Why Invest in Global Research & Development?

first_imgThere is nothing like getting on an international phone call at 11pm for the latest status update on an important development project.  Or doing a performance review 10 time zones away in a language you are not sure is well understood by the recipient. Or being questioned by your boss about the likelihood of making an on-time delivery next week when the development team is in Brazil and Carnival starts in two days.Conducting research and development internationally is complicated. So why bother? A controller might say something about how labor is less expensive in many places outside the U.S. and it’s all about cost containment.  It is time to reset some misconceptions  and directly address the reality of the situation.Let’s focus on the IT market, one we at EMC love and understand. How did SAP get started? Kaspersky Security? Those ubiquitous USB drives? How about the avatars you see when playing with an Xbox gaming console? Or the ARM chips that are found in more than 60% of the world’s mobile devices? None of these products was invented or developed in the U.S.!The fact that Silicon Valley, Boston, New York, Seattle and a few other U.S. locations have so many more startups than other places around the world leads some people to think it is enough to depend only on what can be found in the U.S. This is certainly not the case if you want innovative technology such as the internationally-developed products mentioned in the previous paragraph, which represent just a small subset of the universe of those invented outside of the U.S.In addition to product innovation, access to very talented people is another great reason to be developing products in locations such as Rio de Janeiro, St. Petersburg and Chengdu (a subset of locations where EMC has established R&D centers and Centers of Excellence or COEs around the world). The large number of patents filed from our international locations is a huge proof point here.  Just think, the fastest growing product line in EMC’s entire history – the market leading all-flash storage array XtremIO – was originally conceived and developed OUTSIDE the U.S., in Israel.And finally, it’s projected that more than half the growth in the IT market over the next 10 years will come from emerging economies (not to mention that approximately half of EMC’s revenue comes from outside the U.S.). When making purchase decisions, these emerging countries are showing very clear preference for companies that have local R&D and/or manufacturing facilities.  So if you want to be a growth-oriented multinational technology company, you NEED to establish an R&D presence in these rapidly expanding markets.  And it’s not always necessary to establish a COE or an R&D center.  Often funding a university research project or hiring a professor is enough to get started.  That’s just what we’re looking to do in countries like Colombia and Kazakhstan.Keep these considerations in mind the next time you are sitting in on a status meeting at midnight your local time. Global R&D is ESSENTIAL for both INNOVATION and revenue GROWTH.last_img read more

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Oakland terminates lease at planned coal export facility

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Mercury News:In a major setback to a years-long effort to reinvent the former Oakland Army Base, the city has terminated its lease with developer Phil Tagami, effectively putting an end to his controversial plan to build a marine terminal and export coal, according to letters sent last month by city attorneys.City officials in those letters said Tagami has failed to meet construction milestones agreed upon in the lease, and sent him a notice of default on October 23. The default notice said Tagami must pay the city $1.6 million in project liquidated damages as specified in the 66-year lease.“This isn’t about coal. This is about the developer’s failure to meet its obligations and perform the work it agreed to do. (The developer) had years to move this project forward, and has used every excuse in the book to justify its failure to perform,” City Attorney Barbara Parker said in a statement.After years of planning, the military turned over the shuttered base to the city and Port of Oakland in 2006. The city had flirted with several different visions for its half of the property before giving Tagami the green light for a $1 billion state-of-the-art logistics center and marine terminal in 2012. Among them were an Indian casino, hotel, convention center, and, if a failed plan by Keenen Ivory Wayans had come to pass, a movie studio and entertainment village.The once-touted terminal project had already run afoul of Oakland city leaders, who belatedly voted to ban coal after learning of Tagami’s surreptitious deal with Utah coal companies to ship their product overseas. Tagami sued and the battle landed in federal court. In May, U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria struck down the city’s coal ban, a decision the city is appealing.Now it appears there will be a new court fight over the terminated lease. Last month, Tagami and his business partner, Mark McClure, filed a 51-page claim against the city, a precursor to a lawsuit.More: Oakland tells Phil Tagami coal project is over, terminates Army base lease Oakland terminates lease at planned coal export facilitylast_img read more

