Grateful Dead TV News Special Featuring John Mayer, Warren Haynes, And More To Air Tonight

first_imgTime to set those DVRs: Tonight, June 22nd, at 10:30pm ET, Fox-5 New York news will air a very special segment Long Live The Grateful Dead! about the iconic band, the cultural phenomenon it became at its peak, and the resurrection the music has experienced in the wake of their 50th anniversary in 2015.The news package will feature interviews with artists who are keeping the Dead alive in 2017 in various ways, from latter-day incarnations of the original band (John Mayer; Warren Haynes), to stellar tribute acts (Tom Hamilton of Joe Russo’s Almost Dead), to new interpretations of the Dead’s classic catalogue (solo pianist Holly Bowling). The segment will also interview prominent fans and historians like former band publicist and biographer Dennis McNally, reality TV magnate and gay community icon Andy Cohen, and Sirius XM Dead radio host Gary Lambert, as well as a large selection of Deadheads from all walks of life.The half-hour segment will only be aired on TV and will not be available online after the fact, so make sure to set a recording or tune in tomorrow at 10:30PM EST to hear Fox-5 New York educate the masses on the modern Dead renaissance!last_img read more

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An unanticipated juxtaposition

first_img Seeing beauty in the mundane Artist Willie Cole uses everyday objects like ironing boards to ‘reveal the spirit’ within When the Harvard Art Museums reopened in 2014 after an extensive renovation, its new design enabled curators to display art in novel ways, creating dynamic connections between the approximately 250,000 works in the collection.That connective impulse informs a new pairing on a second-floor wall overlooking the museums’ courtyard, where the work of contemporary artist Kerry James Marshall was recently installed alongside that of 17th-century Flemish painter Nicolas Régnier.Marshall’s untitled work from 2008 and Régnier’s “Self-Portrait with an Easel,” completed circa 1620, both depict an artist, palette in hand, gazing out at the viewer. But the differences in scale, tone, style, time period, and use of color render each painting a striking counterpoint to the other. “This combination really sets up a whole series of questions for visitors,” said Mary Schneider Enriquez, Houghton Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, who was part of the museum team responsible for selecting the works.“The context is so different,” she said. “The role of that artist, how well we know him and what his painting was about, I think, begins to become a little more enigmatic than when it is hung by paintings from a similar period. Setting up that kind of dialogue opens up a discussion about so many things.”,For Enriquez, hanging the work of Marshall, whose art is profoundly influenced by urban culture, the African American experience, and the Civil Rights Movement, beside that of Régnier, a Caravaggesque Baroque painter whose subjects include saints and figures from classical mythology, is a provocative move. It challenges viewers to think more deeply about past and present notions of the art form and the history of portraiture, she said, and reconsider long-held notions of “who the artist is, what the artist looks like, and what he or she is trying to convey.”In Marshall’s piece, a black painter stares out from the canvas. Though his palette is brightly colored, his brush is dipped in the black paint located directly at the center of the work. The reference is unmistakable. The painting was inspired by a 1926 essay by Langston Hughes in which the author and poet wrote about the emergence of the black artist who was unafraid to fully embrace black culture in his or her work and abandon the “white is best” aesthetic.,Ensuring that the art on its walls speaks to all audiences is paramount to the Harvard Art Museums.“A priority of ours is to try to change the dynamic of the past so our students and our visitors [from] all worlds can see the greats of the history of art then and now, and can think about the historical collections at many art museums from the perspective of who is represented and who is not,” said Enriquez.“We felt it was important to give the Marshall painting real prominence both because of its visual power and because of the way that Marshall wants to challenge the story,” said Ethan Lasser, the Theodore E. Stebbins, Jr., Curator of American Art, who also helped with the selection. “I think it’s the power of challenging chronology and the power of a living artist who is not just looking to the past to get inspiration — he’s looking to the past as a place to challenge, as a place to insert himself.”,Challenging assumptions has been central to Marshall’s practice.“What I want to happen when I go to a museum is that expectations of what you find in there are completely altered,” he told a Harvard crowd during a campus talk in 2012, “so that it’s not commonplace to just see European paintings with European bodies, but it’s also as likely that you will see … black figures, Asian figures, or Hispanic figures.”Similar in conception to Marshall’s work, Régnier’s self-portrait depicts the artist but also includes the subject he is painting. The picture represents a kind of turning point in which the artist “is showing himself at work, and thinking about the magic of painting. He wants us to see how good he is,” said Lasser.The Baroque artist was also playing with perspective. Régnier appears to be looking at the person he is painting, which puts the viewer in the position of both observer and sitter. “That’s part of the magic of that painting that speaks across centuries,” said Lasser.And, like Marshall’s piece, he continued, it’s “a painting always in the making.” Relatedcenter_img At Art Museums, a new Kara Walker work Massive drawing and collage by the contemporary artist explores slavery’s history and ongoing legacylast_img read more

