Philly’s Met Opera House Opening As A $56 Mil Concert Venue In December 2018

first_img[Video: The Met Philadelphia][H/T Philly.com] As reported at Philly.com, Philadelphia’s Metropolitan Opera House on North Broad Street will be converted into a new 3,500-capacity Live Nation concert venue, with plans for the site to open to the public as early as December of this year. To complete the massive renovation project, Live Nation entered into a partnership with well-known Philly real estate developer Eric Blumenfeld. As detailed in the article, the cost of the renovation is now projected at $56 million, which comes in over $10 million dollars more than the projected total cost of $45 million announced in May of last year.Notably, Bob Weir and other members of the Grateful Dead are investors in the project. This investment is not necessarily too surprising, given Weir’s and Live Nation head Geoff Gordon’s close relationship. In 2016, Weir officiated Gordon’s wedding to Sayeeda Gordon during a performance at The Tower Theater in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. As Live For Live Music has previously reported, the wedding took place during the set break of the show, which was a stop on Weir’s “Campfire Tour” promoting his solo album, Blue Mountain—in addition to the private nuptuals, the show itself saw sit-ins by Joe Russo and Tom Hamilton.The Metropolitan Opera House is a large 3,500-person venue that takes up a full city block at Broad and Poplar Streets. For the renovation, the main theater will be converted for seated and standing-only general-admission concerts; however, the opera house also contains a number of smaller rooms that could be converted into lounges and additional performances spaces. With the venue’s opening anticipated for the end of 2018, no acts have been announced for The Met’s opening. However, in addition to concerts and, likely, comedy shows, Holy Ghost Church, a partner and former full owner of the space, will host services at the venue after its reopening.As noted by Philly.com, in contrast to other mid-size concert venues around Philadelphia, The Met will be larger and “a good deal more posh” than venues like The Fillmore, Electric Factory, Academy of Music, and Tower, which house a capacity of around 2,500 people. The Met could also be a good fit for artists like Arcade Fire, Lorde, and Lana Del Ray who could easily sell out the renovated space and that have recently performed at a half-full Wells Fargo Center, which has a capacity of around 20,000 people.The Metropolitan Opera House was formerly a historic world-class opera house, which was built in 1908 by the well-known theater impresario Oscar Hammerstein I—also the grandfather of the famed musical librettist Oscar Hammerstein II of the critically acclaimed composing duo, Rodgers and Hammerstein. While the venue was used as an opera house through to 1934, the renovation will mark the next evolution of the building, which has formerly been used as a movie theater, ballroom, sports venue, and church.However, the renovation project will likely be a difficult one. The building was unused and vacant from 1988 to 1995, eventually being saved from demolition in 1996 by a different church group after the city declared the site was imminently dangerous. However, after Holy Ghost Headquarters Revival Center bought the church and spent $5 million dollars stabilizing the venue, the church group tapped Eric Blumenfeld for a development partnership and sold the building to him for $1. In 2015, the church filed a lawsuit against Blumenfeld for the lack of progress, though in 2017, the Holy Ghost Church and Blumenfeld reached a joint ownership agreement.As Blumenthal stated last year about the Metropolitan Opera House, “It’s a glorious old building that had been neglected that anyone with any intelligence would tell you to tear down.”With Holy Ghost Church, Blumenfeld, and Live Nation all on board and full steam ahead, the crew is hopeful that the renovation will be completed by December 2018, though already the expected renovation date has been pushed back from September 2018. You can watch the promo video for Live Nation’s new, renovated concert venue at The Met in Philadephia below.last_img read more

