Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Neural and Pain Sciences

first_imgDepartment of Neural and Pain Sciences at the University ofMaryland at BaltimoreA postdoctoral fellow position is available in the Dr. Man-KyoChung lab at the University of Maryland at Baltimore to study theneuroimmune and neuroskeletal regulation of bone remodeling. Incollaboration with Dr. Vivek Math-Thumbigere, we study mechanismsof neural regulation of bone remodeling in orofacial diseases.. Weare seeking an enthusiastic individual with strong motivation todevelop a new direction of study in combination of bone biology andneuroscience. A record of productivity with excellent verbal andwritten communication skills are essential. Starting salaries arealigned to the NIH NRSA pay scale, with competitive benefits.Interested candidates should submit a statement of researchexperience and interests with a CV including contact informationfor three references to Dr. Man-Kyo Chung([email protected]).Qualifications :Applicants must have a PhD in life sciences and biology. Idealcandidates will have experience with molecular, radiographic,histological and biochemical approaches to the study of bonebiology. An expertise in flow cytometry or experience of workingwith mouse models or craniofacial skeletal tissues ispreferred.last_img read more

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Cafe Coco in “racist” poster controversy with students

first_imgA series of complaints have been directed at Cafe Coco on Cowley Road by students this week, concerning a poster which they hold to be racist displayed inside the café which is clearly visible from the street.Yussef Robinson, BME officer-elect at St. Hilda’s College, the closest college to Cafe Coco, told Cherwell, “The poster is a clear example of old racist advertising. Comparing black people to monkeys and caricaturing our features. It is the familiar trope of black people being portrayed as happy apes. If you look at the poster yourself, the racism is clear.”Complaints about the poster had been made “in a lengthy email, sent about a month ago to Cafe Coco, [and] which gave a full explanation of issues with the poster’’. Robinson added, “On top of this another student at St. Hilda’s complained over a term ago about the poster in a suggestion slip; this was also ignored.”On Thursday, a further student, Rowan Davis of Wadham College, who had gone into Cafe Coco to raise concerns, told Cherwell, “I made a complaint to the manager, emphasising the racist nature of the picture and instead of taking constructive criticism about his establishment he ignored the concerns and burst out laughing as I walked away, showing complete disregard for the very real issues that people of colour have brought up to me.”Zuleyka Shahin of Balliol College, who went into the café to complain yesterday, said, “They basically heard me out and refuted what I stated. It was a long, but calm discussion of sorts. They do not see an issue.’’A spokesperson for Cafe Coco commented, “No complaints have been laughed off by the management. We take all complaints very seriously.’’ He added, “The complaints are being addressed, and looked into.’’Yussef Robinson, however, has yet to receive a response from the establishment, saying, “Coco’s management have repeatedly ignored concerns and belittled complaints surrounding this deeply racist poster. Perhaps they think the ‘vintage’ decor theme should be accompanied with 1930s racism too.”Update 09/09/15: Cafe Coco has told Cherwell that it will be painting over the poster.last_img read more

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Annual Holy Half Marathon raises money for Direct Relief

first_imgKat Robinson | The Observer This year’s Holy Half Marathon and 10k races saw over 1600 participants. The event raised money for Direct Relief, an organization serving those impacted by natural disasters.This year, the proceeds from the registration fees are going to Direct Relief, which is helping those affected by recent natural disasters.“This year, in light of all the natural disasters that have been in Houston, Puerto Rico, Florida — we decided to give back to a natural disaster relief charity,” Lyons said.Lyons said the Holy Half started 14 years ago to raise money for Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.“This year we thought it would be cool to go back to the roots of the race,” she said.One of the best parts of the race is the mix of people who run, Lyons said.“We definitely have people who are really serious about running and running it for time and that’s so great to see to give them a place to do that, but then we also have so many first-time runners,” she said. “ … The community element is really great.”Flannan Hehir, a senior and the winner of this year’s half marathon, said the cause is one of the reasons he runs.“The cause is such a great thing,” he said. “I think so many of your peers are out there supporting you and you’re supporting them, so it’s kind of a mutual relationship where people benefit a lot. … It’s always a cool race.”Daniel Duran, a senior who ran the 10k, said the cause and the motivation to workout were reasons he ran.“You give money to a good cause, and working out is always good for you,” he said. “It gives you a good excuse to get in shape again.”To organize the race, Lyons said the club of just over 10 members has to handle a variety of tasks ranging from obtaining sponsors, overseeing registration, printing t-shirts and medals and coordinating the course logistics.“Every part of the year we’re doing something different,” she said. “In the beginning of the year it’s a lot about contacting charities and sponsors and trying to get that squared away, and then we have to handle everyone’s registration and make sure that gets publicized. In the spring, it’s a lot of planning the logistics of the course and coordinating all the deliveries and making sure everything is squared away.”Not all clubs on campus necessarily allow students to organize an event from start to finish, which is one of the things sophomore Abby Smith, secretary of the Holy Half club and race director, said she likes about the Holy Half.“We never really stop planning it,” she said. “ … It’s also a lot of cross-communication. You’re not just planning something with one person. You have to talk to four or five different people from different areas of the University that make sure things get done.”Senior Katie Lee, the vice president of the club and a race director, said seeing the end of the race makes the work worth it.“It’s a lot of hard work, but it’s really rewarding to see everyone finishing and have everyone’s friends and families cheering them on,” she said. “We get a lot of good feedback, so getting that makes it worth it.”The club members rely on the help of volunteers, especially at the water stations. Some of the water stations are manned by dorms on campus, such as the Flaherty water station.“We have a lot of girls in Flaherty who run the Holy Half, so it’s fun to support them,” Emma Gentine, a junior who was working the station, said. “ … All the runners are very appreciative of everyone who volunteers, and you can make it a lot of fun just screaming and cheering for people, so it’s definitely worth it.”Hannah Morris, a sophomore in Flaherty who also worked the station, said holding out water is something easy to do for those running 13.1 miles.“People are always very friendly and seeing their smiling faces as they grab a cup of water is a pretty nice moment,” she said.Tags: 10k, Direct Relief, half marathon, Holy Half, Holy Half Marathon Over 1600 runners participated in this year’s Holy Half Marathon and 10k races, which were held Saturday. Senior Anna Lyons, the president of the Holy Half club and one of the race directors, said 300 people participated in the 10k and 1300 runners participated in the half marathon. Lyons said an additional 500 runners were on this year’s wait list.“It’s such a great tradition,” she said. “People get so excited about it. We have alumni come in, families come in to watch their kids run or run with them. The students train really hard for it. … All the money goes to charity, so it’s for a really great cause.”last_img read more