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Wolf Hall & Bring Up The Bodies to Transfer to West End

first_img Poulton’s RSC credits include The Canterbury Tales Parts I and II, St Erkenwald and Gregory Doran’s Morte d’Arthur. View Comments The stage adaptations of Hilary Mantel’s award-winning and best-selling novels Wolf Hall and its sequel Bring Up The Bodies are set to transfer to London’s West End. Penned by Mike Poulton and directed by Jeremy Herrin, the critically acclaimed Royal Shakespeare Company productions will play in repertory May 1 through September 6 at London’s Aldwych Theatre. Opening day perfomances are scheduled for May 17. The plays chronicle the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell from blacksmith’s boy to Henry VIII’s right-hand-man and are currently running at the Swan Theatre through March 29. Many of the RSC company will transfer to the West End including Ben Miles as Cromwell, Nathaniel Parker as Henry VIII, Lydia Leonard as Anne Boleyn, Paul Jesson as Cardinal Wolsey and Lucy Briers as Katherine of Aragon.  Both shows are designed by Christopher Oram. The lighting for Wolf Hall is designed by Paule Constable and Bring Up The Bodies by David Plater. Sound design is by Nick Powell, movement is by Siân Williams and music is composed by Stephen Warbeck.last_img read more

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5 Fall Hikes in the Blue Ridge

first_imgThe Blue Ridge region is nationally renowned for its leaf peeping potential, but picking the right trail for viewing fall colors can be a daunting task. Use this guide to find five of the best leaf viewing locations in the southern Appalachians before you hit the trails this fall.Looking Glass Rock, Pisgah National ForestNorth CarolinaThis is an iconic hike in Pisgah National Forest. From a  distance, Looking Glass is one of the most impressive mountains in the Southeast, but even more stunning is the view from its summit. The strenuous 6.4-mile out-and-back that guides forest visitors to the top of of the mountain, where the they find a sprawling view of the Western North Carolina mountains. 2016 is projected to be a banner year for leaf viewing in Western North Carolina, so plan to hit the trail soon.Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 12.03.21 PMAuxier Ridge Loop, Red River Gorge Kentucky Some of the best vistas in the Red River Gorge await on the Auxier Ridge Loop trail. This moderate day hike requires about five miles of foot travel and anywhere from three to six hours depending on your skill level. At the top you’ll find a stellar view of  Courthouse Rock and sprawling vistas of Kentucky’s Red River Gorge. Learn more here.Old Rag, Shenandoah National Park Virginia One of the most popular hikes in the Mid-Atlantic region, Old Rag offers fall visitors a prime vantage point from which to witness the changing of the seasons. In fact, it’s widely regarded as one of the best summits views in Virginia, particularly in autumn. The hike itself is strenuous, requiring a rock scramble and approximately 3.5 miles of trekking with many viewpoints along the way. But the real pay off is at the top! Learn more here.screen-shot-2015-10-28-at-2-17-23-pmBlackwater CanyonWest VirginiaSituated in the Monongahela National Forest in the north central West Virginia Highlands, Blackwater Canyon stands apart as one of the Mountain State’s best fall view points. Once used to haul lumber and coal through this sunning natural landscape, the Blackwater Canyon Trail is tailor-made for those seeking a sense if mountain solitude. In addition to transitioning leaves, be on the lookout for the endangered West Virginia flying squirrel, the Indiana bat, and the Cheat Mountain salamander. More on Blackwater Canyon here.Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 12.15.20 PMTable Rock Mountain, Linville Gorge North CarolinaThe Linville Gorge is arguably one of the most stunning landscapes in all of Western North Carolina, and it’s chock full of top-notch leaf peeping destinations. If you’ve never been, use the summit of Table Rock Mountain as an intro to all the gorge has to offer. The unique summit can be seen throughout much of the North Carolina High Country, and the route to the top is a breeze compared to some of the other summits on this list. Learn more here.Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 1.50.29 PMlast_img read more

