Holiday Shopping List! The Top Five Shows Kids Will Go Wild For

first_img THE RADIO CITY CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR There’s nothing quite like New York City during the holidays, and if your kiddo hasn’t witnessed the magic of The Radio City Christmas Spectacular, the time is now. From high-kicking Rockettes, to a stuffed animal performance of The Nutcracker, to snow swirling through the audience, nothing says “holiday cheer” quite like this one-of-a-kind celebration. Click for tickets! THE LION KING The Minskoff Theatre is magically transformed into the African Pridelands in this now-iconic musical adaptation of the hit Disney movie. The production may be 17 years old, but it’s still every bit as spectacular as it was when it first opened on Broadway in 1997. Featuring hundreds of colorful costumes, eye-popping sets and hits like “Hakuna Matata” and “The Circle of Life,” The Lion King truly is a child’s Disney dream come to life. Click for tickets! MATILDA Kids rule in the stage adaptation of Roald Dahl’s beloved novel Matilda—they’re speeding by on scooters, gobbling cake, swinging high in the air and being downright “Naughty.” The hit musical, which stars more than a dozen children, wowed audiences in the West End before transferring to Broadway. There’s magic, there’s scary grown-ups, there’s high-flying dance numbers, and trust us—your kids will be enthralled from beginning to end. Click for tickets! Christmas is just a few days away and—wait, you still haven’t finished all of your holiday shopping?! Don’t worry, Broadway.com has you covered. Show tickets happen to make excellent stocking stuffers, and from flashy, splashy musicals to highbrow, intellectual drama, there’s something for everyone—especially kids! And don’t forget, if you can’t decide on a show, there’s always a Broadway.com gift card. Check out our top picks below! CINDERELLA There’s only a few weeks left to see the updated revival of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella on Broadway, and it’s definitely worth a trip to the royal kingdom. Starring Keke Palmer as Ella and Real Housewives’ NeNe Leakes as her not-so-sweet stepmother Madame, there’s plenty to love in the revamped tuner. Our favorite part? Ella’s “how the heck did they do that?!” pauper-to-princess transformation, featuring dazzling costumes by William Ivey Long. Click for tickets! View Comments ALADDIN We’ve been waiting years for Aladdin to fly to the Great White Way, and now that it’s here, it’s every bit as spectacular as we’d hoped. Featuring a triple-threat ensemble cast and a gorgeous score by Alan Menken (featuring several songs not heard in the 1992 film), there’s never a dull moment in this shining, shimmering tuner. And how do they make that magic carpet fly? You’ll have to see it to believe it. Click for tickets!last_img read more

Read more

‘Gardening’ finale

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaIn his last “Gardening inGeorgia” show of the season, hostWalter Reeves looks atpropagating houseplants over the winter Oct. 29 on Georgia PublicBroadcasting.”Gardening in Georgia” is produced by GPB and the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. It’stelevised each Saturday at 12:30 and 7 p.m.On this week’s show, Reeves shows how to build a wooden boxcontaining a small light bulb to keep the rooting soil warm, akey to successful propagating. He covers the box with a metalcookie sheet and fills the makeshift propagation tray with leafcuttings from favorite houseplants.Reeves visits Callaway Gardens with Hank Bruno, who shows himsome American beautyberry varieties, including an eye-poppingwhite-berried form.He takes a look at bromeliads, too. These holiday delights havecenters filled with water but roots that like to be dry. Theflowers are unlike those on any other plant. Reeves shows how touse an apple to force a bromeliad to bloom. He shows how to breakoff a “pup” from a mature plant, too, and plant it in loosepotting soil.Finally, Bob Westerfield of the UGA Center for Urban Agriculturetells about the free publication, “FloweringBulbs for Georgia Gardeners.” Get a copy from your UGACooperative Extension county office, or download one from the Webat http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/B918.htm.last_img read more