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Dates Set for 2015 Tony Awards Nominations and Ceremony

first_img The Tony Awards are presented by the Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing. We now have the date for Broadway’s biggest night next year! The 69th Annual Tony Awards will take place on June 7, 2015 live from Radio City Music Hall in New York City. The ceremony will air on CBS, which has broadcast the event since 1978. The official eligibility cut-off date will be Thursday, April 23, 2015, for all Broadway productions opening in the 2014-2015 season. Productions which meet all other eligibility requirements and open on or before the eligibility date are considered eligible for 2015 Tony Award nominations. The nominations for the 2015 Tony Awards will be announced live on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 from New York City.center_img View Commentslast_img

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Downy Mildew Disease

first_imgFungicide resistance to downy mildew disease is a growing concern for Georgia grape producers. University of Georgia Extension Fruit Disease Specialist Phil Brannen advises growers to modify their fungicide applications to combat the increasing resistance.“If producers properly rotate the chemical ingredients (used in the different fungicides) that treat for downy mildew, this will help our chemical classes be sustainable for years to come,” Brannen said. “We have already essentially lost one of our fungicides — the quinone outside inhibitors (Qol) — and we simply can’t afford to lose more classes if we are to manage this aggressive disease in the future.”According to Brannen, downy mildew diseases are readily observed on leaves of susceptible vegetables, fruits and ornamentals. The downy mildew that impacts grape production is caused by the water mold Plasmopara viticola. In addition to reproducing on the underside of grape leaves, it infects and reproduces on young berries and pedicels. Early infections rot the fruit directly, whereas leaf infections result in defoliation — reducing photosynthesis and resulting in poor quality fruit that would produce unpalatable wine.Georgia’s humid and wet climate makes grape vineyards vulnerable to downy mildew during the growing season.In a research project conducted with UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences graduate student Sarah Campbell in 2017, Brannen studied the resistance effect of downy mildew in multiple Georgia counties, including Cobb, Colquitt, Fannin, Gilmer, Haralson, Rabun and White. In all but Colquitt County, 100-percent resistance to Qol was recorded.Resistance develops over time as one application of the same chemical ingredient is applied repeatedly to the same crop. In some vineyards in Georgia where downy mildew is extremely challenging, growers may apply fungicide as many as 17 times.“Because of the numerous applications of oomycete-active materials, resistance can readily develop to different chemical classes utilized to control downy mildew,” Brannen said. “Spraying fungicides with the same single-site mode-of-action active ingredients repeatedly selects for individuals who are less sensitive to those fungicides. These less sensitive individuals and their progeny remain the in the vineyard and cause significant disease damage, often as if no fungicide had been applied at all.”In addition to downy mildew resistance field surveys, UGA researchers evaluated the effectiveness of eight different fungicides and two combinations of fungicides on grapes at the UGA Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Georgia, and two commercial vineyards. Downy mildew from these sites showed high resistance to the Qol fungicides azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin.Georgia’s grape industry has grown significantly over the past 15 years. Georgia vineyards are located mostly in the Valley and Ridge and Blue Ridge regions of north Georgia and in the Piedmont region of west Georgia. Wine grapes contribute to the Georgia economy, although acreage is relatively small compared to that of North Carolina and Virginia. According to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, the farm gate value for grapes in 2016 was $20.4 million.Hybrid grapes are also being produced in the southern Coastal Plain region. However, they too are susceptible to downy mildew disease.“I would say that downy mildew may be the most difficult-to-control disease in Georgia grapes, and this is true for most, if not all, of the Southeast,” Brannen said.To learn more about Georgia’s grape industry, visit extenextension.uga.edu/topic-areas/fruit-vegetable-ornamentals-production/grapes.htmlsion.uga.edu/topic-areas/fruit-vegetable-ornamentals-production/grapes.html.last_img read more