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County judges join education effort

first_imgCounty judges join education effort Will work with the Dignity in Law program County judges join education effort Mark D. Killian Managing Editor Inspired by the Bar’s efforts to tell the whole story about the positive work lawyers engage in across Florida, the Conference of County Court Judges has launched “Trumpet Your Gavel,” a program designed to educate the public on the role and function of the courts.“We need to let the public know what the judges are doing, in and out of the courtroom, to really change lives and improve the system,” said Miami-Dade County Judge Beth Bloom, the conference’s new president.After reading about Bar President Tod Aronovitz’ Dignity in Law initiative, Judge Bloom said she was convinced the judges needed to offer their support and involvement in the effort to clear up the misperceptions about lawyers and judges.“I saw the focus was on lawyers and judges and I thought, ‘You know what, we need to do something,’” Bloom said, adding that telling the public about the good works of judges “leads to public confidence in our court system because people see there may be some bad apples, but you know what, for the most part there are many, many wonderful judges who work tirelessly in their communities.”Judge Bloom said the conference has a Public Education on the Court Team in each of the state’s 20 judicial circuits, which she has tasked with finding stories about judges doing good works. Once the stories have been identified, the Bar’s Dignity in Law program has agreed to help the conference disseminate that information to the media.Bloom said examples of some of those stories include:• A judge in Jackson County who, when he observed that many of the defendants before him on bad check charges were terrible in managing their finances, worked with local banks to set up a money management course for those convicted of writing bad checks. He then makes attending the class part of his sentences, and if the defendant passes the class and makes restitution, they are entitled to a free checking account.• An Orange County judge who has taught a newlywed course for married couples at his local church for 20 years. The course deals with communication skills, parenting, and how to work out conflicts within the family.• A Dade County judge who kept a family together after a mother was charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor when her child missed 42 days of school. “Rather than imposing jail, what this judge did was creatively suspended entry of the sentence upon the condition that the mother physically brought the child to school everyday,” Judge Bloom said. “And you know what, the child is in school and is doing well.”• A Monroe County judge who added a physical exercise component to her drug court. “She is an avid marathon runner who requires every defendant to either walk or run with her and she does this three times a week and it is a condition of probation,” Judge Bloom said, adding that studies have showed that physical exercise contributes to curing addiction.“These are just examples of wonderful, wonderful programs that our judges have put together,” Judge Bloom said. “It’s nice to see we are getting positive stories out there about the positive work judges are doing.” In Other Action Judge Bloom said the pending transition from county to state funding of the courts, a review of single-tier trial court models, and working with the legislature to improve the system are high on the agenda of the Conference of County Court Judges.Judge Bloom said she created three new presidential committees to deal with those issues.A new Article V Committee will be “crucial” as the conference works with the Florida Supreme Court and the legislature in implementing the Revision 7, which requires the state to pick up the bulk of court system funding by July 1, 2004.“What we are seeing is there are many programs and services that are unique to the county courts that are really in jeopardy of not being funded because historically they have been funded by the counties,” Bloom said, adding the committee will work to bring those programs to the attention of Trial Court Budget Commission and legislative leaders in an effort to preserve them.The Single Tier/Concurrent Jurisdiction Committee is charged with conducting a comprehensive review of the many single tier court models proposed over the years.“Over the years I have seen a variety of interpretations by what we mean by concurrent jurisdiction and while we all know what a single-tier means — a single-tier trial court system — when we talk about concurrent jurisdiction there have been so many different models and it has been hard to grasp a true understanding as to how it impacts upon the county courts,” Bloom said. “It is clear that where a judge stands on this issue often depends on where that judge sits because a smaller county has different needs than a larger county. This review will give us some guidance to where we want to go in the future.”Bloom said that another committee is comprised on the 34 county judges who are the only county judge in their county.“It will focus on issues unique to those judges, such as resources, travel, education needs, and court technology,” Bloom said. “There are some judges who don’t even have a computer, let alone e-mail.”Bloom also said new State Courts Administratior Robin Lubitz has agreed to appoint one staff person from the Office of the State Courts Administrator to serve as a liaison with each of the conference’s 14 standing committees and eight presidential committees.“We already had a wonderful working relationship and now it is going to be stronger through the resources of OSCA,” Bloom said. August 15, 2002 Managing Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Court disciplines lawyers for ‘1-800 PIT BULL’ TV ad