Read more

Watermelon Diseases

first_imgJune’s rainfall increased the potential for diseases to strike south Georgia watermelon fields, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts.Plant diseases, such as phytophthora blight, fruit rot, downy mildew, gummy stem blight and anthracnose, have a tendency to take hold in watermelon fields as a result of heavy moisture.The pathogen responsible for the phytophthora blight thrives in wet conditions and attacks watermelon fruits, causing pre- and postharvest yield losses. Gummy stem blight is a fungal disease that causes necrotic, dark-colored lesions on leaves and, in severe cases, gummy exudations on stems, UGA plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta said. Anthracnose is a fungal disease that also prefers warm, moist conditions. Symptoms include necrotic, irregularly shaped lesions on leaves and dark, sunken spots on fruits.Dutta believes these diseases could impact yields if farmers don’t maintain a stringent treatment program this growing season.“While some places in southern Georgia may have had only a couple of inches of rain in the last couple of weeks, there have been other places that have had more than 8 or 9 inches. Thus far, growers have been diligent with their fungicide sprays, and disease has not been a problem that has impacted farmers across the board. But, due to conditions in specific locations, it may become an issue,” UGA vegetable horticulturist Timothy Coolong said.Between June 1 and June 18, Moultrie, Georgia, received 4.07 inches of rainfall, according to the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network. During the same time period last year, Moultrie received only 4.4 inches. In this interval, Moultrie saw 14 rainy days compared to just six rainy days the previous year.Tifton, Georgia, received less rainfall from June 1 to June 18 this year than last year — 2.6 inches compared to 3.26 inches. However, there have been 13 rainy days in Tifton during this period in 2017 compared to just seven rainy days this time a year ago.“Conditions are certainly not ideal. I think if you ask most growers, they would prefer warm and dry conditions. Earlier this spring, the weather was warmer and drier than is typical, but with continuous rain events like we’ve had recently, conditions are now favorable for the development of several diseases,” Coolong said.Increased rainfall does mean a decrease in temperatures. In Moultrie last year, from June 1 to June 18, the average high temperature was 90.42 degrees Fahrenheit. This year, the average temperature for the same time period is 85.97 F. In Cordele, Georgia, last year’s average high temperature was 92.29 F compared to 86.95 F this year.“Last year, the second week in June was quite warm. The temperature was in the low- to mid-90 degree range every day for several days. The high temperatures with clear skies caused sun scald damage to the melons,” Coolong said. “This week is supposed to be mostly cloudy, meaning less potential for sunburn. But the disadvantage is that the wet weather could lead to more disease potential.” The accumulated rainfall means growers must pay the extra cost of chemical applications. Farmers could invest $70 or $80 per acre in a spray program to combat these diseases, Coolong said.“If you add that up over several hundred acres, it is a significant weekly expense,” he said. “I would say that vegetable growers prefer dry conditions. Spray control for these diseases can be very expensive.”Watermelons are grown predominantly in south Georgia and had a farm gate value of $124.5 million in 2015, according to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development.last_img read more

