Executive Order Instructs HUD to Examine Disparate Impact Rule

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: FHA Announces New Deadline to Request Mortgage Forbearance Next: Florida Supreme Court Rejects ‘No Standing = No Fees’ Rule About Author: Christina Hughes Babb President Joe Biden Tuesday issued a string of executive actions related to racial equality; those included a directive to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to examine the effects of the September 24, 2020, rule entitled “HUD’s Implementation of the Fair Housing Act’s Disparate Impact Standard,” along with additional related instructions.Biden’s memorandum acknowledged the historic role of the federal government in discriminatory housing policy.The President asked HUD to reassess Trump-era edicts, such as the above-mentioned disparate impact rule, which made it harder for plaintiffs to meet the legal threshold for proving unintentional discrimination.The definition adopted under Trump and former HUD Secretary Ben Carson would also grant defendants more latitude to rebut those claims, but a federal court has put the rule on hold pending an ongoing court challenge, Politico reminds readers in an article about today’s executive orders.Acting HUD Secretary Matthew E. Ammon says Biden’s order represents an important step toward “redressing the federal government’s legacy of housing discrimination and securing equal access to housing opportunity for all.”Ammon says that acknowledging housing discrimination is the first step toward lifting barriers to safe affordable housing for all Americans.”Racially discriminatory housing practices and policies have kept communities of color from accessing safe, high-quality housing and the chance to build wealth that comes through homeownership,” he said. “To this day, people of color disproportionately bear the burdens of homelessness, pollution, climate-related housing instability, and economic inequality because of deliberate and systemic efforts to deny them fair and equal access to housing opportunities. “During the signing ceremony at the White House, Biden said he believes the majority of Americans, no matter their political party, share these values.”We have never fully lived up to the founding principles of this nation, to state the obvious, that all people are created equal and have a right to be treated equally throughout their lives.” The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News January 26, 2021 1,111 Views Home / Daily Dose / Executive Order Instructs HUD to Examine Disparate Impact Rule Related Articles Sign up for DS News Daily 2021-01-26 Christina Hughes Babb Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Executive Order Instructs HUD to Examine Disparate Impact Rule Subscribe  Print This Post The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

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Sheep solution

first_imgSheep are a cost-effective and ideal solution to clear the privet, Adams explained, because “unlike cattle, sheep avoid the water’s edge, leaving vulnerable embankments undisturbed. Unlike goats, they do not attempt to strip larger, desirable trees.” Sarah Workman, a natural resources scientist with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Global Programs, is conducting a controlled experiment and demonstration project showing the effectiveness of this natural method for invasive removal within riparian zones, or vegetated corridors along rivers. The grazing project will be featured as part of the 12th Annual North American Agroforestry Conference to be hosted by UGA June 4-9. Jennif Chandler, the enlisted local shepherd, has used her sheep to help clear the David Henry Hardigree Wildlife Sanctuary in Oconee County, as well as in managing her land in Madison County. “One of the best things about using sheep in woodland and riparian areas is that they do not disturb, erode or compact the soil,” said Chandler. “Neither do they damage existing trees. Roots of invasive vegetation will slowly die while roots of trees and other desirable plants move in.” During the last weekend in February, as new privet growth began to emerge, 30 sheep were dispatched to an area between the Oconee River and East Campus. Two donkeys accompanied them to ward off coyotes and other predators and clear higher vegetation. The grounds department plans to pull the sheep after a few weeks of grazing but will return them in the summer to combat resprouting. “The grazing site is currently choked with privet,” said Dexter Adams, director of the UGA Grounds Department. “In addition to forming a nearly impenetrable physical and visual barrier, this invasive plant displaces more diverse and controlled native species.” The project also will enhance visibility and accessibility to the North Oconee River, which is separated by manmade barriers or steep embankments in most other areas of campus. Master planners in the University Architects Office envision a park-like setting in the heart of East Campus where students and faculty can engage with the river for research and recreation. The University of Georgia Grounds Department, in collaboration with several UGA colleges and departments interested in the potential of a novel invasive plant management strategy, has enlisted the help of a shepherd and her small sheep herd to improve access to a major waterway that runs through the UGA campus in Athens. “This project represents an innovative best practice for invasive plant removal and will further the vision laid out by campus planners for ecological restoration and pedestrian improvements on UGA’s East Campus,” said Kevin Kirsche, UGA’s director of sustainability. Given the regenerative nature of privet, it could take several years before the unwanted vegetation is removed.last_img read more