first_imgCourt disciplines lawyers for ‘1-800 PIT BULL’ TV ad Court disciplines lawyers for ‘1-800 PIT BULL’ TV ad The Ft. Lauderdale attorneys vow USSC appeal Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Two lawyers who used a pit bull logo and displayed the phone number 1-800 PIT BULL in their television ad have been disciplined by the Supreme Court for violating Florida Bar advertising rules.The court overruled the recommendation of the referee in the case and found the ad was not protected by the First Amendment. It approved a public reprimand for the lawyers and ordered them to attend the Bar’s Advertising Workshop within the next six months.The lawyers involved, John Pape and Marc Chandler of Ft. Lauderdale, say they plan to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court and won’t seek a rehearing from the state’s high court.“I don’t believe that we are going to seek a rehearing. From a practical standpoint, it was a unanimous decision; there was no equivocation. I don’t think it would be very fruitful,” Chandler said. “We are going to appeal.”The court ruled unanimously in the November 17 opinion, holding that the ad violated Bar rules because the image of the pit bull objectively had nothing to do with the type of services being provided by the law firm and improperly described the law firm’s services.“These devices, which invoke the breed of dog known as the pit bull, demean all lawyers and thereby harm both the legal profession and the public’s trust and confidence in our system of justice,” Pariente wrote. “We conclude that attorneys [John] Pape and [Marc] Chandler. . . violated Rules Regulating The Florida Bar 4-7.2(b)(3) and 4-7.2(b)(4) by using the image of a pit bull and displaying the term ‘pit bull’ as part of their firm’s phone number in their commercial. Further, because the use of an image of a pit bull and the phrase ‘pit bull’ in the firm’s advertisement and logo does not assist the public in ensuring that an informed decision is made prior to the selection of the attorney, we conclude that the First Amendment does not prevent this court from sanctioning the attorneys based on the rule violations.”Pariente noted that the referee found that pit bulls are perceived as “loyal, persistent, tenacious, and aggressive” and were objectively relevant in the selection of an attorney, were not manipulative, and were protected by the First Amendment.The referee also said the 1-800 PIT BULL phone number in the ad was merely a useful way to get the public to remember the law firm’s phone number. And the referee said the pit bull did not characterize the quality of legal services provided by the lawyers, but rather the quality or characteristics of the lawyers.The court, though, rejected those findings.The referee’s differentiation on quality of services “is an artificial distinction,” the court said. “At the very least, the printed words and the image of a pit bull in the television commercial could certainly be perceived by prospective clients as characterizing the quality of the lawyers’ services.” That violates Rule 4-7.2(b)(3) which prohibits self-laudatory language or words that characterize the quality of a lawyer’s or law firm’s services.The court also concluded that the drawing of the pit bull in the ad was not objectively relevant to selecting a lawyer as required in Rule 4-7.2(b)(4). Such a drawing would only be permissible if the firm specialized in dog bite cases, Pariente said, noting the U.S. Supreme Court in one of its lawyer advertising rulings held that a drawing of a fist would not be allowed in ads.“The logo of the pit bull wearing a spiked collar and the prominent display of the phone number. . . are more manipulative and misleading than a drawing of a fist,” the opinion said. “These advertising devices would suggest to many persons not only that the lawyers can achieve results, but also they engage in a combative style of advocacy.”There is also no way to objectively measure if the lawyers conduct themselves like pit bulls, according to the opinion.In rejecting the referee’s findings that pit bulls had a positive image of loyalty and tenacity, the court noted that several cities have banned them; one study found more people killed by pit bulls (including some pit bull owners) than any other breed, and that pit bulls have been bred to fight other dogs or track and attack other animals. Those are not images, the court said, it wants associated with the legal profession.