Read more

Office of Global Programs

first_imgUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students and faculty gathered Monday to celebrate their commitment to international cooperation and scholarship and to discuss current issues in food security.This was the college’s eighth annual International Agriculture Day Lecture and Reception. The event has become a time to reflect on the international nature of agriculture and the importance of agricultural development in building a safer, healthier world.“Perhaps the single greatest challenge that these students will face is feeding a global population that is expected to exceed 9 billion people in a relatively short period of time,” said CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue. “We need to do this while maintaining and conserving our natural resources. We aim to provide them with the very best education and opportunities to prepare them to meet that challenge and conquer it.“Today we focus our attention on one of the major hurdles: understanding other cultures and how we need to work together to build a more food-secure world.”The gender gap is a culturally based agricultural challenge that must be overcome, said keynote speaker Helga Recke, a Visiting Fellow in Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ Advancing Women in Agriculture through Research and Education (AWARE) program.Feeding the world’s growing population will only be possible if all farmers, including the nearly 50 percent of farmers who are women, are empowered to produce their best crops.Lack of credit, lack of education and cultural subordination keep female farmers around the world producing about 20 to 30 percent less than their male counterparts. This disparity must be overcome to provide worldwide food security.Recke has spent her career on the forefront of global agricultural development, studying the ways that gender impacts agricultural development and supporting education and professional development for female agricultural scientists across the developing world.In her lecture, “Efforts to Narrow the Gender Gap in Agriculture: One Woman’s Journey,” Recke discussed how traditional and transitional gender roles affect agricultural development and scientific progress in the developing world.“Gender in agriculture is not just a hobby horse,” Recke said. “It has real consequences if you pay attention.”Agricultural development efforts that ignore the way women use agricultural technologies or the division of labor between women and men on farms are bound to fail.As part of the effort to create agricultural technologies responsive to the needs of both female and male farmers, Recke has spent two decades supporting leadership roles for female scientists and extension specialists in developing countries and around the world.Having a more diverse group of scientists who are developing technologies will lead to a more diverse set of solutions for farmers, she said. These are the types of solutions that students and faculty members gathered at Monday’s event will develop in the coming century.The CAES Office of Global Programs, which hosts the International Agriculture Day Lecture and Reception each spring, honored some of the college’s most globally minded students with travel grants, scholarships and awards at the event. Students who will graduate this year with the college’s International Agriculture Certificate were also recognized.Kirsten Allen, a senior pursuing a bachelor’s degree in pharmaceutical sciences and a minor in plant biology and a certificate recipient, told the crowd how her internship in Piacenza, Italy, broadened her worldview and inspired her to work internationally.Other students received the certificate:Jeffrey Bowden, bachelor’s degree in applied biotechnology and an internship in Beauvais and Frausseilles, FranceNicole Encardes, bachelor’s degree in horticulture and an internship in Pamplona, SpainLori Hanna, bachelor’s degree in environmental health, master’s degree in public health and an internship in Havana, CubaAlexandria Talley, bachelor’s degree in avian biology and an internship in Khon Kaen, ThailandElizabeth Umanah, bachelor’s degree in applied biotechnology and an internship in Thiès, SenegalInternational Agriculture Certificate students expand their global perspectives by participating in internationally focused coursework, language study and a hands-on international internship aligned with their academic and career goals.Students who earned other internationally focused awards were recognized:Graduate International Travel Awards These awards will fund an international activity that supports each student’s interest in international collaboration and global issues. The award covers round-trip airfare to an international conference or research site.Cristiano Bortoluzzi, doctoral candidate in poultry scienceJune Brawner, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciences and doctoral student in anthropologyFernanda Castro, doctoral student in poultry scienceKelsey Coffman, doctoral candidate in entomologyCarson Dann, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciencesZhongyuan Liu, doctoral student agricultural and applied economicsJeffrey Standish, doctoral candidate in plant pathologyAna Villegas-Gamble, doctoral student in poultry scienceKanemasu Global Engagement AwardThis award recognizes a student who goes above and beyond in internationalizing his/her academic program at UGA.Elizabeth Umanah, bachelor’s degree in applied biotechnologyBroder-Ackermann Global Citizen AwardThis award recognizes a CAES undergraduate student who has embraced global citizenship through participation, promotion and leadership of international initiatives during his/her collegiate career.Stacie Evans, bachelor’s degree student in biological scienceGlobal Food Security International Travel ScholarshipHiram Larew, adjunct professor in the CAES Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication and a 1975 CAES horticulture graduate, has worked his whole career to end food insecurity around the world.This year he established the Global Food Security International Travel Scholarship to support CAES undergraduate or graduate students who participate in an international education activity focused on the global community and food insecurity.Grant Freeman, bachelor’s degree student in biological scienceTerence J. Centner International Scholarship CAES Professor Terence Centner has studied the intersection of environmental policies and outcomes in agricultural and natural resource conservation settings for 30 years. This year, as part of his commitment to international scholarship and education, he established the Terence J. Centner International Scholarship.The scholarship will support a CAES undergraduate student who participates in a semesterlong exchange program at a UGA partner university in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe or South America.Mallory Warren, bachelor’s degree student in environmental economicsWen Williams International Travel Scholarship Over the three decades he spent in Conner Hall, Wen Williams, retired CAES professor of agricultural and applied economics and associate dean and director for academic affairs, impacted the lives of thousands of students.This year, in support of his mission to broaden the horizons of CAES students, he established the Wen Williams International Travel Endowment Fund, which supports a CAES undergraduate student participating in one of the college’s study abroad, international internship or exchange programs.Kendall Sewell, bachelor’s degree student in environmental economics and managementAgriculture Abroad Photo ContestThe Agriculture Abroad Photo Contest is open to all CAES students. The contest encourages them to share images of agriculture from around the world.First place went to Ellen Hardin for the photo, “Unconventional Diet.”Second place went to Chandler Mulvaney for the photo, “Dancing for Farmers.”Third place went to Zane Tacket for the photo, “Victor.”To see photos from the event, including contest entries, visit www.tinyurl.com/internationalag2018.For more information about the Office of Global Programs, visit www.global.uga.edu.last_img read more

