Slowly and cautiously, some Episcopal churches in Europe start to…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Egan MillardPosted May 8, 2020 Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Parishioners of the Church of St. Augustine of Canterbury in Wiesbaden, Germany, disinfect the pews on May 8. Photo: Christopher Easthill[Episcopal News Service] As the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged Europe in early March, the Episcopal parishes there were some of the first in The Episcopal Church to close. Now, some congregations of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe are resuming in-person worship.Of the seven countries in which the convocation has a presence, Germany is the furthest along in the process of reopening churches – apart from the Republic of Georgia, which did not order churches to close, though many have done so anyway. In Italy, which suffered some of the worst (and earliest) devastation from the pandemic, churches will be allowed to hold worship services again starting May 18, while other countries like France and Switzerland are expected to keep them closed into June.Germany has begun allowing churches to reopen over the past week with various restrictions by region, including limits on the number of people who can be in the building at once and the kinds of worship activities that can happen. The convocation has more churches in Germany than any other country: three of its nine parishes and four of its 12 missions are there. At least one of the German churches will resume in-person worship on May 10: the Church of St. Augustine of Canterbury in Wiesbaden, according to the Rt. Rev. Mark Edington, bishop of the convocation.Edington has been stuck in Massachusetts since March, unable to return to Europe because of travel restrictions, but he told Episcopal News Service that the clarity of stringent government orders in Europe has prevented the confusion and mixed messaging many American bishops are dealing with.“My role has, in many ways, been a much easier one than bishops in the United States because, in our context, the choice is not left to me or to leaders of churches as to whether or not a house of worship may remain open or must remain closed. We [were] simply closed by state order,” Edington said.“So I’m very aware that my colleagues in the House of Bishops who are responsible for making the decisions in places where governors and mayors have been kind of all over the map – they have a really tough decision to make and they often have to just make [it] on their own, and I am not in that position.”Edington’s office developed a set of guidelines and a questionnaire that churches in countries that are relaxing restrictions must complete before he allows them to reopen. In addition to observing all local requirements, Edington has issued church-specific directions, for example, the passing of the peace is to be done without physical contact, and all coffee hours and other fellowship events must remain virtual. The Eucharist may be celebrated, but only the bread may be shared, and those distributing it must sanitize their hands immediately before doing so.The convocation has shared its guidelines with the Church of England’s Diocese in Europe, which operates Anglican churches in some of the same cities and has adapted the guidelines for its own churches. Some of its German churches are also reopening on May 10, while its churches in England are still weeks away from doing so. The United Kingdom now leads Europe in recorded COVID-19 deaths, surpassing Italy.Edington is leaving other issues – like the practicality of using masks during services and questions about singing, which has been restricted in some cases because of concerns over increased transmission of the virus – to church leaders to decide in accordance with their local laws.The Church of St. Augustine of Canterbury in Wiesbaden, Germany, plans to open its doors again on May 10. Photo courtesy of the churchSt. Augustine’s in Wiesbaden, a city just west of Frankfurt, hasn’t held in-person services since March 8. When it reopens on May 10, ushers will seat parishioners at least 5 feet apart, in keeping with local rules. Normally, about 110 people come to a Sunday service at St. Augustine’s, but with the distancing requirements, only about 50 will be able to fit in the church. The Rev. Christopher Easthill, the rector, initially considered adding a Saturday evening service to accommodate everyone, but after surveying his parishioners, he found that only about 50 plan to attend in person on May 10. Many are staying home for now, including those at high risk. Easthill knows of two congregants who have had COVID-19; both have recovered. Members of the U.S. military stationed nearby, whose activities are still strictly regulated, may not return for a while either.Anyone who wants to attend in person will be asked to wear a mask and sanitize their hands upon entering the building. There will be no handshakes and no passing of the collection plate, and single-use service programs will be used instead of prayer books. The Eucharist will be celebrated with ushers directing people to come up and receive the bread one by one. There will be singing, but not by the congregation or a full choir; a few singers in the choir loft will accompany the organist.The Rev. Christopher Easthill (right) and parishioners of the Church of St. Augustine of Canterbury clean the church in preparation for in-person worship. Photo: Christopher Easthill“I’m excited to be back,” Easthill told ENS. “The Zoom services we’ve done have been nice because I have seen the people but, nevertheless, only the little ‘Brady Bunch’ boxes on the screen.”St. Augustine’s virtual gatherings have evolved from a bare-bones recording of Morning Prayer to include weekday services, Bible studies, coffee hours and trivia nights. Those have provided vital social connections for parishioners, and Easthill stressed that virtual programming will continue so that those who can’t come back yet – and those who might never come back – don’t feel left out.“What we ought to do is make sure that we include these people – our normal congregation who can’t come. The second group we want to include … is all the other people who’ve popped up and started watching our online services, those ex-members who’ve moved back to the States, back to the U.K., and have enjoyed watching it, and people who haven’t been members before but have found us,” Easthill said. “So we’re going to have a hybrid service. What we do on Sunday will also be broadcast live.”The Church of St. Boniface in Augsburg – near Munich in southern Germany – is tentatively planning to reopen on May 10, although what that might look like remains uncertain. The congregation, which meets in a Lutheran church, is small but dedicated, said the vicar, the Rev. Lutz Ackermann.About 15 people would come on a typical Sunday “during normal times – if you can remember, there once were normal times! It seems so far away,” he told ENS.The Church of St. Boniface meets in a Lutheran church’s building. Photo courtesy of the churchAckermann is “trying to meander through this labyrinth” of regulations, developing a plan that will abide by convocation guidelines, government restrictions and the policies of the host church. The church has been approved by Edington to resume in-person worship, but “we still need to think about it and work through the question [of] what works for us, in practical terms, in liturgical terms, in terms of the community.”“To me, it’s not entirely clear that this will mean that we come back to something that feels very normal very soon. I would doubt it, actually.”For now, Ackermann will not celebrate the Eucharist and there will be no singing. Like Easthill, he is committed to continuing virtual worship regardless of reopening the church – partly because he has so few congregants that he isn’t sure any of them will be willing or able to return to church at the moment. Holding services on Zoom has been “actually quite a nice way [to gather] because it helps to make the service rather interactive with such a small group of people,” Ackermann said. “It feels very intimate.”While Ackermann and Easthill are under no illusions of a return to normalcy anytime soon, they look forward to simply being able to share the same space with their parishioners.“It’s very strange when you’re preaching just into a microphone, into an empty building,” Easthill said. “So I’m excited and looking forward to having some people back there in church with us again.”– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release COVID-19 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Slowly and cautiously, some Episcopal churches in Europe start to reopen Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

