, with The Kernmantle Group and formerly with Ohio University Extension, stressed that only “strong” farms stand a good chance of surviving the tough economic times ahead.  He urged growers to think of their farming operations as separate parts of a whole, “A modern grain farm is really made up of 6 different businesses: agronomy, land ownership, futures speculations, grain elevation, custom machine operation, and capital allocation.”  He added each segment must be as efficient and forward thinking as possible to  survive in the times ahead. Roberts suggested that this segmentation might even go as far as having a separate balance sheet for each field to better determine cost of production and profit potential on different fields.  He said this approach can help determine if a cash rent agreement is worth it for a particular piece of ground.Roberts said one of the most important factors that will determine an operations survivability is its land costs. “One of the biggest differences between high cost and low cost producers is land rent. I think what will determine who thrives and survives in the next few years will be who can get their land costs under control,” he stated.  He sees land values continuing to fall, but believes this will not have a detrimental impact on agriculture. He said 60% of Midwest farmland is cash rented. Thus, if a farm fails, that land will just be farmed by someone else.Roberts said building a strong farm is also building a legacy. By keeping food records, collecting lots of data, and planning for the future, growers can not only assure their farms will be strong enough to handle tough times, but that they will be a legacy that can pass along to the next generation.The First Farmers Bank and Trust annual seminar always draws a good crowd for a good program. There were, however, a few empty chairs this year because some producers stayed home to apply anhydrous as the late February temperatures climbed above 60 degrees.last_img read more

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Indiana Swine Genetics Company Sharpens Focus

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Swine Genetics Company Sharpens Focus SHARE Indiana Swine Genetics Company Sharpens Focus By Hoosier Ag Today – Jun 12, 2017 Changes in swine geneticsIn the past swine genetics was focused primarily on feed efficiency, but at World Pork Expo one Indiana based breeding stock company has changed their focus. Clyde Shaffer with Shaffer Genetics in Albany, Indiana says changes in consumer preferences has brought about changes in swine genetics.“With the way the country wants to buy meat they are more worried about meat quality, marbling, the ph levels, the inter muscular fat, so in the last four years, on our Duroc lines we’ve been scanning for IMF, inner muscular fat, so we can select pigs that still have good growth, good feed efficiency, but increased meat quality,” he explained.Shaffer says in addition to meeting the needs of consumers, they must also meet the needs of their clients, which are smaller, independent farmers, but Shaffer Genetics is also doing business internationally and Clyde says genetic requirements in foreign countries don’t always match those in the U.S.“Depends on the country, Japan, yes, very similar, South Korea meat quality is a top priority, but when you get to Thailand, Vietnam, the other Asian countries, China, which we are focused in, they are still a little behind us in what they want, they are still looking for volume of product, not that they don’t like good pork chops like American’s do, but at this point their goal is production focused, they need to raise enough pigs to feed their people.” Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleWSJ Got It Wrong About Rural AmericaNext articleBower Trading Strategy Report: Ignore the Report, Watch the Weather Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

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Indiana Farm Leaders Attend Farm Progress Show

first_img The first day of the 2019 Farm Progress show in Decatur, IL opened under sunny skies and mild temperatures.An overnight rain, however, muddied the parking areas and canceled the field demonstrations for the first day.Crowds were light as economic concerns kept many growers at home. Indiana Lt. Governor Crouch was not one to say home but walked the show on Tuesday and visit many exhibits of Indiana companies.This was Crouch’s third Farm Progress Show and she told HAT she is continually impressed with the advancements in technology on display at the show.She noted that almost all of this new technology is dependent on high speed broadband coverage and that is why it is vital to improve coverage in Indiana.“A Purdue report estimates that about 500,000 Hoosiers that were in internet darkness. If all those Hoosiers were connected it would mean $1 billion to our state’s economy,” said Crouch.She added Governor Holcomb’s efforts to improve broad and coverage will help Indiana’s agricultures industry thrive and survive and improve the lives of rural farm families.Another issue vital to the growth of Indiana, according to o that Crouch, is passage of the USMCA trade agreement by Congress, “We need to get Congress to pass USMCA so the U.S. and work with Canada and Mexico to feed not only our own country but the rest of the world.”She said Indiana was the first state to have a trade mission visit Mexico after they signed the agreement, “U.S. farmers need the same opportunity.”Crouch will be able to press her case for USMCA when she meets later this week with Indiana Congressional members as well as USDA Under Secretary of Trade Ted McKinney who will be visiting South Bend and Lafayette.ISDA Director Bruce Kettler is schedule to visit the Farm Progress Show on Wednesday. It is expected he will have the chance to visit with Ag Secretary sunny Perdue who will attend the show. Listen for more coverage of the Farm Progress show on Hoosier Ag today radio stations across the state. Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Farm Leaders Attend Farm Progress Show Indiana Farm Leaders Attend Farm Progress Show By Gary Truitt – Aug 27, 2019 Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Farm Forecast for August 28, 2019Next articleIndiana Farm Leaders Attend Farm Progress Show on the HAT Wednesday Morning Edition Gary Truitt Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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McKinney Will Lead Trade Mission to Vietnam