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2018 marketing trends: Three “Ls”

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr I recently had the opportunity to appear on CU Broadcast with Mike Lawson to discuss 2018 marketing trends. During that show, we talked about what top issues are effecting credit unions as they prepare for the upcoming year with their marketing efforts.We specifically talked about the three “Ls”Live your brand through emotional connections—We are in a commodity business and the only way to not be a commodity is to connect with consumers. We have to shift from being transaction based (or even service based) to being advice based. In other words, your people can’t be order takers. Financial institutions even think service is great and is a differentiator. It’s not. The reality is advice is much deeper.Look at your marketing through a marketing audit—If you don’t change your marketing in 2018 you risk becoming irrelevant. You must look at your marketing from an outsider’s or consumer’s view. And one of the best ways to gain that perspective is through a marketing audit. In fact, more and more credit unions and banks are conducting marketing audits because they are seeing immediate strategic and tactical benefits. continue reading »last_img read more

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Poll: In which direction do you want Špancirfest to develop?

first_imgVaraždin’s Špancirfest, which began its story 20 years ago as the first street festival in Croatia and has grown into one of the most visited national festival events over the years, will experience its jubilee, 20th edition this year.The idea of ​​Špancirfest is to provide content that will arouse in each visitor during the ten days of the festival a sense of belonging to a community that nurtures creative thinking and freedom of expression.With this goal, the Tourist Board of Varaždin invites the citizens of Varaždin to fill out a survey with the aim of identifying the advantages and disadvantages and detecting the directions of future development of Špancirfest. ” The opinion of the citizens is very important to us, so we invite everyone to fill out the survey questionnaire and express their opinion, praise, criticism and suggestions related to the Varaždin festival”They point out from the Varaždin Tourist Board and add that citizens can send their loud thoughts until February 28, 2018.Two heads are always smarter than one, so here is an opportunity, except on Facebook, to get actively involved with argumentative praise, criticism and ideas for the future development of Špancirfest, all with the aim of constructive discussion and quality development. Certainly praise for the Varaždin Tourist Board for its open communication, because after all, if the local population does not identify and if it is not included directly or indirectly in the festival and the whole story, then everything makes no sense.It is precisely open communication and constructive discussions that are chronically lacking in our society as a whole, and thus in our tourism, because only in this way can we grow and develop as individuals and as a society.You can fill out the survey herelast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces Aid for Survivors of Severe Storms in Southwest Pennsylvania

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter March 27, 2018 Governor Wolf Announces Aid for Survivors of Severe Storms in Southwest Pennsylvaniacenter_img Press Release,  Weather Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced that the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) approved his request to declare a disaster in Fayette County after significant wind, flood and in some cases, mudslide damage to homes and businesses from severe storms and a tornado in February.“These storms damaged property and disrupted lives,” said Governor Wolf. “Low-interest loans will go a long way in helping those affected by the storms.”Homeowners, renters and businesses impacted by the Feb. 15-17 storms in Fayette County, as well as neighboring counties Greene, Somerset, Washington and Westmoreland may be eligible for low-interest disaster loans through the SBA Disaster Loan Programs.Low-interest loans of up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate. SBA regulations permit loans up to $40,000 to repair or replace personal property. Businesses and nonprofits can borrow up to $2 million to restore damaged or destroyed buildings, inventory, equipment and assets. Loan amounts and terms are set by the SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial qualifications.The SBA will establish a Disaster Loan Outreach Center (DLOC) to assist anyone who wishes to apply for a loan. The DLOC will be open at the following location and times:Fayette CountyUniontown City Fire Department84 N. Breeson Blvd.Uniontown, PA  15401Opening: Thursday, March 29, 11 a.m.Days/Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Closed SundayClosing: Thursday, April 5, 3:30 p.m.SBA customer service representatives will be on hand at the disaster loan outreach center to issue loan applications, answer questions about the disaster loan program, explain the application process and help individuals to complete their applications.Individuals and businesses unable to visit the center in person may obtain information and loan applications by calling the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 (1-800-877-8339 for the hearing impaired), or by e-mailing [email protected] applications can also be downloaded at www.sba.gov/disaster. Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. Completed applications should be returned to the DLOC or mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is May 29, 2018.  The deadline to return economic injury disaster loan applications is Dec. 27, 2018.last_img read more