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MFM Maintains Winning Streak in Final Six

first_imgOn Sunday, MFM upset Nigeria Customs 58-57 in the opening match of the Final Six to the surprise of the spectators who were expecting a blow out for the new entrants.It was a tension soaked encounter in which the Customs led for the better part of the duration but the MFM ladies took over when it mattered most to win with just one point margin. The victory was the third recorded by the team just a single point margin.Only yesterday, Coach Aderemi Adewunmi said he was proud of his players recording two wins in their first two games of the Final Six.“Nobody expected us to be in the Final Six and now that we are here the girls are getting getter and winning games. I simply urged them to go on and enjoy themselves but they were just determined to win.“I am so happy with their professionalism and discipline. This is good for the sport and we look forward to better tidings in the competition,” coach Aderemi said.MFM defeated First Deepwater in the crucial final match in Enugu to qualify for the final phase of the competition in Lagos.The Group Managing Director of Zenith Bank, Peter Amangbo, said the competition would get better every year“We are happy with the progress made so far and we are very optimistic that we will take women basketball to the next level in Nigeria because the signs are there that things can only get better at continental and global levels,” Amangbo said.The competition continues today and it ends on Thursday at the national Stadium in Surulere, Lagos.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram ZENITH BANK WOMEN’S B’BALL LEAGUEThe new entrant into the National Women Basketball League, the Mountain of Fire Basketball Club, on Monday completed a back-to-back victory in their first ever appearance in the final phase of the competition.In the abridged format which is n a home and away basis, the MFM ladies defeated Nigeria Customs in the reverse fixture 56-49 in the Final Six which started on Sunday at the Sports Hall of the National Stadium, Lagos.last_img read more

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Derby v QPR: Austin back, trio absent

first_imgCharlie Austin returns to the starting line-up for QPR at Derby, Yun Suk-Young makes his first appearance of the season and Jay Emmanuel-Thomas, Tjaronn Chery and Massimo Luongo are all absent.Austin, fit again after a recent injury, comes in for Emmanuel-Thomas up front.Yun, who has been overlooked at left-back in favour of Paul Konchesky, is deployed in a more advanced role, replacing Chery.Meanwhile, James Perch is restored, with Nedum Onuoha returning to centre-back because Clint Hill is out with a knee injury, and there is also a starting place for Alejandro Faurlin.Derby are without the suspended George Thorne and the injured Tom Ince.Derby: Carson, Christie, Forsyth, Keogh, Hendrick, Martin, Russell, Shackell, Johnson, Butterfield, Weimann.Subs: Grant, Bryson, Bent, Baird, Pearce, Hanson, Warnock.QPR: Green, Perch, Onuoha, Hall, Konchesky, Henry, Faurlin, Tozser, Yun, Phillips, Austin.Subs: Smithies, Angella, Fer, Hoilett, Doughty, Polter, Blackwood.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Education & Political News