Read more

Clips of the Week: Ski the Rainforest, Emus Attack, Winter SUP, Explore Park, Freebord

first_imgOur favorite outdoor videos from around the web for the week that was:1. Ski the RainforestValhalla, the latest ski flick from the brilliant minds at Sweetgrass Productions, features some weird/awesome cinematography, but none more so than this clip of some bros who ski the rainforest, during the summer. SPOILER: To read about how the pulled it off, click here.Forest Ski Segment From Valhalla from Sweetgrass Productions on Vimeo.2. Emu vs. Weasel BallThese emus, and one ostrich, absolutely bug out when they come in contact with a weasel ball. What does this have to do with the outdoors? Nothing.3. PocoshockWinter whitewater stand up paddleboarding in Virginia? Sure, why not.Pocoshock from Hunter on Vimeo.4. Explore ParkSome winter riding at Explore Park outside Roanoke, Va. Explore Park has some awesome trails, and these guys do a nice job mixing up the POV camera angles. Good wreck at 1:14.5. Shredding ConcreteThis is a video featuring Freebord, which is essentially a snowboard for the streets. These guys are really good. We have one in the office so look for a review soon.Go Freebord! from Freebord Mfg. on Vimeo.last_img read more

Read more

Colombia Neutralizes Wanted Criminal

first_imgBy Yolima Dussán/Diálogo January 10, 2019 On December 21, 2018, the Colombian Armed Forces neutralized Walter Patricio Arízala, alias Guacho, head of the remnant organized armed group known as Oliver Sinisterra. Guacho was considered the main terrorist and narcotrafficker in the region, and was believed to be responsible for the terrorist attacks of January 2018 and the kidnapping and murder of three Ecuadorean journalists on the border between Ecuador and Colombia in April 2018. To avoid the regrouping of criminals who followed him, the Colombian Armed Forces increased operations and checkpoints in southern territories. “It’s one of the steps we had to take in the area. We know that there are many people behind the narcotrafficking business,” said Army General Ricardo Jiménez Mejía, commander of the Colombian Military Forces’ Joint Chiefs of Staff. “This will change the situation for the better in Nariño.” Gen. Jiménez pointed to the joint initiative of the country’s forces as one of the most important aspects of this blow against crime. “Those who do not abide by the law will be captured or neutralized in military operations,” he said. Death, terrorism, and narcotrafficking Guacho became a member of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia’s (FARC, in Spanish) Front 29 in 2007. He soon took over as the financial head of the FARC’s Daniel Aldana mobile column, and then its leader. In early 2017, he left the peace negotiations between the FARC and the Colombian government to start his own armed group, known as the United Guerrillas of the Pacific and/or the Oliver Sinisterra Front. The murder of the kidnapped Ecuadorean journalists led the government of Ecuador to increase the original reward from $100,000 to $230,000 for information leading to Guacho’s capture. Colombia and Ecuador worked together without respite to find the criminal. Partner nations such as the United States, through its Rewards Program, also supported the effort. Operation David “We can confirm that alias Guacho was neutralized in a joint operation the Army, the police, and the Attorney General’s office conducted,” said Colombian President Iván Duque. “Colombia deserves for those who work toward reintegration to be successful, but those who intend to continue with violence will be dissuaded, disrupted, and punished by the government,” he added. Under Operation David, the troops of the Joint Special Operations Command arrived in Azúcar-Piedra Fina, Tumaco, where alias Guacho hid. Authorities also neutralized one of his most trusted men, alias Pitufín. It was the end of a precise operation, where many investigative techniques were used to intercept more than 120 phone lines. The information enabled authorities to detect and monitor 16 areas where the criminal operated. “The entry of our military and police officers into the area, silently and in camouflage, enabled us to get closer to the criminal, who confronted us,” General Óscar Atehortúa, head of the National Police, told the press. “We can’t say that public order was completely restored in the region, but we indeed made a lot of progress in terms of security.” Ringleader surrounded Authorities intensified joint and interagency operations against Guacho in March 2018, using his communications with subordinates to facilitate the location and destruction of drug labs, which in turn affected his finances and made him contact organizations and people who weren’t part of his circle. He broke security protocols and began using unsafe channels. “We closed his circle and surrounded him. This is a message for criminals to abide by the law and surrender to reintegration programs,” General Nicasio de Jesús Martínez, commander of the Colombian Army, told the press. “We proved that the teamwork of public forces and government agencies bears excellent results.” Colombian Minister of Defense Guillermo Botero emphasized the importance of improving the border region’s security and relations with Ecuador, while confirming ongoing interventions in the area. “We know that we can’t let up and that criminals and ringleaders threaten the Tumaco area. We identified Guacho’s possible successors. Our forces’ combined operations won’t stop. These criminals will go down.”last_img read more