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Cumberland in Crisis

first_img“When you step off the ferry at Sea Camp, the first thing that strikes you is the silence,” says Alex Kearns, a frequent visitor to Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia’ largest and southernmost barrier island. “Then you hear the wind, and the distant thrum of the ocean, and you hear your breath for the first time.”Less than a mile from the dock, you climb towering dunes and spill out onto a wide, windswept beach, where gulls and terns dance with the tides. Cumberland Island has no beachfront houses or developments, so you often have the entire seashore to yourself.A few property owners are jockeying for permission to build on about 1,000 acres of private land still remaining on Cumberland Island National Seashore, including an 88-acre parcel right next to Sea Camp.However, the island’s scenery and silence may soon change dramatically. A handful of wealthy island families are planning a beachfront development next to Sea Camp that could forever mar the wild, pristine seashore.A few property owners are jockeying for permission to build on about 1,000 acres of private land still remaining on Cumberland Island National Seashore, including an 88-acre parcel right next to Sea Camp.Those property owners are in the midst of negotiations with conservationists, the local county zoning board, and the National Park Service, which owns a vast majority of the island and oversees management and visitation of the park.“To rezone those 1,000 acres for development is to create a blueprint for destruction of the island,” says Kearns.PARADISE LOST?The 88-acre property planned for development stretches across the width of the island just north of Sea Camp Campground, from the ferry dock to the beach. It is adjacent to the island’s most accessible and most visited campground.Lumar Limited Liability Corporation, a company formed in 1997 to buy and hold property and conceal the identity of its owners, purchased the tract in 1998 for $3.5 million from Georgia Rose Rockefeller, a descendent of the Carnegie family, which collectively owned 90 percent of the island at one time. Lumar, LLC, includes members of the Candler family, descendents of Coca-Cola founder Asa Candler, which have also owned land on the island for several generations. The Candler family currently live in several houses on nearly 1,000 acres on the north end of Cumberland Island.Reverend Sam Candler of St. Philip’s Cathedral in Atlanta has spoken publicly about his family’s intentions with the Lumar property, which according to him are only around ten homes for his current and future family. He says his family wants to build “unobtrusive” homes invisible to the eye of any hikers and campers recreating nearby.But most hikers and outdoor organizations worry that any new second-home developments in a national park would be bad for the island.“Development will lead to more people and vehicle traffic on the beach,” says Carol Ruckdeschel, an island naturalist. “The development will require roads, septic systems, well drilling, and infrastructure for garbage. Taken in total, the impact is going to be a lot larger than a few houses, and they will permanently change the character of Cumberland.”[nextpage title=”Read on!”]THE EVOLUTION OF A PARKCongress established Cumberland Island National Seashore in 1972 in order to “maintain the primitive, undeveloped character of one of the largest and most ecologically diverse barrier islands on the Atlantic Coast,” according to its founding legislation.The National Park Service purchased most of the parcels on the island from private landowners, offering many of them a sweetheart deal: the Park Service would buy the land (in many cases, for millions of dollars), maintain roads, build docks and haul trash, and the families would be allowed to live on the island for the rest of their lives, or a set number of years, depending on the agreement.That founding legislation also gave the National Park Service the power of eminent domain over the island, meaning they could legally condemn properties to better conserve and manage the national seashore. It’s a tool that the Park Service used to acquire several tracts on Cumberland Island from non-Carnegie landowners.But two wealthy Carnegie families were allowed to keep their private land within the national park: the family who operates the only commercial entity on the island, Greyfield Inn, and another Carnegie heir who sold 88 acres to Lumar, LLC for development next to Sea Camp.“The intention of the island’s founding legislation was that the Park Service would eventually own all the land on Cumberland Island,” says Cumberland Island National Seashore Superintendent Gary Ingram. “And that’s a good goal to have, especially when you’re trying to manage a wild place like Cumberland Island,” he said.So far, the Park Service has been reluctant to use eminent domain to acquire the remaining 1,000 acres of Carnegie inholdings, but it’s a tool that the Park Service used to create the national seashore—and a tool they could use again to save it from development.