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Office of Global Programs

first_imgUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students and faculty gathered Monday to celebrate their commitment to international cooperation and scholarship and to discuss current issues in food security.This was the college’s eighth annual International Agriculture Day Lecture and Reception. The event has become a time to reflect on the international nature of agriculture and the importance of agricultural development in building a safer, healthier world.“Perhaps the single greatest challenge that these students will face is feeding a global population that is expected to exceed 9 billion people in a relatively short period of time,” said CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue. “We need to do this while maintaining and conserving our natural resources. We aim to provide them with the very best education and opportunities to prepare them to meet that challenge and conquer it.“Today we focus our attention on one of the major hurdles: understanding other cultures and how we need to work together to build a more food-secure world.”The gender gap is a culturally based agricultural challenge that must be overcome, said keynote speaker Helga Recke, a Visiting Fellow in Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ Advancing Women in Agriculture through Research and Education (AWARE) program.Feeding the world’s growing population will only be possible if all farmers, including the nearly 50 percent of farmers who are women, are empowered to produce their best crops.Lack of credit, lack of education and cultural subordination keep female farmers around the world producing about 20 to 30 percent less than their male counterparts. This disparity must be overcome to provide worldwide food security.Recke has spent her career on the forefront of global agricultural development, studying the ways that gender impacts agricultural development and supporting education and professional development for female agricultural scientists across the developing world.In her lecture, “Efforts to Narrow the Gender Gap in Agriculture: One Woman’s Journey,” Recke discussed how traditional and transitional gender roles affect agricultural development and scientific progress in the developing world.“Gender in agriculture is not just a hobby horse,” Recke said. “It has real consequences if you pay attention.”Agricultural development efforts that ignore the way women use agricultural technologies or the division of labor between women and men on farms are bound to fail.As part of the effort to create agricultural technologies responsive to the needs of both female and male farmers, Recke has spent two decades supporting leadership roles for female scientists and extension specialists in developing countries and around the world.Having a more diverse group of scientists who are developing technologies will lead to a more diverse set of solutions for farmers, she said. These are the types of solutions that students and faculty members gathered at Monday’s event will develop in the coming century.The CAES Office of Global Programs, which hosts the International Agriculture Day Lecture and Reception each spring, honored some of the college’s most globally minded students with travel grants, scholarships and awards at the event. Students who will graduate this year with the college’s International Agriculture Certificate were also recognized.Kirsten Allen, a senior pursuing a bachelor’s degree in pharmaceutical sciences and a minor in plant biology and a certificate recipient, told the crowd how her internship in Piacenza, Italy, broadened her worldview and inspired her to work internationally.Other students received the certificate:Jeffrey Bowden, bachelor’s degree in applied biotechnology and an internship in Beauvais and Frausseilles, FranceNicole Encardes, bachelor’s degree in horticulture and an internship in Pamplona, SpainLori Hanna, bachelor’s degree in environmental health, master’s degree in public health and an internship in Havana, CubaAlexandria Talley, bachelor’s degree in avian biology and an internship in Khon Kaen, ThailandElizabeth Umanah, bachelor’s degree in applied biotechnology and an internship in Thiès, SenegalInternational Agriculture Certificate students expand their global perspectives by participating in internationally focused coursework, language study and a hands-on international internship aligned with their academic and career goals.Students who earned other internationally focused awards were recognized:Graduate International Travel Awards These awards will fund an international activity that supports each student’s interest in international collaboration and global issues. The award covers round-trip airfare to an international conference or research site.Cristiano Bortoluzzi, doctoral candidate in poultry scienceJune Brawner, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciences and doctoral student in anthropologyFernanda Castro, doctoral student in poultry scienceKelsey Coffman, doctoral candidate in entomologyCarson Dann, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciencesZhongyuan Liu, doctoral student agricultural and applied economicsJeffrey Standish, doctoral candidate in plant pathologyAna Villegas-Gamble, doctoral student in poultry scienceKanemasu Global Engagement AwardThis award recognizes a student who goes above and beyond in internationalizing his/her academic program at UGA.Elizabeth Umanah, bachelor’s degree in applied biotechnologyBroder-Ackermann Global Citizen AwardThis award recognizes a CAES undergraduate student who has embraced global citizenship through participation, promotion and leadership of international initiatives during his/her collegiate career.Stacie Evans, bachelor’s degree student in biological scienceGlobal Food Security International Travel ScholarshipHiram Larew, adjunct professor in the CAES Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication and a 1975 CAES horticulture graduate, has worked his whole career to end food insecurity around the world.This year he established the Global Food Security International Travel Scholarship to support CAES undergraduate or graduate students who participate in an international education activity focused on the global community and food insecurity.Grant Freeman, bachelor’s degree student in biological scienceTerence J. Centner International Scholarship CAES Professor Terence Centner has studied the intersection of environmental policies and outcomes in agricultural and natural resource conservation settings for 30 years. This year, as part of his commitment to international scholarship and education, he established the Terence J. Centner International Scholarship.The scholarship will support a CAES undergraduate student who participates in a semesterlong exchange program at a UGA partner university in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe or South America.Mallory Warren, bachelor’s degree student in environmental economicsWen Williams International Travel Scholarship Over the three decades he spent in Conner Hall, Wen Williams, retired CAES professor of agricultural and applied economics and associate dean and director for academic affairs, impacted the lives of thousands of students.This year, in support of his mission to broaden the horizons of CAES students, he established the Wen Williams International Travel Endowment Fund, which supports a CAES undergraduate student participating in one of the college’s study abroad, international internship or exchange programs.Kendall Sewell, bachelor’s degree student in environmental economics and managementAgriculture Abroad Photo ContestThe Agriculture Abroad Photo Contest is open to all CAES students. The contest encourages them to share images of agriculture from around the world.First place went to Ellen Hardin for the photo, “Unconventional Diet.”Second place went to Chandler Mulvaney for the photo, “Dancing for Farmers.”Third place went to Zane Tacket for the photo, “Victor.”To see photos from the event, including contest entries, visit www.tinyurl.com/internationalag2018.For more information about the Office of Global Programs, visit www.global.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Alpena Power Company Warns Customers of Scam

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisAnother scam appears to be sweeping through the area this time it’s dealing with your power. Alpena Power Company said residents have been receiving a number of phone calls from someone acting as an employee.The power company claims the fake employee who goes by the name of Anthony Mills is calling residents to collect their unpaid utility bill over the phone threatening to shut off their power if payment is not received.Alpena Power Company warns customers if they see a 1 800 number appear on their caller I.D. hang up. The company claims they never make phone calls to collect payment over the phone and personal information should never be handed out.The utility company encourages customers to contact them at 989–358–4900, or visit their office if they have any questions concerning their bill. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious MSP Currently Hiring! Make Your Move in Law EnforcementNext Anti-human trafficking weekend events cancelledlast_img read more

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