first_imgWhat’s been happening in school boards about evolution and intelligent design?  Here are some recent stories about politicians, reporters and ordinary citizens:Kansas Grass Roots:  Candidates vying for school board seats in Liberal, Kansas squared off over the evolution issue: see Hutchinson News.Ohio Rematch:  Despite an earlier loss, Darwin critics in Ohio are hoping to bring up the issue for a vote again, reports CNS News.  The article editorializes that “Their goal is to force curriculum changes that would also allow discussion of the intelligent design theory,” when the wording of the proposed changes specifically denies this.McCain’s Open Mind:  Though an evolutionist himself, Senator John McCain thinks students ought to hear both sides in the debate over evolution, according to a piece in Evolution News that comments on a story reported in the New York Sun July 18.  The Sun said, “the senator mocked the idea that American young people were so delicate and impressionable that they needed to be sheltered from the concept” and compared it to cold-war efforts to shield students from learning about Marxism.White House Press:  President Bush’s press secretary Tony Snow entertained Wesley J. Smith of the Discovery Institute.  Smith was there to congratulate the president for vetoing the stem cell funding bill this week.Quilt Warfare:  In a bizarre piece of propaganda, Canadian quilt-making mom Barbara West ridiculed intelligent design on her (hopefully) intelligently-designed quilt.  According to Canmore Leader, West, whose quilt showed the earth on a pile of turtles (see humor page), won the National Award of Excellence for her design.  Casey Luskin of Discovery Institute had some smirks about this.Free Press:  Patrick Gavin, associate editorial page editor of the LA Examiner, gave lengthy coverage to Casey Luskin and John West about their post-Dover book Traipsing Into Evolution that critically analyzes Judge Jones’ ruling.WWJD:  Lita Cosner wrote for Creation Ministries International about how governments and secularists are fighting to make US schools Christ-free zones and are erring on the side of censorship.Conservative Backlash:  Not all pro-evolutionists are liberals.  A new group calls itself Conservatives Against Intelligent Design.  See also report on Science and Theology News.National Wahoo:  In the vein that everyone is someone elses’ weirdo, George Gilder of the Discovery Institute wrote a lengthy article supporting intelligent design for National Review, only to be trashed a week later by John Derbyshire on National Review.Evolutionary Faith:  Uncommon Descent found out that the National Center for Science Education is looking for a “Faith Project Director,”  This is odd, because the NCSE argues that evolution is built on science, and creation is based on faith.  The job duties include “developing materials pertaining to evolution and religion for print and web; representing NCSE to the faith community, in print and in person; serving as liaison between NCSE and professional theological societies and religious organizations; speaking to the press about issues involving evolution education and challenges to it; counseling teachers, administrators, parents, and others facing challenges to evolution education.” Thanks to Evolution News and Access Research Network for most of these leads.  Let’s get the ACLU to turn on the NCSE over separation of church and state.  Derbyshire is an arrogant hack who likens creationists to whack-a-moles.  This is a psychological disorder known as role reversal.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Faith, family and the future of Newcomer Century Farm