Read more

Cappelli: We are considering a deferral of payment according to the “3 + 3” model

first_imgYesterday, various meetings were held at the Banski dvori to agree on final measures to help the economy from the negative impact of the coronavirus on the entire market. More about all concrete measures will be found out today, when they will be presented at the Government session, which will then go to the Parliament for adoption, publication in the Official Gazette and are expected to be active from next week. Also, Cappelli pointed out that some measures are under the jurisdiction of local self-government units (JLS), such as a flat tax per bed in family accommodation, so that they are also discussed in which direction everything should go. Minister of Tourism Gari Cappelli in front of the Parliament, he stated that tomorrow the Government from the tourism sector will be subject to a measure of deferral of payments according to the “3 + 3” model. Minister of Finance Zdravko Marić za RTL Today He said a set of measures he would present today in the short term could have an effect. “Surgically precise measures in such a short time we can not do, but most importantly to put this tomorrow in the emergency procedure procedure. An integral part of these measures is liquidity. On the one hand, there are public benefits – income tax, profit tax and contributions. According to the working version, and we will agree on the details during the day and night until the session, we are talking about a three-month deferral of payment with a possible additional three months of extension. On the other hand, there are credit and lines in cooperation with HBOR, CNB and HUB, all of which are in some way aimed at focusing a similar principle on the credit arrangement. Said Maric. Source: Index.hr, RTL Danas / Photo: Index Video “It is important for us that there is a delay, such as a delay in the payment of tourist tax, tourist membership fees, hoteliers in the payment of concessions in camps on tourist land – that all delays go through the 3 + 3 model. We are going in that direction, that, depending on the events, it will be postponed for three months. In this way, personal income and everything we can solve immediately and urgently will probably be solved. So we’re sure we can cover that for the next six months. In the first place is the protection of the workforce and liquidity”Cappelli pointed out, Index.hr reports. last_img read more

Read more

Africans rush for chloroquine as virus tsunami looms

first_imgBackstreet sales Alice Desclaux, a doctor at the Institute of Development Research (IRD) in Senegal, said the risks from self-medication from chloroquine were largely rooted in illegal sales.”Chloroquine has always been on sale informally in Africa,” she said.”It’s still used to cause abortions” and even for attempted suicide, Desclaux said.In one backstreet pharmacy in Douala, Cameroon’s economic hub, the manager said he had run out of stock.For anyone who wished to order some, “careful, the price has gone up,” he said. A pill now changes hands for the equivalent of 71 US cents, four times more than a month ago.The chloroquine craze is not just affecting the black market for drugs — it is also spurring the production of counterfeit medications.Cameroon’s government has already issued a warning about fake chloroquine, samples of which have surfaced in health centers. Despite loud appeals for caution, Africans are rushing to embrace chloroquine, the venerable anti-malaria drug touted as a possible treatment for coronavirus.From hospitals in Senegal to pharmaceutical companies in South Africa and street sellers in Cameroon, chloroquine has fired hopes of a medicinal fix against a virus that is set to scythe through Africa’s poorly protected countries.Chloroquine and derivatives such as hydroxychloroquine have been used for decades as cheap and safe drugs against malaria, although their effectiveness in this field is now undermined by growing parasite resistance. Its rise stems partly from desperation, given Africa’s meager capacity to deal with a pandemic on the scale seen in Europe or the United States.Burkina Faso, Cameroon and South Africa have swiftly authorized hospitals to treat virus patients with the drugs.Around half of infected people in Senegal are already being prescribed hydroxychloroquine, Moussa Seydi, a professor at Dakar’s Fann Hospital, told AFP last Thursday.Every patient who was recommended the drug accepted it, “with no exceptions,” he said.In Democratic Republic of Congo, President Felix Tshisekedi last week declared it was “urgent” to produce chloroquine “in industrial quantities”.South Africa has already said it will join a large-scale trial, and one of the country’s biggest pharmaceutical companies has promised to donate half a million pills to the health authorities. Africa last in line? Even if the effectiveness of the drugs against coronavirus remains for now unproven, concern about securing enough of them already runs deep.Two decades ago, Africa, the continent worst hit by HIV, was last in line to get new antiretroviral AIDS drugs when the treatment emerged from the labs.”If it turns out that chloroquine is effective, Africa, which imports most of its drugs, perhaps won’t be a priority for (the pharmaceutical) industry,” said Professor Yap Boum of Epicenter Africa, the research arm of the medical charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF).France has already imposed a ban on exporting chloroquine and Morocco has requisitioned all stocks of the drug.”You won’t find any in pharmacies in Yaounde, everyone is out of stock,” Boum said, referring to the Cameroonian capital.”Local people have been buying it, apparently without prescription, which is dangerous.”The Cameroonian government has officially asked health professionals “not to yield to the desire for profit” and to avoid prescribing chloroquine preventatively.AFP correspondents report frantic demand in pharmacies in Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s economic hub, in the Angolan capital Luanda and also in Malawi — one of a handful of sub-Saharan nations where there are still no recorded cases of coronavirus.The rush is a deep source of anxiety for people with the auto-immune disease called lupus, which is also treated with chloroquine.In the Gabonese capital Libreville, Armelle Oyabi, head of an association of people with lupus, has been closely monitoring purchases at the only pharmacy left in the city that still has chloroquine.”I check that the drug is being given to people who actually need it,” she said.”If we can’t get this drug, we will not only be hit by lupus but also be more vulnerable to coronavirus.”Chloroquine has been part of the medical toolkit from before World War II — it was developed in 1934 as a synthetic derivative of quinine.center_img Small-scale tests in China and France — either unpublished or outside the rigorous framework of mainstream drug trials — suggest that chloroquine reduces virus levels in people with coronavirus.On March 24, President Donald Trump said chloroquine could be a “gift from God” — a comment that sparked strident criticism. Health watchdogs have issued calls for caution until larger clinical trials are carried out, and there have been several recorded deaths from self-medication because of toxic side effects. Despite this, in many settings across Africa, chloroquine has been placed in the front line against coronavirus. Topics :last_img read more