“Prohibiting advertisements such as the one in this case is one step we can take to maintain the dignity of lawyers, as well as the integrity of, and public confidence in, the legal system,” Pariente wrote. “Were we to approve the referee’s finding, images of sharks, wolves, crocodiles, and piranhas would follow. For the good of the legal profession and the justice system, and consistent with our Rules of Professional Conduct, this type of non-factual advertising cannot be permitted.”As for First Amendment issues, the court cited several U.S. Supreme Court cases. It then concluded that, “Lawyer advertising enjoys First Amendment protection only to the extent that it provides accurate factual information that can be objectively verified. This thread runs throughout the pertinent United State Supreme Court precedent.. . . “[T]he logo and phone number do not convey objectively relevant information about the attorneys’ practice. Instead, the image and words ‘pit bull’ are intended to convey an image about the nature of the lawyers’ litigation tactics. We conclude that an advertising device that connotes combativeness and viciousness without providing accurate and objectively verifiable factual information falls outside the protections of the First Amendment.”Chandler said he and Pape had a different conception of pit bulls and how the breed is perceived.“The attributes which we attributed to a pit bull are strength, courage,. . . and tenacity and we think those are all traits that a potential legal consumer should and would want in an attorney,” he said. “We’re not the only people that attribute those qualities to the dog. The United Kennel Club attributes them.”As for the phone number, Chandler said that was an easy way to get potential clients to remember how to contact them.“We thought it was a good mnemonic device to help people who saw the ad remember the number,” he said. “The fact is the person who sees the ad is going to glean some information from the ad. If you give them a number they can’t remember, then they are not going to be able to use the information.”A grievance case against Chandler and Pape was originally filed in 2001, and the initial grievance committee dismissed it but issued a letter of advice. A second complaint was filed alleging violation of different Bar rules (the Bar also could have refiled the initial complaint since it was dismissed without a finding of no probable cause) and went to the statewide grievance committee set up to handle advertising complaints. That committee found probable cause that the ad violated Bar advertising rules. But in the resulting hearing, the referee said the ad did not violate the rules and that the First Amendment protected the use of the pit bull logo and the 1-800 PIT BULL number. The Bar then appealed that finding to the Supreme Court.In their brief to the Supreme Court, Pape argued for the two attorneys that the Bar failed to present any evidence at the hearing before the referee that the two violated Bar rules or that their ad wasn’t protected by the First Amendment. They also argued that little evidence was presented that the public negatively perceives pit bulls.Indeed, Pape contended if the desire had been to invoke an image of viciousness or ruthlessness, “Respondents could have more easily and effectively conveyed those ideas by using a snarling dog bearing his fangs, showing a menacing expression, standing in attack mode, or actually attacking.”Nor, he argued, did the Bar ever attempt to establish the two attorneys’ motive for using the logo and phone number.“Complainant has evidently conjured omnipotent powers to come to the unwavering conclusion that ‘the reality of the matter is that respondents do not use a 1-800 PIT BULL telephone number and a pit bull logo showing a pit bull wearing a spiked collar for the purpose of associating themselves with the positive traits of pit bulls, such as ‘loyalty,’” Pape argued.He also asserted that the Bar did not meet any of the requirements of a long line of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on First Amendment protections of commercial speech.“Without proof or even the barest allegation that the logo and telephone number are false, misleading or deceptive, complainant stated no constitutional ground upon which a restriction of respondents’ commercial free speech may lie,” Pape wrote.The complete opinion and the briefs for The Florida Bar v. John Robert Pape, case no. SC04-40, and The Florida Bar v. Marc Andrew Chandler, case no. SC04-41, can be found at the court’s Web site at www.floridasupremecourt.org.center_img December 15, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