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field LeaderThe original mallet used to drive pegs into the posts when the old barn was built on the farm almost 150 years ago sits in a glass display case near Glen Newcomer’s desk. The cabinet in the corner of his office is made from the logs that were a part of the first log cabin on the farm originally homesteaded in 1866 by Nathaniel Newcomer, Glen’s great-great-grandfather.Six generations later, located just south of Bryan, Newcomer Farms is a cash grain operation that has diversified to include a seed dealership and crop insurance agency as a part of their business. The family does not need to look far to find history to help guide its future.Glen NewcomerNathaniel Newcomer was the second son born to Christian Newcomer, a minister who moved to Williams County from Lancaster, Pa. in 1840.“Nathaniel purchased the land, cleared the timber, and built a log cabin, and then the barn, and a little later a brick house,” Glen said. “The barn was built in 1872, and the brick house followed in 1874.”Following Nathaniel, the farm was owned by his son Harley Newcomer in the early 1900s. The next owner of the farm was Harley’s son Newell, Glen’s Grandpa, who was born in 1903. Newell then transitioned the farm to Glen’s dad, Lyman, who is now 85 and still visits the farm regularly.“My grandpa (Newell) was a very humble man. He was very conservative. He grew up and started farming during the Depression. His whole emphasis was to pass the farm to the next generation, and be able to do it without having debt. His focus was on passing the torch,” Glen said. “The same could be said about my father (Lyman). He had the same philosophy.”The family has been very proactive in generational transitions going back to his grandfather. In 1966, 100 years after the farm was originally purchased, upon taking the advice of their family attorney who happened to be a cousin to Newell, the farm became incorporated. N&L Farms, Inc. (Newell and Lyman) became a C-Corp.“The idea behind forming the corporation was to allow the farm ground to stay intact, unlike many farms in the area which had the ground divided among the heirs as a generation passed. In this way, the farm could grow and be passed on to the next generation,” Glen said.Fifty years after first becoming incorporated, the name changed to Newcomer Farms, and it became a S-Corp. Glen is now in the process of transferring ownership of some of the shares to his son Jason who is the 6th generation involved in the family operation.Like most Midwestern farms in the 1940s, the Newcomers raised a variety of crops and livestock. Framed and hanging on Glen’s office wall is a copy of the “1944 War Food Program Farm Plan for Ohio,” which farmers were required to complete. This form was put out by the War Food Administration, Agricultural Adjustment Agency. At that time, Newell raised soybeans, corn, wheat, hay and oats on 140 acres. They also had beef cattle, milk cows, chickens and hogs. Looking back at the old records, “1943 was the first year my Grandpa raised soybeans. That year the corn yielded 61 bushels per acre, and wheat yielded 30 bushels per acre,” Glen said. Those yields were not bad considering no commercial fertilizers, herbicides, fungicides, or insecticides were available back then and early hybrid corn varieties had only been developed a decade prior.Growing up, Glen remembers the farm being a more diversified livestock farm.“Land was hard to come by,” Glen said. “We had chickens and cattle and hogs. Growing up, I fed livestock all the time. I was always doing chores around the farm, and feeding animals after school. The thought of taking an animal to the fair just sounded like more work.”Glen fondly remembers his grandpa Newell loving to feed cattle.“He was a true cattleman at heart. Feeding cattle was what he did. Even his hobby was to feed cattle. He loved his Angus cattle,” Glen said.Livestock remained a part of the farming operation until the 1990s.“We still raised hogs throughout the 1980s when I returned to the farm,” Glen said.Though showing livestock at the fair was not his thing, Glen remembers being heavily involved in both 4-H and the FFA.“I would not be where I am today if it wasn’t for being in the FFA,” Glen said. “The FFA program in addition to being in 4-H have taught me leadership skills that I have used throughout my entire life.”He credits learning skills like parliamentary procedure as being invaluable in the leadership roles he has filled. Glen has served as past president of the Fairview Young Farmers, Bryan Rotary Club, and also Williams County Farm Bureau. He has also served as a trustee for the Bryan Area Foundation and Defiance College. He served on the Bryan City Schools Board of Education for 20 years, and is currently Vice Chair of the Redline Equipment Board of Directors. Glen credits his high school business teacher, Doug Rupp, for having the greatest influence on him from a business standpoint. Glen said his high school FFA advisor Ray Woodring was influential in his decision to go on to college.“He was the person that inspired me and encouraged me to go to Ohio State, ATI in Wooster,” Glen said. “While there I majored in livestock production, since we had livestock on the farm, and I was the assistant swine herdsman.”Glen said the focus of the farm changed after he returned from college in the 80s. Upon graduating from The Ohio State University, Agriculture Technical Institute (ATI) in Wooster, Glen worked in agriculture off the farm for a short time before coming back to take over the operations. As the profitability for each of those enterprises changed, Glen evaluated each one and decided to go in a different direction.“Up until this point, the diversity of different livestock and crop enterprises was the way that you made it financially,” Glen said. “Then we started growing seed beans for Pioneer. We have had a Pioneer agency for 36 years.”He became a Pioneer sales agent after he got out of college and became more interested in agronomy than livestock. In 2001 they became licensed crop insurance agents to further diversify.“We started in the 80s. My wife and I had to become diversified and find something profitable to get through that period of time. We still had hogs in the 80s, but in the early 90s we eliminated that enterprise to focus more on grain production, seed production and sales,” he said.Glen and his wife, Ann, have been married for 36 years. They have three children. Their youngest son, Jason returned from college four years ago and is a part of the operation. The Newcomers have steadily increased their acreage over the past 18 years. Glen hired his first full-time employee 10 years ago and now has four. All his employees have been with him for 9 to 10 years, and he credits much of the farm’s current success to the dedication and commitment of his team. When Jason returned to the operation four years ago, Glen did not take anything off of anyone’s responsibilities.“When Jason came back to the operation, we had him take on new projects and various items that I transitioned to him from a management standpoint,” Glen said.Jason is leading Newcomer Farms into the technological future.“Jason does all the spraying and soil sampling. He is in charge of all the record keeping for chemical and fertilizer applications. The technology he uses records this in real time. Jason does all the GPS soil sampling. We sample by management zones. Jason writes the prescriptions for variable rate fertilizer application, and variable rate seeding for our planters. The prescriptions are based on the soil test results and our yield goals. Jason also uses a drone for aerial scouting of the fields,” Glen said.Another part of the Newcomer Farm team Glen created six years ago was a business advisory board. “One of the best business decisions I made was developing a business advisory board,” Glen said. “I recognize the value of having professional people outside of our industry looking over my shoulder. The board is made up of a retired CEO, a retired CFO, a couple attorneys, a CPA, and few others. They meet three times a year with my wife and my son and I to discuss the issues facing our operation. We also invite our lenders in on occasion to see the expert advice and the recommendations we are getting so they better understand why we do what we do. A few of the board members are older than me, and a few are younger. The younger ones are the people who will still be around to assist our son Jason when he takes over. These professionals can look at our farming operation as a business and tell me what I should be focused on. I look to them for solid business advice.”When considering the rich past and bright future as the farm transitions to the sixth generation (and beyond), Newcomer points to Proverbs 22:1 that says: Choose a good reputation over great riches; being held in high esteem is better than silver or gold. “If there was anything my father drove into me, it was not to boast, not to brag, and to be humble. Dad always said if you are successful, you don’t need to tell anyone. They can see it,” Glen said. “Remember your heritage and recognize the traits and characteristics that represent our family and got us to where we are: honesty, integrity, loyalty, faith, and family.”last_img read more