“I sold under threat of condemnation,” explains Ruckdeschel, who sold her parcel to the National Park Service in the 1970s and has rights to live on the island until she dies. “How equitable is it to now allow the wealthiest landowners to keep their property and actually develop the island while many others were condemned?”BUY IT BACK?Superintendent Ingram said if property owners were willing to sell the remaining private land, including the 88 acres next to Sea Camp owned by Lumar, LLC, he’s certain the National Park Service could find money from partner conservation entities to purchase it.It would be a win-win: Lumar would be recognized and compensated for providing a critically important tract of land next to Sea Camp, and the park and the general public would have ensured the long-term protection of the seashore.But Sam Candler says he is not interested in selling. “That property…remains in the hands of families who have had a long-standing and sensitive history of caring for the island; I believe that is fortunate for the island,” Candler wrote in an email to Blue Ridge Outdoors.Instead, Candler and Lumar LLC have been pressing the local Camden County zoning board to grant them a variance that will allow them to subdivide the property. Camden County approved the request, much to the dismay of conservation groups and island observers, including Southern Environmental Law Center Lead Attorney Bill Sapp. Sapp has led a multi-organization appeal of the granted variance, claiming that none of the standards required for approval were met.The appeal hearing was delayed several times until April, when Sapp, representatives of Lumar, LLC, Camden County officials, and the National Park Service began negotiations to consider a new zoning designation for the private properties on Cumberland Island.PUBLIC LANDS, PRIVATE PLAYGROUNDSo far, most of the negotiations are not aimed at stopping any current or future development but limiting the number of houses built per acre. Lumar, LLC wants a zoning rule of one house per two acres, which would allow for over 400 additional houses on Cumberland Island.Superintendent Ingram hopes the negotiations can achieve a compromise that has the least amount of island impact.“When the development footprint grows, there will be consequences. What the level of impact will be, I don’t know. If they’re building one structure out there, like a cabin, it’s far less than if they were building multiple 4,000-square-foot structures,” he said.Kearns believes the negotiations are failing the taxpaying American public, who have already spent millions to purchase Cumberland Island.She says that even the strictest limit currently on the table—one house per 25 acres—would still permit 40 additional developments within Cumberland Island National Seashore—more than twice the number of current residences on the island.Kearns believes the negotiations are failing the taxpaying American public, who have already spent millions to purchase Cumberland Island.“No matter what density the county chooses, the island will be permanently scarred and degraded long-term if development is allowed to proceed.”Candler said the private landowners on the island, including his family, have been instrumental in preserving the island’s natural majesty, and for that reason, people should trust that relationship will continue. He said the island is big enough to accommodate additional development, with the less developed wilderness section on the north end of the island providing ecological benefits that allow for more homes on the south end without disturbing a visitor’s island experience substantially.“I want to appeal to those elements of the public who have been on the island and who understand the historic and sensitive way that Cumberland has been sustained by a respectful partnership between the public and private sectors,” wrote Candler. “Most people who have been on Cumberland realize how large the island is. There are certainly areas which have houses on them, but the tremendous majority of the island will always remain without houses,” he said.Superintendent Ingram has a different perspective.“It’s a relatively small island. Any development has impacts. What level those impacts will have we don’t know right now. But it’s not just the human impacts of the development. There is also an environmental one too,” he said.[nextpage title=”Read on!”]RIPPLE EFFECTMany businesses in St. Mary’s rely directly on Cumberland Island visitors to support their businesses. Former Mayor and longtime co-owner of the Riverview Hotel, which sits directly across the street from the island ferry dock, Jerry Brandon, said 90 percent of his business is Cumberland related.“If they start building houses on the middle of the island, that’s going to have a detrimental effect on tourism, and certainly to the purpose of the park, which means we’ll probably lose business,” he said.Brandon was especially concerned that once rules were changed regarding potential development on the island, future generations of Candlers could push for even more and larger-scale developments. That could spell trouble for the island, he said.The same wealthy families who have been claiming that they ‘saved’ Cumberland are now saying they want to rape it some more.—Carol RuckdeschelNegotiations between developers, conservation groups, and the Park Service are ongoing, and no official deadline has been set. With the power of eminent domain, the National Park Service could act on behalf of the public, the original Congressional intent for Cumberland, and the long-term future of the island.“Acquiring the remaining private land on Cumberland Island is probably the most important step that the Park Service can take to protect the future of the national seashore,” says Kearns.However, Candler believes that private property rights should trump the concerns of the general public.“On Cumberland, I observe that some elements of the public want to let all the present houses on the island fall into ruin. Other elements of the public want to respect the rights of private property owners, wherever that property is,” he wrote. “Cumberland Island is…both public and private. Some of us have no history at all there, and some of us have a long history there. None of us should be embarrassed about being there.”Another resident and former property owner, Ruckdeschel, acknowledges that Candler’s desire to build more houses on Cumberland is understandable, but protection of one the country’s last wild islands should take priority over private vacation homes.Says Ruckdeschel, “The same wealthy families who have been claiming that they ‘saved’ Cumberland are now saying they want to rape it some more.”last_img read more