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Opal ‘Vera’ Locke, 91, Wellington: July 8, 1924 – Sept. 8, 2015

first_imgOpal Vera LockeOpal “Vera” Locke, 91, of Wellington, died Tuesday morning, September 8, 2015 at St. Francis Hospital in Wichita.Opal “Vera” (Gardner) Locke was born on July 8, 1924 in Nevada, MO to Harry H. Gardner and Loretta Elizabeth Henry.On September 21, 1941 she married Joseph M. Locke in Springfield, MO.  They celebrated 66 years of marriage before his passing on November 25, 2007.Joe and Vera owned and operated Lockes Men and Boys Wear for almost 40 years.She is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Joseph; three sisters and son in law, Chuck Langford.Survivors include; three daughters, Karen S. Lawless and her husband Don of Kansas City, MO, Saundra Hutchison and her husband Charles and Donna Langford all of Wellington, KS; eight grandchildren; 20 great grandchildren; and four great great grandchildren.Funeral Services will be held at Frank Funeral Home on Saturday, September 12, 2015 at 10:00 A.M.  Mr. Dennis Branson will officiate. Private Interment will follow the service at Prairie Lawn Cemetery in Wellington, KS.Visitation will be held at the funeral home on Friday, September 11, 2015 from 1 to 7 p.m.Frank Funeral Home has been entrusted with the arrangements.To leave condolences or sign our guest book, please visit our website at www.frankfuneralhome.net.last_img read more

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NAFTA renegotiation settled upon instead of withdrawal