first_img Previous articleHarvest Forecast: Getting Through the Cold Before Warmer Air ComesNext articleMore Optimism Surrounding USMCA Passage NAFB News Service By NAFB News Service – Oct 13, 2019 McKinney Will Lead Trade Mission to Vietnam SHARE Facebook Twitter USDA Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs Ted McKinney will lead a trade mission to Vietnam on October 15-18.It’s a large trade mission as McKinney will be accompanied by almost 80 industry and government representatives looking to grow agricultural export opportunities into one of the fastest-growing regions in the world.The mission will be based in Ho Chi Minh City, and it will also include buyer delegations from Thailand and Burma.“The size of this trade mission speaks to the phenomenal potential that exists for U.S. exports in Vietnam and the surrounding countries,” McKinney says. “Since the United States normalized relations with Vietnam in 1995, our agricultural exports have grown exponentially, reaching a record $4 billion last year.”Sales of U.S. food and farm products to Thailand and Burma also set records last year, reaching more than $2.1 billion and $126 million, respectively.The heads of six state departments of agriculture from Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming will join McKinney on the trip.Officials from agriculture companies and commodity organizations will also be making the journey to Asia with McKinney. Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News McKinney Will Lead Trade Mission to Vietnamlast_img read more

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Harvest Loss Due to Cutterbar Operating Too High

first_imgHome News Feed Harvest Loss Due to Cutterbar Operating Too High Facebook Twitter Harvest Loss Due to Cutterbar Operating Too High Harvest loss due to cutterbar operating too high. Photo by Mike Staton, MSU Extension.Mike Staton MSU ExtensionDue to the delayed planting and dry weather that occurred in July and August of 2019, the plants in many soybean fields are short and podded close to the ground. The main problems that occur when harvesting short beans are failing to gather the short plants into the combine after they have been cut and failing to cut the plants low enough to harvest the lowest pods on the plants. Michigan State University Extension suggests the following recommendations to help reduce these important sources of gathering loss.Position the cutterbar as close to the ground as possible. Check and adjust the skid shoes on the bottom of the header to lower the cutterbar. You may need to increase the angle of the header to lower the front of the cutterbar (3 degrees is a good starting point). This is a balancing act, as too much of an angle may increase the potential to pick up soil and stones leading to more broken guards and knife sections and cause cut plants and loose beans to build up on the cutterbar. Too flat of an angle may leave unharvested pods on the stubble due to a higher cutting height.Purchase a Crary Wind System or an AWS Airbar, as the air stream produced by this equipment effectively moves short plants and loose beans and pods to the auger or belt. Follow the manufacturers recommendations for positioning the outlets on the drop tubes to maximize performance.Remove the stone guard on the cutterbar if it is preventing short plants, loose beans and pods from moving to the auger or belt and you do not have an air-assisted reel.Harvest on a slight angle (15 to 20 degrees) in fields planted in 15-inch or 30-inch rows. This will usually help the short plants feed into the combine more uniformly.The position of the reel will be critical to reducing gathering losses when harvesting short plants. With auger heads, positioning the reel as close to the auger as possible provides the most uniform feeding under most conditions. However, you may need to experiment with fore and aft reel position with very short plants. Lowering the reel is recommended when plants are short to prevent the plants and beans from building up on the cutterbar. The tips of the reel fingers should be about 0.625 inches above the top of the guards or the header floor.Set the speed of the reel about 10% faster than the ground speed and adjust as necessary to improve feeding.Set the speed of the belts on draper heads fast enough to assure plant material isn’t building up on the cutterbar.Experiment with your groundspeed to find the sweet spot where the cut plants are feeding well and the stubble is cut cleanly and uniformly.Reduce shatter losses by harvesting in the morning or evening when relative humidity is higher.Implement the recommendations provided in this article, in your operator’s manual and by your local equipment dealer to solve any soybean harvest challenges you encounter this fall. Previous articleYield Reports Continue to be Highly VariableNext articleBurnin the Bean Episode 13 – MyLDC and Grain Mkt Texts Hoosier Ag Today SHARE SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Nov 1, 2019 Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Drought Conditions Persist in the Main Corn Growing States