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January 15, 2003 News and Notes

first_img January 15, 2003 Regular News Douglas M. McIntosh of McIntosh, Sawran, Peltz, Cartaya & Petruccelli, P.A., with offices in Ft. Lauderdale, Miami, and West Palm Beach, published an article on “Active Representation” in the Defense Research Institute’s publication titled “For the Defense,” as well as an article in the Broward Barrister in the area of peer review. McIntosh also lectured on “Negotiating the Catastrophic Claim” at the recent Florida Liability Claims Institute. McIntosh also has been awarded the “Outstanding State Representative Award” by the Defense Research Institute. The firm’s Robert D. Peltz also published an article in the Florida State University Law Review titled “The Necessity of Redefining Spoliation of Evidence Remedies in Florida” and lectured on “Spoliation of Evidence” at the recent Florida Liability Claims Institute. In addition, Peltz published “Amendments to Athens Convention Threaten US Maritime Law” in the International Travel Law Journal. The firm’s Carmen Y. Cartaya and Donald J. Fann also co-wrote an article on the aggressive defense of Florida nursing homes, which appeared in the Defense Research Institute’s publication. Fann has also been appointed to the board of directors for the Florida Defense Lawyer’s Association. Michael S. Olin of Podhurst Orseck Josefsberg Eaton Meadow Olin &Perwin, P.A., Miami, was inducted into the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. Howard Coker, a Jacksonville trial attorney and former Florida Bar president, was elected by the Bar’s Board of Governors to serve a six-year-term on the Florida Judicial Qualifications Commission, the group that investigates complaints against judges and recommends sanctions that are carried out by the Florida Supreme Court. Rachel A. Sivilli of Gunster Yoakley, West Palm Beach, participated in the National Business Institute seminar on Florida labor and employment law, in West Palm Beach. Her presentation covered the topics of wrongful termination and sexual harassment. Jay Cohen of Grossman and Roth, Ft. Lauderdale, gave presentations to the South Broward Hospital District and to Universal Health Services. At the South Broward Hospital District’s medical retreat in Key Biscayne, he spoke about medical malpractice issues. At the Universal Health Services risk management conference in Las Vegas, he spoke about malpractice cases and issues to the corporation’s hospital risk managers. Kimberly Kolback of Miami, moderated the panel “The Future of America’s Pastime: Baseball” during the 14th annual Southern Regional Entertainment and Sports Law seminar in Puerto Vallarta, Mex-ico. Lawrence A. Sai-chek, a mediator and arbitrator from Miami,was part of a panel presentation in Tampa, entitled “Winning at Arbitration.” He also made a presentation entitled “Ethics in Mediation” in Boca Raton, as part of a seminar for certified mediators sponsored by Tabas Mediation Group. Larry H. Kunin, a Florida Bar member practicing at Morris Manning & Martin, L.L.P., Atlanta, Georgia, spoke on the topic of anonymous harmful Internet communications at the Technology Law Institute in Atlanta. Bernard Pastor, a member of White & Case, LLP, Miami, spoke at a Miami Today international roundtable program about the far-reaching impact of the USA Patriot Act. As a panelist, he spoke at the newspaper’s recent forum titled “Fallout From Terrorism.” Michael J. Keane of Keane, Reese & Vesely, in St. Petersburg, has been elevated to the position of chair of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. Andrew Needle of Needle Gallagher & Ellenberg, P.A., Miami, was a featured speaker at the recent seminar “Auto Insurance Law and Accident Litigation”. Charles J. Kovaleski, president of Attorneys’ Title Insurance Fund, Inc., in Orlando, has been elected president-elect to the board of governors for the American Land Title Association. Claire Hamner Matturro, a former Sarasota appellate attorney, has won the National Legal Fiction Writing For Lawyers Contest sponsored by SEAK, Inc., a national legal and medical publisher, for her novel entitled Skinny Dipping off the Sunshine Skyway. Bob Murphy, vice president and chief operating officer of Baptist Hospital in Pensacola, is now certified in health care administration by the American College of Healthcare Executives, and is now entitled to use the designation “Certified Healthcare Executive.” Stephen R. Looney of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capuano & Bozarth, Orlando, was a guest speaker at the 45th Kentucky Institute on Federal Taxation in Elizabeth Indiana, speaking about “Reasonable Compensation Issues for Closely Held and Service Companies.” Seymour Benson of Carlton Fields , P.A., Orlando, presented “What is a final judgment in a dissolution of marriage?,”to the Lake County Bar. Benson also spoke to family law mediators in Seminole County in a lecture entitled “Ethics for Mediators.” Dan Bachrach of Baker & Hostetler, L.L.P., Orlando, has been elected to the Board of Trustees of the Orlando Museum of Art. He has also been elected vice president of the Orlando Museum of Art Acquisition Trust. Michael G. Whelan of Whelan, DeMaio & Kiszkiel, P.A., in Miami, presented “Representing Management in Public Sector Collective Bargaining,” at the Florida Public Employer Labor Relations Association’s One-Day Seminar in Orlando. He also presented “Human Resource Issues at the Non-Profit Agency; Effective Non-Profit Board Leadership: A Nuts and Bolt’s Training” at the Hands On Miami’s Conference, and “Hot Topics in Employment Law” at the Florida Association of Police Attorneys, Inc.’s Legal Update Seminar in Ft. Lauderdale. Wallace B. McCall of Jupiter, has published a book of poetry entitled Armadillo Armageddon and Other Collected Poems, which is available from local bookstores, Amazon.com, or Vantage Press, 1-800-882-3273. Kenneth Clayton of Clayton & McCulloh, in Maitland, was the guest speaker at Space Coast Condominiums Association’s program recently. He spoke on the topic of “Screening Renters and Buyers: The Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them.” Jeffrey V. Nelson of Vezina, Lawrence & Piscitelli, P.A., in Miami, has accepted the position of International Counsel and Foreign Commercial Manager for the Italian multinational construction company Rizzani De Eccher S.p.A. Jill S. Schwartz of Jill S. Schwartz & Associates, P.A., Winter Park, has been selected as the Small Business Person of the Year 2002 by the Seminole County Lake Mary Regional Chamber of Commerce. Robert Zarco of Zarco Einhorn & Salkowski, P.A., in Miami, recently spoke at the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Los Angeles, CA on the topic of “Franchising Today: Exploring New Markets and New Opportunities.” Zarco also spoke at The International Hardee’s Convention in Miami, where his topic was “The Ten Most Dangerous Contract Clauses in the Hardee’s Franchise Agreement.” In