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Never cache alone: Geocaching groups and organizations

first_imgFinding someone to go geocaching with can sometimes be difficult, especially when you are just starting out. Luckily there are many geocaching organizations and groups all around the world that connect geocachers to other local explorers. They strengthen the geocaching community, help beginners get into the game, and do so much more. Learn what you can expect and how you can find a geocaching group near you to join. SharePrint RelatedGeocaching Connections: Associations and ClubsDecember 23, 2013In “Maker Madness”Check out Geocaching.com’s new look!March 25, 2015In “Geocaching tools”New: An events calendar on your DashboardAugust 22, 2017In “News” They write geocaching blogs, release geocaching magazines, or allow geocachers to connect through online discussion forums. Find a local geocaching group The list is a work in progress. We expect to expand it to other countries and add groups and organizations that are active in their communities and are contributing to geocaching in positive ways. Reach out to us with the group you’d like to see included. Some have formed to foster positive relationships with local land management, forest rangers, and environmental agencies. They often work hand in hand to inform geocachers and the public how to interact with nature (aka geocaching spaces) in a respectful and non-invasive manner. What can I expect when joining a geocaching org? The sense of community geocaching organizations offer can be helpful for new geocachers and old pros alike. And they’re an easy way to make new geocaching friends. You can find a geocaching group in your area by visiting this list and map of geocaching groups and organizations. This list of orgs was “vetted” with input from community volunteers and Geocaching HQ staff. There are many organized geocaching groups worldwide. Many of them connect with members through Facebook groups or even have their own websites with activity calendars, discussion forums and information. How can I find a geocaching group near me? Geocaching organizations often host potlucks and meetups, set up friendly geocaching competitions, help new geocachers with questions, and keep everyone informed with local geocaching news. Share with your Friends:More A few orgs even organize camping trips or travel groups to embark on an adventure together – and of course geocache along the way.  If you are outside of the areas currently covered by our list and map, our regional forums offer a great way to find a local geocaching group or organization.last_img read more

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Netherlands top Sweden 1-0, to face US in Women’s WC final

first_imgPlaying in only their second Women’s World Cup, the Netherlands qualified for the final against three-time champion US with a 1-0 win over Sweden in extra time in the second semifinal.The reigning European champions were undefeated coming into the semifinal at Stade de Lyon, while Sweden lost 0-2 to the US in the group stage, reports Efe news.England and the US put on a terrific display of offense on Tuesday in the first semifinal, but the Swedish and Dutch sides opted for caution.As neither team had been expected to get this far, the emphasis on avoiding mistakes was understandable on Wednesday, though perhaps not much appreciated by the 48,000-plus in the stands hoping to see fireworks.Sweden managed two shots in the first half and the Dutch, despite enjoying 53 percent possession, produced only one chance. The stars — Vivianne Miedema for the Netherlands and the Scandinavian side’s Stina Blackstenius — were nearly invisible.The Dutch began the second half without their best player in the 2017 European Championship, Lieke Martens, who has been hampered by a foot injury.The match came alive for a few minutes about midway through the second half.Netherlands goalkeeper Sari van Veenendaal had to be sharp to divert a low strike from Nilla Fischer to the post in the 71st minute.On the following sequence, a Miedema header forced a heroic save from Swedish keeper Hedvig Lindahl, who subsequently turned aside a shot by Shanice van de Sanden.Finally, nine minutes into the first extra-time period, Jackie Groenen, who wears No. 14 jersey of Dutch legend Johan Cruyff, put the ball in the Swedish net with a textbook shot into the bottom corner.advertisementAlso Read | Peru crush Chile 3-0 to set up Copa America final against BrazilAlso Read | Copa America: Jesus, Firmino on target as Brazil crush Argentina to reach finalAlso Seelast_img read more

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