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Brisbane jeweller Jenny McLaurie’s Alderley home ready for auction

first_img28 Braeside Terrace, Alderley.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor9 hours agoMs McLaurie, from Jed & Jewel, specialises in custom designed one-off pieces for clients.She said it was time to move on from her home as she planned to downsize to another property nearby.Canda Reynolds, from McGrath Estate Agents Paddington, said the home was architecturally designed by Brisbane’s Richard Lonn.Ms McLaurie said she would miss the 180 degree panoramic views from upstairs.“This home has been great for entertaining, we’ve had some nice parties here. Sometimes we’ve had up to 10 people drinking champagne in the spa,” she said. 28 Braeside Terrace, Alderley.She said the home would best suit a family with teenagers.“There’s a media room downstairs with four bedrooms and upstairs there’s the parent’s retreat,” Ms McLaurie said. The property is going to auction on February 4 at 10am. 28 Braeside Terrace, Alderley.Brisbane jeweller Jenny McLaurie’s multi-level Alderley home is ready to sell under the hammer next month.The property, at 28 Braeside Tce, is on a 794sq m block and features a swim spa, air-conditioned wine cellar and plenty of parking.last_img read more

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Pension fund for Dutch dentists shifts investment strategy

first_imgSPT, the closed pension fund for dentists and dental consultants in the Netherlands, is to adjust its investment policy to safeguard pensions over the short term and grant indexation over the long term. In light of its low investment target and low risk tolerance, the pension fund is to shift its overall portfolio to 65% European government bonds of at least AA rating – also intended as a hedge of the interest risk on its liabilities – and 35% equities and other securities.The €1.6bn scheme said its new return portfolio – half of which is allocated to developed market equity – must allow for an indexation of 0.85%.But it also stressed that the new investment mix was liquid and therefore easily transferable to another pensions provider, in the event that SPT ceased to exist. According to SPT, of its current 7,400 participants, approximately 45% have already retired.The pension fund expects this percentage to increase to 77% over the next decade, while the number of participants will fall to 6,600.This means the fund’s investment horizon – as well as its recovery period in times of trouble – will become increasingly shorter.Last year, SPT had to pay €53m in pension benefits, but it predicted that, within 11 years, this amount will rise to €80m.Until now, SPT’s investment portfolio has been 25% securities, 60% fixed income and 15% derivatives.The pension fund said that, under its new investment policy, it will avoid “high-cost” investments, as well as asset classes with “unclear sources of return and risk”, such as hedge funds and private equity.This also goes for investments that are illiquid or carry a possible obligation to additional payment, it said, as well as investments “without a reliable market mechanism”, such as property and infrastructure.SPT has also excluded investment classes focusing on active currency positions.The pension fund said its new investment policy was based on the existing financial assessment framework (FTK) from 2007, noting that a new FTK could trigger further changes.last_img read more

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Ireland running out of time on IORP II, trade body warns

first_imgPeter Fahy, chairperson of the IAPF, said: “The government is way behind schedule when it comes to the IORP II directive.“They have left it extremely late to act and have not granted pension trustees and employers any opportunity to consult on how the directive, which provides for proportionate implementation, should be implemented in Ireland.“Assuming the government meets the implementation deadline at this late stage, it will still not allow trustees any realistic opportunity of complying with the new requirements by the 13 January deadline.”He added that, without an exemption or alternative arrangements, employers with small schemes could discontinue pension provision completely.“This is clearly not in the interests of the members of those schemes,” Fahy said.Consultants and regulator The Pensions Authority have previously warned that IORP II placed an onerous compliance burden on pension scheme trustee boards, given Ireland’s relatively small pensions sector.The new rules include ‘fit and proper’ tests for trustees, written policies on key areas of risk management and outsourced services, and minimum standards for communication with members.The Pensions Authority published guidance for trustees regarding what to expect from the IORP II directive at the start of October, but it must be transposed into Irish law by January. The Irish government has yet to legislate for the introduction of IORP II, meaning trustees do not have enough time to comply with its requirements, the Irish Association of Pension Funds (IAPF) has warned.“The government has not granted pension trustees and employers any opportunity to consult on how the directive should be implemented”Peter Fahy, IAPFAt the association’s annual governance conference this week, the IAPF said the government had been focusing too much on other aspects of pension reform, leaving just six weeks to legislate for and implement governance rules stemming from the EU directive.It called for a temporary exemption from new IORP II rules for schemes with 100 members or fewer, until they were able to access master trusts or auto-enrolment structures.last_img read more

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