addition Zarco addressed the Cuban American CPA Association in Miami, regarding “Financial Management of a Franchised Business and the Role of the CPA.” Mark A. Sessums of Frost Tamayo Sessums &Aranda, Bartow, has been elected to the office of president of the Polk County Family Lawyers’ Association. Mary Harris Moore of Tallahassee, has been reappointed by the Supreme Court of Florida to a second term of membership on the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. Michael A. Lampert of West Palm Beach, has been elected to the National Board of the Association of Jewish Family and Children’s Agencies. He has also been reelected president of the Jewish Residential & Family Services, from whom he received the Sadie Freedman Outstanding Volunteer Award. William J. Schifino, Jr., a shareholder with Williams Schifino Mangione & Steady, P.A., Tampa, has been appointed to the board of directors of the Florida Guardian Ad Litem Association, Inc. Louis R. Battista, a partner with Krupnick Campbell Malone Buser Slama Hancock McNelis Lieberman & McKee, P.A., Ft. Lauderdale, was given an appreciation award recognizing his volunteer work for the fifth annual Jazz Spectacular Concert, benefitting the Nan Knox Boys and Girls Club in Ft. Lauderdale. Ed Silberhorn, U.S. General Counsel and corporate secretary for Mitel Networks, Inc., and member of the Telecommunications Industry Association Global Enterprise Market Development Leadership Council, has received the 2002 Tom F. Carter Award, recognizing his service in the public interest in the field of telecommunications. Jerald D. August of August & Kulunas, P.A., West Palm Beach, was selected to speak at two topical sessions for the 61st annual New York University Institute on Federal Taxation. August addressed Institute attendees in a workshop about the “Tax Benefits and Traps with Family Limited Partnerships.” He also participated in a panel discussion on “Key Tax and Non-tax Aspects of Acquisitions of Stock of Assets.” George J. Felos of Dunedin, has published a book entitled Litigation as Spiritual Practice, a book inspired by his experience with right-to-die cases, which examines, in depth, death and dying. He is also the instructor for Meditation for Lawyers, an instructional course accredited for continuing legal education. Stefan Rubin of Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., Ft. Lauderdale, was appointed to the Broward Alliance Film and Television Commission, a full service coordination office for all those shooting feature films, industrial films, documentaries, commercials, made for television movies, etc. Noreen S. Dreyer of Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., Ft. Lauderdale, has been elected to the board of directors of the Economic Development Council of St. Lucie County. Todd Foster of Cohen, Jayson & Foster, P.A., Tampa, lectured on prosecutorial misconduct and federal grand jury abuse to the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers Miami Chapter, and to the Broward Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Alan L. Gabriel, a member of Katz, Barron, Squitero & Faust, P.A., Ft. Lauderdale, recently spoke at the “What You Need to Know About Public Records and Open Meetings in Florida” seminar at Bahia Mar Beach. Kurt D. Panouses, of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capuano & Bozarth, Orlando, finished a two-year term as chair of the Wuesthoff Hospital Foundation Board. Derek E. Bruce, an attorney with Gray Harris, Orlando, has been elected to the board of governors of the African American Chamber of Commerce of Central Florida. Charles H. Damsel, Jr. of Charles H. Damsel, Jr., P.A., West Palm Beach, was recently honored as a 50-year member of Florida Blue Key, a University of Florida leadership honorary. Kimberly Glas-Castro of Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., West Palm Beach, has been elected to a two-year term as chair of the Treasure Coast Section of the Florida Chapter of the American Planning Association. She has also been named co-chair of the 2003 FAPA conference in Palm Beach. Barry Nelson of Nelson & Levine, P.A., North Miami Beach, presented Current Trend and Traps in Estate Planning for the Florida Institute of CPAs at its Federal Institute on Taxation in Orlando. He also presented the Recent Federal Tax Developments in Estate Planning, in Ft. Lauderdale, at the Estate and Financial Planning Conference. David W. Henry of Allen, Dyer, Doppelt, Milbrath & Gilchrist, Orlando, recently spoke on “IP Remedies and Thorny CGL Problems,” at the DRI Intellectual Property and Insurance Seminar in Phoenix, Arizona. Douglas P. Lawless of Taylor, Lawless and Singer, P.A., Sarasota, was appointed by Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead to the Mediator Qualifications Board, which hears grievances that have been filed against certified and court-appointed mediators. Mark J. Neuberger, managing partner of Buchanan Ingersoll, Miami, was honored recently by the Washington Mutual Coconut Grove Arts Festival in recognition of his personal and professional contributions to the event. He was selected as the recipient of the first annual Sandy and Marty Rubenstein Award, honoring a couple who has given 40 years of volunteer service to the festival. Stuart C. Markman, of Kynes, Markman & Felman, P.A., was awarded the 2002 George C. Carr Memorial Award for excellence in federal practice and distinguished service to the Federal Bar. Patricia Kimball Fletcher of Duane Morris, Miami, was recently appointed to the board of governors for the Bankers Club of Miami. Cynthia Crofoot Rignanese, of The Law Offices of J. Kelly Kennedy, Winter Haven, was featured in the “Alumni Spotlight” in the University of Florida’s quarterly magazine, the Triangle ; the article covered her Bar activities, Kiwanis activities, and her radio show, “Lady Lawyer Live.” William Phillippi of Broad and Cassel, Ft. Lauderdale, made a presentation to the Finance Network Club in Broward County. His presentation was entitled “Brave New World for Secured Lenders — Practical Tips on UCC Rev. Article 9.” Bruce A. Blitman of Ft. Lauderdale, presented “Conflict Resolution” at a condominium and cooperative education seminar sponsored by Community Associations Institure (CAI), the designated condominium and cooperative education provider of Florida’s Department of Professional and Business Regulation, Division of Florida Land Sales, Condominiums and Mobile Homes. Howard D. Rosen of Donlevy-Rosen & Rosen, Coral Gables, recently presented “Asset Protection Overview” to the estate planning council of Ventura County, California. Rosen also recently presented a talk on “Protecting Retirement Plan Assets, Real Estate & Accounts Receivable” the Dade Chapter of the Florida Institute of CPAs. Rich Fulton of Baker & Hostetler, L.L.P., Orlando, has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Orlando Regional Workforce Development Partnership, Inc. January 15, 2003 News and Noteslast_img read more