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Trump administration decided to pursue renegotiation over withdrawal from the North American Free Trade Agreement.“There are compelling reasons to update and reform NAFTA from agriculture’s perspective, including improvements on biotechnology, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, and geographic indicators. As you know, overall, NAFTA has been overwhelmingly beneficial for farmers, ranchers and associated businesses all across the United States, Canada and Mexico for decades. Walking away from those gains would have been a severe blow to the agricultural sector and we appreciate the path that will allow for reform and enhancement, rather than abandonment of past achievements,” said Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president in a letter to President Trump. “The NAFTA modernization effort should recognize and build upon the strong gains achieved by U.S. agriculture through tariff elimination, harmonization — or recognition of equivalency — of numerous regulatory issues, and development of integrated supply chains that have arisen due to the agreement. With NAFTA, U.S. farmers and ranchers across the nation have benefited from an increase in annual exports to Mexico and Canada, which have gone from $8.9 billion in 1993 to $38 billion in 2016. We strongly caution against any actions that would lead to a re-imposition of tariffs or other barriers to agricultural trade with our NAFTA partners.”last_img read more

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Playoff hopes dimming as Timberwolves lose Rose, Covington, Teague for season

first_imgTrump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event Rose, the 2011 NBA Most Valuable Player, and Teague missed Minnesota’s past four games, Rose with a sore right elbow and Teague after re-aggravating a left foot injury first nagging him in December. Both will be free agents in July.An MRI of Rose’s elbow showed a chip fracture and treatment is being considered while Teague was given an anti-inflammation medication and will wear a boot before being reevaluated after the season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsCovington, under contract until mid-2022, has been out for 34 games with a right knee bone bruise.Covington averaged 14.5 points, 5.7 rebounds and 2.3 steals this season for the T-Wolves while Rose averaged 18.0 points, 2.7 rebounds and 4.3 assists and Teague contributed 12.1 points, 2.5 rebounds and 8.2 assists. MOST READ Miguel Romero Polo: Bamboo technology like no other Staying the course Karl-Anthony Towns has led Minnesota this season, averaging 24.6 points and 12.3 rebounds.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Google Philippines names new country director Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose smiles at fans during a timeout in the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Denver Nuggets, Tuesday, March 12, 2019, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)Minnesota Timberwolves’ slim NBA playoffs hopes suffered a major setback Thursday with the announcement that guards Derrick Rose and Jeff Teague and forward Robert Covington were ruled out for the rest of the season.The T-Wolves are 32-39 after dropping seven of their past 10 games and would need to win at least 10 of their final 11 to reach the post-season.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag View comments LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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LINEBREAK Special Offer

first_imgRelated Fileslinebreak_edm_v6-pdfRelated LinksLINEBREAK Offer NRL Touch Football’s official compression partner, LINEBREAK, is pleased to announce that the Touch Football Australia range of product is available online now. To view the product range, please click on the following link – http://www.linebreak.com.au/TFA-Compression-Range-s/1839.htm. Enter your unique code TFA25 at the cart to apply your TFA member pricing discount.Benefits of LINEBREAK Compression;·         Graduated compression increases blood circulation and allows muscle recovery post exercise·         Moisture management·         Antibacterial properties·         UPF50+ Sun protection·         Flatlock seams to reduce chafing for greater comfort·         Knitted waistband for ultimate support and comfortStay tuned to the TFA website for more great deals from LINEBREAK. last_img read more

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Sir Steve Redgrave And Freddie Flintoff Clash For Sport Relief