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North Amityville Armed Home Invasion Probed

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are searching for three suspects who committed an armed home invasion in North Amityville on Wednesday afternoon.Three men broke into an Ephesus Place home, confronted residents inside and flashed a silver handgun shortly after 1 p.m., according to a police spokesman.The trio stole cash, jewelry and electronic equipment before they fled the scene. The victims were not injured.The suspects were described as black men, two of whom were 5-feet, 11-inches tall with muscular builds. The third was described as 5-feet, 6-inches tall and slim.First Squad detectives are continuing the investigation. No further details were released.The case is the 13th armed home invasion in Suffolk following a dozen similar cases in a six-week span between the first two months of this year—three of which involved shootings, one fatal.last_img read more

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What NCUA’s proposed rule on derivative use could mean for your credit union

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jake King Jake King joined ALM First Financial Advisors in 2016. As a Sr. Associate in the Funds Management Group, Jake is primarily responsible for the management of derivative and funding analytics. … Web: https://www.almfirst.com Details On October 15, 2020 the NCUA Board of Directors unanimously approved a proposed rule that would ease regulations on derivative use, open the scope of permissible derivatives, and make it easier for Federal Credit Unions to hedge their balance sheet interest rate risk using derivatives. Institutions that already have derivative approval would be subject to the terms and conditions of the final ruling. The proposed rule will be open for comment for 60 days following its publication in the Federal Register. ALM First applauds the NCUA staff and Board for proposing more principles-based regulations on derivatives and our comments will reflect this support.§703.111 NCUA ApprovalIf the proposed rule is finalized, the first big takeaway will be the elimination of the preapproval process for certain Federal Credit Unions. Complex institutions with greater than $500 million in assets and a Management Component CAMEL rating of 1 or 2 could begin using derivatives by providing their Regional Director a written notification within 5 days of entering the first derivative transaction. It is important to note that there will still be due diligence needed from an institution prior to engaging in a derivatives transaction. This would include getting the Board and staff comfortable with derivatives, ensuring the accounting for derivatives is squared away, and reporting is handled. Under the proposed rule, these would be best practice measures – not regulatory requirements for approval. The removal of the preapproval process would make derivatives more accessible and provide institutions a useful tool for the management of their interest rate risk.§703.102 Permissible DerivativesNext, the proposed rule would remove references to specific product types that are permissible for use, allowing credit unions to use more forms of derivatives. They must be used for hedging interest rate risk and meet the requirements listed below:Denominated in U.S. dollars.Based on Domestic Interest Rates or dollar-denominated LIBOR (the Board is currently monitoring the LIBOR transition and will make any necessary changes to the final rule)Contract maturity equal to 15 years or less.Not used to create Structured Liability Offerings for members or nonmembers.Currently credit unions are only allowed to hedge with interest rate swaps up to 90-day settlement, interest rate caps, interest rate floors, basis swaps, and U.S. Treasury futures. While these instruments can be used to hedge the lion’s share of interest rate risk, a broader suite of instruments is always preferred. For example, an interest rate swaption can be a very effective hedge for convexity risk for credit unions that are heavily concentrated in mortgages. The price profile of a mortgage and a swaption are tightly aligned which makes it effective in hedging mortgages.In addition to the removal of references to specific product types, there will also be changes to the products and characteristics. There will no longer be forward start date limitations. This will allow for an institution to engage in a derivative that does not settle within 90 days. Also, the new rule would remove fluctuating notional amount limits. This would allow all Federal Credit Unions to use amortizing derivatives.Another limitation that would be removed with the rule change is the general investment authority as it pertains to Mutual Funds. Under the current rule, any investment companies or collective investment funds that include derivatives in the investment portfolio are not permitted for investment by Federal credit unions. The new rule would allow Federal credit unions to invest in mutual funds that use derivatives for the purposes of hedging interest rate risk. It is important to note that any mutual funds that use derivatives related to equities, credit, or commodities will still be restricted.§703.103 Derivative AuthorityLastly, the proposed rule would result in an ease on regulations. The proposed rule would remove all limitations that are set forth in the current §703.103. This would remove the entry limits and standard limits authorities as it pertains to fair value losses and WARMN limits. The fair value loss limits are currently stated as 15% of net worth for entry level and 25% of net worth for standard level. The WARMN calculations adjust the notional amount of a derivative to account for remaining maturity and price sensitivity. Exhibit 1 shows how the WARMN is calculated. The current limits stated are a 65% of net worth entry limit for 12 months and 100% of net worth thereafter. Because of this, institutions are restricted on the notional amount of longer-term swaps as they are weighted more heavily in the calculation due to their longer maturity. An example of this is shown in Exhibit 2. The original notional amounts for both the 5-year and 10-year swap are $50 million. However, with the current WARMN rules, only $25 million of the 5-year would count towards the regulatory limit while the full $50 million of the 10-year would count. Removal of this regulation will allow institutions to hedge interest rate risk more effectively as there will not be a penalty for extending liability duration with longer term swaps.Going ForwardIn today’s rate environment, being restricted to the short end of the yield curve due to interest rate risk limitations can cause margin compression. Being limited to one part of the curve restricts institutions’ ability to make strategic decisions regarding balance sheet direction. This can lead to adding products to the balance sheet that are not beneficial to the overall profitability of the institution. In addition, removing barriers to the products that can be offered will ultimately benefit the members of an institution. Another trend in 2020 has been an increase in mortgages on the balance sheet due to low-rate induced refinancing. This could add interest rate risk to balance sheets. We believe using derivatives can be a worthwhile tool for any institution with mortgages on the balance sheet or those simply looking to manage margins in the low rate environment. If the rule is finalized, it would provide federally chartered credit unions with greater flexibility in managing interest rate risk and potentially making profitable decisions.Co-authored by Shahid Sattar ALM First Financial Advisors is an SEC registered investment advisor with a fiduciary duty that requires it to act in the best interests of clients and to place the interests of clients before its own; however, registration as an investment advisor does not imply any level of skill or training. ALM First Financial Advisors, LLC (“ALM First Financial Advisors”), an affiliate of ALM First Group, LLC (“ALM First”), is a separate entity and all investment decisions are made independently by the asset managers at ALM First Financial Advisors. Access to ALM First Financial Advisors is only available to clients pursuant to an Investment Advisory Agreement and acceptance of ALM First Financial Advisors’ Brochure. You are encouraged to read these documents carefully. All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of your entire investment.last_img read more