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Study of acceptable tourism capacities of the City of Labin

first_imgThe question arises of the optimal development of the City of Labin, which its overall economic development is largely based on the development of tourism. With this in mind, it is about tourism as an economic branch that requires constant adaptation to market trends while respecting specific spatial values, and all in order to make tourism sustainable and competitive, this study of Acceptable Tourism Capacities of the City of Labin was made.According to the local portal in Labin, the study caused a lot of discontent in certain segments, so after the public debate, according to unofficial data from the study, it is time to finish it.Studija je dobar zbroj i sistematizacija infrastrukturnih problema koje smo više manje i do sada znali kao što su ceste, parkiranje, odvodnja, voda, radna snaga, izjavio je Silvano Vlačić, labinski poduzetnik i nezavisni vijećnik labinskog Gradskog vijeća za Glas Istre, te  dodao da su navedene neke tvrdnje koje su po njemu vrlo dvojbene u smislu benefita i pozitivnih efekata za grad i građane. “In just one sentence, without any explanation, they claim that it is better for the City to have hotel guests, even if they are on All inclusive and spend practically nothing outside, than guests in private accommodation. I am commenting on a media article in a professional newspaper that says that family accommodation is based on private property of individuals and families, and only through taxes and lump sums it gives the state 400 million kuna a year directly, without the state investing a single penny. So, despite the current capacity of more than half a million beds in that accommodation, there is still room for its growth, even up to twice the number now. And this is not a problem if the tourist destination is managed in the right way, the reasons for arrival, events, events that will bring guests all year round are devised” izjavio je Vlačić.Attachment: Study of acceptable tourism capacities of the City of LabinIn the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”The Tourist Board of the City of Labin realized 11 percent more arrivals and 7 percent more overnight stays in eight monthsNa području Turističke zajednice Grada Labina je u kolovozu 2018. godine ostvareno je  49.035 dolazaka ili 5 % više, te 371.845 noćenja ili 3% više od lanjskog kolovoza. U prvih osam mjeseci ove godine ostvareno je 188.992 dolazaka što je porast od 11% u odnosu na lani, te1.180.777 noćenja ili  7% više u odnosu na isto lanjsko razdoblje. Udio stranih gostiju je 97%  s time da broj njihovih dolazaka povećan za 10% a broj ostvarenih noćenja je 8% viši nego u 2017.Udio domaćih gostiju je 3%. Oni bilježe 31% više dolazaka nego lani dok su noćenja 1% niža od ostvarenih u 2017. Nijemci su i dalje naši najbrojniji gosti s udjelom od 33% u ukupno ostvarenim noćenjima. Oni su ostvarili 15% više dolazaka i 9% više noćenja nego lani.  Slijede ih Austrijanci koji kontinuirano bilježe rast u našoj destinaciji . Oni bilježe 13% više dolazaka i 11% više noćenja nego lani, a udio u ukupnim noćenjima je 14%. Gosti iz Velike Britanije su treći sa 7% udjela u ukupno ostvarenim noćenjima, slijede gosti iz Slovenije s udjelom od 6%, pa gosti iz Italije s udjelom od 5%. The study Acceptable Capacities of Tourism of the City of Labin is being prepared because in the last decade from year to year there has been an increase in tourist traffic on the territory of the City of Labin but also on the coast of the entire Croatian Adriatic. During the peak of the summer tourist season, crowds are becoming more frequent, primarily on roads, parking lots, beaches and the old town of Labin.In addition to technical infrastructure (water and electricity supply, traffic jams, wastewater disposal, municipal waste disposal) which is at the peak of the tourist season during the peak season, challenges have been identified from a social point of view (because there are more and more misunderstandings between people tourism and those who do not deal with it), and disproportionate accommodation capacities between private apartments and hotels were observed. The Institute of Tourism has prepared a Draft Proposal of the Study of Acceptance Capacities of Tourism of the City of Labin for the City of Labin, which was held at the Public Conference from August 1 to August 31, 2018.last_img read more