first_imgSir Steve Redgrave and Andrew ‘Freddie’ Flintoff MBE are set to go head to head in a Clash of the Titans for Sport Relief.Redgrave vs Flintoff in Clash of the TitansFive-time Olympic champion rower Sir Steve and cricket legend and broadcaster Freddie will each captain a team of celebrities as they go head to head in a number of Olympic sporting challenges as part of the Sport Relief Night of TV on Friday 18th March.Sir Steve says “Winning gold medals at the Olympic Games was one thing, leading my team to victory in Clash of the Titans is another matter altogether,” he said. “Freddie Flintoff, bring it on.”England all-rounder Freddie played a major role in the 2005 home Ashes victory over Australia and is no stranger to captaincy having led the England team during his international career. Freddie also captains a team on the sports-based comedy panel show A League Of Their Own.“I took part in Clash of the Titans last time but we were robbed under John Bishop’s leadership,” he said. “This time I’m back and I’m not leaving without that trophy.”The teams will be made up of famous faces from the worlds of entertainment and sport. With the Clash of the Titans trophy up for grabs, the celebrities will be put through their paces as they compete in a number of Olympic sporting challenges: Track Cycling, Rhythmic Gymnastics, Synchronised Swimming and, for the first time, Wrestling, plus a Triathlon race.Clash of the Titans became a Sport Relief fixture in 2014 when Lord Sebastian Coe and his team of celebrities narrowly beat a team led by comedian John Bishop.On the night, sports TV presenters Ore Oduba and Dan Walker will host all the action live from the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London.It promises to be a night filled with tension, entertainment and sporting rivalry and the public has the opportunity to buy tickets to watch all the action from the two venues; the Velodrome at Lee Valley VeloPark and the London Aquatics Centre.Money raised this Sport Relief will be used to make a difference to people living incredibly tough lives, here at home in the UK and across the world’s poorest communities.To buy tickets for Clash of the Titans go to www.seetickets.com/tour/sport-relief-2016/. Tickets cost £16, plus booking fees and £2.50 from the sale of each ticket will go directly to Sport Relief.last_img read more

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Kinder Morgan CEO says recent events confirm Trans Mountain may be untenable

first_imgPrime Minister Justin Trudeau flew back to Ottawa last Sunday to meet with both premiers to try solve the impasse, but the meeting ended with no clear resolution.Trudeau said after the meeting that the federal government was prepared to financially back the pipeline, and he had directed Finance Minister Bill Morneau to sit down with the company to discuss the matter.Kean confirmed on the call that discussions have begun, but said he was not going to make any details public until a definitive agreement has been reached or the discussions have ended.(THE CANADIAN PRESS) CALGARY, A.B. – The CEO of Kinder Morgan says events in recent days have reinforced his concerns about the viability of the Trans Mountain expansion project.Speaking on an earnings conference call, Steve Kean said the company suspended work on the project earlier this month because the investment may be “untenable for a private party to undertake,” and that events in recent days have “confirmed” those views.The political wrangling around the project has significantly escalated since Kinder Morgan halted work, with Alberta Premier Rachel Notley pushing to restrict oil shipments to British Columbia while B.C. Premier John Horgan stands firm in his opposition to the project.last_img read more

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Gucci owner Kering fined 17 bn for dodging taxes

first_imgRome: The owner of Italian fashion giant Gucci is set to pay a record fine of nearly 1.5 billion euros ($1.7 billion) in a tax evasion case, according to media reports Friday. “Lawyers are still negotiating with the tax authorities over a few hundred million euros, but the fine that the (French luxury) Kering group is about to pay is the highest (in Italy),” the La Stampa newspaper said. “It’s a cheque for nearly 1.5 billion euros,” it added. It follows a probe by Milan’s public prosecutor into the fashion house on suspicion of declaring several years worth of Italian sales in Switzerland, thereby saving around 1.3 billion euros in domestic tax. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalKering is expected to sign an agreement on the amount due on May 2, according to the financial newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore. “At this stage, no agreement has been reached on any specific amount,” the French group said. Earlier this year, Kering said it faced a claim for 1.4 billion euros in unpaid Italian taxes, adding it contested the preliminary findings. The group has consistently denied avoiding tax, saying its activities were fully compliant with all tax obligations. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostThe company’s Swiss-based Luxury Goods International (LGI) subsidiary has been under investigation for allegedly avoiding tax on earnings generated elsewhere. Most of the allegations centre on Gucci, whose offices in Milan and Florence were raided by Italian police in late 2017. In November, Milan prosecutors wrapped up their probe into alleged tax evasion of more than 1 billion euros by Gucci for revenues booked in the years between 2010 and 2016. The prosecutors say that revenues booked through LGI should be taxed in Italy and not in Switzerland. By agreeing to a settlement, Kering would be spared from having to pay interest and sanctions for late tax payments, which one source said would have added around 500 million euros to the final bill. Gucci’s Chief Executive Marco Bizzarri and former CEO Patrizio Di Marco are under investigation in the case. That investigation is expected to conclude with a separate settlement once the agreement on the tax dispute has been signed, one of the sources added. Lawyers for Bizzarri and Di Marco declined to comment.last_img read more

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