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Failing to check the licences of tradies could be disastrous

first_imgAlmost half of Australians are failing to check the licences of the tradies they hire, according to new research. Photo: Getty ImagesAlmost half of Australians are failing to check the licences of the tradies they hire, according to research.Data from hipages Tradie Trust Index found that 42 per cent of people do not check for licences when hiring tradies, putting them at risk of dodgy home improvements. Annually, Australians spend $73 billion on tradie services, of which approximately $3.4 billion is spent hiring tradies to fix DIY gone wrong.With Aussies engaging an average of seven tradies per year for jobs ranging from plumbers to cleaners, it’s clear that we’re a houseproud bunch. However, homeowners are not always taking these jobs as seriously, failing to follow the proper steps to find qualified licensed tradies to get the job done right from the start.Hipages recommends homeowners follow the trust trifecta which includes requesting a licence, asking for examples of work and reading online recommendations.Hipages chief customer officer Stuart Tucker said: “The key to fostering a trusting two-way relationship is a honest and open line of communication. It’s also advisable to formalise all details of a job in writing, particularly with the amount of responsibility that is transferred onto a tradie. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours ago“This month, hipages has made it even easier for customers to connect with trusted tradies through updates to the platform.“On the Tradie Profile page, customers will be able to clearly view licence numbers for each tradie, as well as licence requirements for their trade categories in the state they service.”Digital and on-demand platforms like the hipages app, which streamlines the tradie recruitment and verification process, have helped reduce research time for homeowners by 80 per cent.Most Australians spend an average 56 minutes per required job, to find and book the necessary tradie online.Meanwhile not only is hipages digitising the process to find a tradie, it is now also digitising the important role that word-of-mouth plays in consumer-tradie engagement. Following the findings of the hipages Tradie Trust Index that revealed 80 per cent of consumers trust word-of-mouth recommendations when selecting a tradie, hipages has introduced a new “Community’’ feed on its app. The new feature allows consumers to log into hipages through their Facebook account, to easily discover which tradies are being recommended and hired by neighbours in their local area, as well as understand who their Facebook friends are booking and recommending to their network. It also presents another avenue for hipages tradies to build their reputation locally.Visit hipages.com.aulast_img read more

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Girls face charges over school bullying attack

first_imgNZ Herald 19 Dec 2011Two 14-year-old girls will face “serious” assault charges after a brutal bully attack on a classmate that left the girl with spinal injuries. Fourteen-year-old Adriana Kemp is recovering in hospital from surgery in which screws were inserted in her skull to keep her spine straight. She was repeatedly punched by two girls at Flaxmere College in Hastings three weeks ago. The assault was filmed by another student on a cellphone. Adriana has been in and out of hospital for checks and scans since the attack.…. Flaxmere police constable Greg Andrews said two 14-year-olds had been interviewed and referred to Youth Aid. The case was being reviewed, but Mr Andrews expected the pair would appear in court. Charges were being finalised but it was a “serious level of assault”.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10774037last_img read more

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PREEMPTIVE STEP: PUV drivers told to wear masks vs nCoV