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Sanders to ‘assess’ campaign after primary drubbing by Biden

first_imgBernie Sanders was talking to advisers on Wednesday as pressure mounted on the leftist Vermont senator to end his White House campaign following a drubbing by Joe Biden in the latest Democratic primaries.As the coronavirus outbreak played havoc with the primary schedule, calls grew among Democrats for Sanders to bow out to allow the centrist Biden to focus on beating President Donald Trump in November.Biden, 77, trounced Sanders, 78, in the three states which went to the polls on Tuesday — Arizona, Florida and Illinois — to build up an all-but impregnable lead in the number of delegates needed to head the Democratic ticket. Trump taunt From the White House, Trump taunted the Democrats, repeating his accusation that the party elite sabotaged Sanders — whom the president’s own campaign views as the weaker potential opponent.The Democratic National Committee “will have gotten their fondest wish and defeated Bernie Sanders, far ahead of schedule,” Trump tweeted.”Now they are doing everything possible to be nice to him in order to keep his supporters. Bernie has given up, just like he did last time. He will be dropping out soon!” Trump said, referring to Sanders’s failed fight for the nomination in 2016.Trump also appeared to be attempting to rile up Sanders’ supporters, whose willingness to transfer their support to Biden could be crucial in the November contest.Biden for his part has experienced an astonishing change of fortune — his campaign was left for dead just one month ago after poor showings in early voting states.Sanders meanwhile has struggled against perceptions that he is too far left to defeat Trump.He admitted as much last week when he said Democratic voters have told him they back his agenda of health care for all and battling income inequality, but they were voting for Biden because he has a better chance of winning back the White House.  “The next primary contest is at least three weeks away,” Shakir said in a statement. “Senator Sanders is going to be having conversations with supporters to assess his campaign.”In the immediate term, however, he is focused on the government response to the coronavirus outbreak.”Several states have postponed primaries because of the pandemic and both candidates have been forced to halt public rallies and turn to virtual campaigning.Biden trounced Sanders in each of Tuesday’s battlegrounds, taking 62 percent of the vote in Florida against 23 percent for Sanders and winning by 59 percent to 36 percent in Illinois.In Arizona, Biden had nearly 44 percent to Sanders’ nearly 32 percent.Voters had also been scheduled to go to the polls in Ohio but the governor of the midwestern state postponed the election, citing the coronavirus outbreak. Topics :center_img ‘I think it is time’ The surging Biden has now won 19 of the 27 state contests held so far.The victories underscored his position as the clear frontrunner and the eagerness of Democratic leaders and party rank and file to come together around a moderate standardbearer to challenge Trump.According to a count by RealClearPolitics, Biden has racked up 1,153 delegates to Sanders’ 874, with 1,991 needed to capture the nomination.Given Biden’s substantial lead in opinion polls in many of the states yet to hold primaries, Sanders faces an uphill battle.Former Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri urged him to drop out.”I think it is time,” McCaskill told MSNBC. “Bernie’s going to have plenty of delegates and power to influence the platform,” she said of the policies to be declared at the party’s July convention.Biden said he was closer to securing the nomination and was building “a broad coalition” that the party requires to defeat Trump.”The next president will have to salvage our reputation, rebuild confidence in our leadership, and mobilize our country and our allies to rapidly meet new challenges — like future pandemics. We need a leader who will be ready on day one,” he said in a tweet Wednesday.  “The race for the nomination is over,” said Democratic strategist David Axelrod, who ran Barack Obama’s two presidential campaigns. “That is the reality Bernie Sanders faces.”While his hopes of winning the nomination may look increasingly dim, the senator strongly denied press reports that he was dropping out.”Anybody who suggests that at this point we are ending the campaign is not telling the truth,” Sanders told CNN.Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir did say, however, that the candidate was holding talks to “assess” the future.last_img read more

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‘I would have respected my contract’ – Arsene Wenger opens up on Arsenal exit

first_img Comment Advertisement Wenger was forced out the door at the Emirates (Picture: Getty Images)Arsene Wenger has opened up on his Arsenal exit, admitting he wanted to see out the remaining year of his contract, but the club thought otherwise.In a spell spanning over two decades, Wenger led the Gunners to three league titles and seven FA Cups, but in 2018, the Frenchman left the club he held so close to his heart.Wenger’s earlier years were his most successful, with his Invincibles side of 2003/04 remaining the only Premier League team to go a whole season without losing a single league game. ‘I would have respected my contract’ – Arsene Wenger opens up on Arsenal exit Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterFriday 2 Oct 2020 7:07 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link2.3kShares Wenger said goodbye to Arsenal after 22 years (Picture: Getty Images)Their Champions League final loss in 2006 at the hands of Barcelona was the beginning of Arsenal’s downturn in fortunes, as Wenger’s Invincible team slowly broke up and finances tightened by their move to the Emirates Stadium in the same year as their European heartbreak.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTA section of Arsenal fans began to turn on the manager and he eventually jumped before he was pushed, announcing his departure from the club in April 2018.In a wide-ranging interview with The Times, Wenger admitted if it was down to him, he would have seen out his contract, but also conceded that his 22-year spell at the club may have gone on for too long.‘I would have respected my contract,’ he said. ‘The club thought it was better I stopped. More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘I’d always lived with the idea that could happen. The supporters were not happy any more. Some of them. ‘You can understand that, at some stage, 22 years, people want a change.‘Maybe I stayed too long. I don’t know. But I was committed like on the first day. I think I guided the club through the most difficult period in a very successful way. ‘At some stage people say you’re too old, but they don’t really look at what you do. I served the club as much as I could.’MORE: Mikel Arteta explains how Mesut Ozil can force his way back into the Arsenal teamMORE: Europa League draw: Arsenal, Tottenham, Leicester, Celtic and Rangers learn their fateFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and InstagramFor more stories like this, check our sport pagelast_img read more

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