first_img SHARE By NAFB News Service – Mar 7, 2021 Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Drought Conditions Persist in the Main Corn Growing States Drought Conditions Persist in the Main Corn Growing States SHARE As farmers are ramping up toward planting season, drought conditions continue in many of the top corn-growing states. Last week, the U.S. drought monitor showed 11 percent of Midwest acres are in moderate drought. Over half of the High Plains are in a severe drought, and 19 percent of the region is experiencing extreme drought conditions.For example, Iowa, the number one corn-producing state, faces extreme drought conditions in the northwest part of the state. Roughly 10 percent of Iowa is in a severe drought.Soil moisture is more favorable in Illinois, but the central part of that state is abnormally dry. A small part of the east-central region is in moderate drought.Nearly all of Nebraska faces some moisture stress at this point, with the southwest corner of the state in extreme drought. The entire state of Minnesota is abnormally dry, with about 40 percent of the state, especially in the northern third, in moderate drought.Only nine percent of the acres in Indiana are in moderate drought, primarily in the northwest part of the state. More than half of Kansas is abnormally dry, while drought conditions are severe in half of South Dakota.Ohio and Missouri have much less drought to deal with than other states. About 61 percent of Wisconsin is abnormally dry, with almost half of Michigan in the same category. Previous articleHoosier Ag This Week Podcast for March 6th, 2021Next articleCorn Export Sales Drop to New Marketing-Year Low Point NAFB News Servicelast_img read more

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Beyoncé sparking discussions on race; students offer their takes

first_imgFacebook Beyoncé performs during halftime of the NFL Super Bowl 50 football game Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, in Santa Clara, Calif. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) Twitter Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/ ReddIt TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Emily Laff is a senior journalism major (and die-hard Broncos fan) from Denver, Colorado. When she is not out reporting she is most likely at a Krispy Kreme drive-through or in an aisle at Barnes & Noble. TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summer + posts Emily Laff Previous articlePitch Perfect became a reality for TCU a cappellaNext articleTCU professor gives tips on managing stress Emily Laff RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR via GIPHYJunior Judy Emiodi said she liked that Beyoncé used her platform to create something powerful.“She’s one of the most influential musicians of our time right now,” Emiodi said. “Not only did she verbally sing her song but she also used visuals.”Like Beyoncé, Kendrick Lamar used visuals during the Grammy’s to depict his point of view.Kendrick Lamar started his Grammy performance in chains and his band behind bars– allegedly signifying the chains of slavery and incarceration rates among African American men.via GIPHYFirst-year Sam Luke said the imagery from Lamar’s performance resonated with him, and was reminiscent of a similar music video by Michael Jackson.“I’ve never seen anything like that done at the Grammy’s. When he came out with the chained handcuffs and wore the blue on blue– that really popped out to me.”Other students on campus said all of Kendrick Lamar’s songs are just as empowering as his performance at the Grammys.“When it’s all said and done he will have contributed so much not only to music but to society as a whole  even making younger listeners feel empowered,” said sophomore George Chumas.While some voiced positive responses, other students were more hesitant to share dissenting opinions about artists using their platform to send a message about the black  experience.Abel Perez-Arita agreed with the majority of students interviewed that music was a good way to share important social commentary.“Hopefully we get more activists in the media who want to represent what’s actually happening in the world rather than coating it with a soft fabrication of what we “should” be believing as opposed to what actually is happening.” The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years White supremacy posters on TCU’s campus under investigationcenter_img Students react to controversial speaker’s views on radical Islam TCU tells Greeks: No Hazing Linkedin Twitter Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/ printThis February, music is speaking louder than words.Bold performances from Beyoncé and  Kendrick Lamar have spurred conversations on TCU’s campus about race and its role in music.Beyoncé’s latest music video, released a day prior to her halftime performance of the song at the Super Bowl, received both criticism and praise for her homage to the African American struggle.The video for the song “Formation” features impactful images of Beyoncé on top of a police car submerged in water, an homage to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Southern plantation imagery, as well as a wall graffitied with the words “Stop Killing Us”, and policemen surrendering to an African American boy.via GIPHYvia GIPHYvia GIPHYThis imagery surprised and sometimes offended Beyoncé fans, but TCU students like Clémence Paiement were pleasantly surprised.“I think that white people got kind of confused because Beyoncé has been doing music that touches more people that doesn’t focus on the black people,” Paiement said. “For me it’s like a new Beyoncé.”Her Super Bowl performance of the song “Formation” received backlash for the costumes that resembled that of the Black Panther Party. The party dates back to 1966, as a revolutionary black nationalist and socialist group known for armed controversy  and raising awareness about police brutality. Linkedin Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/ Facebook ReddIt TCU parking: No room on the asphalt Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/last_img read more

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