first_imgThe transport sector which is beingoverseen by the LTFRB is the latest to take preemptive steps to protect itsstakeholders from this new viral infection. Operators of transport terminalswere directed to ensure the proper sanitation and cleanliness of theirfacilities as well as provide facemasks and disinfectants to passengers forfree. For its part, Vallacar Transit,operator of Ceres buses, confirmed having disseminated the LTFRB order to itsdrivers and conductors. Non-compliance would be a violation oftheir jeepney franchises, explained Parcon. It seems to start with a fever,followed by a dry cough and then, after a week, leads to shortness of breath. In Memorandum Circular 2020-005, LTFRBrequired the drivers and conductors “to properly wear facemasks at all timeswhile on duty, and for all franchise holders to ensure their compliance.” But even prior to LTFRB’s order, saidJade Seballos, the legal and media relations officer of Vallacar Transit, theywere already orienting their people about the importance of personal hygiene,especially hand washing. FAITH IN THE TIME OF A VIRUS OUTBREAK. Masked devotees of Nuestra Señora dela Candelaria (Our Lady of Candles) light candles at the Jaro Metropolitan Cathedral in Jaro, Iloilo City. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN Coronaviruses are common, andtypically cause mild respiratory conditions, such as a cough or runny nose. ILOILO City – Public utility vehicledrivers and conductors here have been ordered to wear facemasks by the LandTransportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) as the government stepsup precautionary measures to deter a possible spread of the novel coronavirus(2019-nCoV). Meanwhile, the Iloilo City Alliance ofOperators and Drivers Transport Cooperative (ICAODTC) had a meeting over theweekend with member drivers, operators and public assistant officers(conductors) about the LTFRB order. All drivers and public utility vehicleoperators must comply with the LTFRB order or they would be meted withsanctions, according to Raymundo Parcon, president of the Iloilo City LoopAlliance of Jeepney Operators and Drivers Association (ICLAJODA). The company would be distributing handsanitizers to its drivers although it is having a hard time procuring a bigvolume of facemasks, added Seballos. Avoiding eating raw or undercookedanimal products is also advised. But some are more serious – such asthe deadly SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and Middle East RespiratorySyndrome (Mers). Seballos also assured the ridingpublic that Vallar Transit is fastidious about the cleanliness of their Ceresbuses. But in more severe cases, infectioncan cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and evendeath. People are advised to avoid closecontact with people suffering from acute respiratory infections; wash handsregularly, especially after direct contact with ill people or theirenvironment; and avoid unprotected contact with farm or wild animals. This current outbreak – known as novelcoronavirus (nCoV) – is a new strain that has not been previously identified inhumans. “Bisanmagasto sa part namon, para man ini sa amon safety,” said Parcon. ICAODTC board secretary Rizal Alidosaid they were all cooperative. Most victims have been elderly people,suffering from other chronic diseases. The World Health Organization isadvising people in affected areas to follow standard procedures to reduce thechance of catching the virus. They include hand and respiratory hygiene as wellas safe food practices. He will also be distributingfacemasks, said Parcon, and would further direct drivers to bring with themdisinfectants (alcohol or hand sanitizers). Parcon would be calling for a meetingtoday with ICLAJODA chapter presidents and discuss the LTFRB order. Theassociation has around 3,000 members. Those with symptoms of coronavirusshould practice “cough etiquette”, including maintaining distance, coveringcoughs and sneezes with disposable tissues or the inside of an elbow, andwashing hands. (With a report from theBBC/PN)last_img read more

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Bulldogs Strong Showing In EIAC Tennis Tourney

first_imgThe Batesville High School tennis team claimed a pair of individual Eastern Indiana Athletic Conference titles on Saturday (5-17) at Greensburg High School.Batesville junior Lydia Olsen defeated Rushville’s Katie Schoeder 6-0 and 6-0 in the finals at No. 2 singles to earn all-conference honors. Leading up to the title match, Olsen defeated Olivia Slusher of Greensburg (6-2, 6-1) and East Central’s Alexia Lamberdines (6-0, 6-0).Brooke Bradford and Kelli Hartman won a pair of tough matches on Saturday for the title at No. 1 doubles. Hartman and Bradford beat Welage and Pratt of Greensburg 6-4 and 6-4 in the championship. They defeated DeFiglio and Ashton in the semifinals (6-3, 4-6 and 6-0) and opened on Thursday with a 6-1 and 6-0 win over Brack and Stang of Franklin County.The Lady Bulldogs had a pair of runner-up finishes.Allyson Ritter lost in the championship match at No. 3 singles to East Central’s Sophia Imeroni 6-4, 2-6 and 6-2. She posted wins over Stewart of Franklin county and Harpring of Rushville.Karsen Worthington and Macy Simon teamed up to place second at No. 2 doubles. Kern and Weber were 7-6 and 7-5 winners over Simon and Worthington in the finals. The Batesville duo defeated Nelson and Bailey of Greensburg (6-4, 7-6) in the semifinals and Rushville’s Martin and Hershberger (6-4, 6-4) in the opening round.Batesville senior Sarah Hoseus lost in the semifinal round to eventual conference Most Valuable Player Danielle Schroeder of Greensburg. Schroeder defeated Hoseus 6-3 and 6-3. Hoseus began the tournament on Thursday with a 6-4 and 6-3 over Rushville’s Allison Wainwright.Submitted by Batesville Coach Bryan Helvie.last_img read more

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