Read more

Mesut Ozil plotting to out-last Unai Emery at Arsenal

first_img Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 26 Oct 2019 12:38 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link10kShares Comment The German was again left out of the Arsenal squad on Thursday evening (Picture: Getty)Mesut Ozil is ready to try and wait out his Arsenal exile rather than seek a transfer away, with the German reportedly of the belief that he can out-last Unai Emery at the club.The World Cup winner has only made one appearance this season, in a 2-2 draw against Watford, and has been left out of Arsenal’s last five matchday squads entirely.It has been suggested that Emery has been unimpressed by Ozil’s work rate and performance level in training, though the Spanish coach has so far opted not to explain his decision. Ozil only has two appearances in all competitions for Arsenal this season (Picture: Getty)Asked if he would be leaving Arsenal, Ozil told The Athletic earlier this month: ‘No. I have a contract until the summer of 2021 and I will be staying until then.‘When I signed the new deal, I thought about it very carefully and said it was one of the most important decisions of my footballing career. I didn’t want to stay for just one or two more years, I wanted to commit my future to Arsenal and the club wanted me to do the same.‘You can go through difficult times, like this, but that is no reason to run away and I’m not going to. I’m here until at least 2021.’MORE: Mesut Ozil sends message to Arsenal fans after latest Unai Emery snubMore: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisementcenter_img Mesut Ozil ready to snub transfer and try to out-last Unai Emery at Arsenal Things looked a little tense between Emery and Ozil in training this week (Picture: Getty)Asked by Sky Sports why he is not selecting Ozil, Emery responded bluntly: ‘I think this is not the moment to speak about him.’AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTWith Ozil out of the squad, Arsenal have struggled to create chances and look blunt in attack, with a string of poor displays creating huge question marks over Emery’s future.And according to Bleacher Report, Ozil is prepared to ‘bide his time’ and see whether Emery looks likely to be given a third season at the Emirates before making a decision on his own future.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityOzil is said to be ‘perplexed’ at the way he has been frozen out and there is a suggestion that the Gunners are trying to force out their highest earner, but he feels there is a chance Emery will be gone before he is.The 31-year-old, who takes home around £350,000-a-week, is still enjoying playing for Arsenal and recognises that there are few options available to him should he look to leave. Advertisementlast_img read more

Read more

Robin van Persie compares ‘world-class’ Bukayo Saka to Arsenal and Manchester United legends

first_imgSaka’s perfect pass created Alexandre Lacazette’s decisive goal (Picture: Getty)‘Ryan Giggs used to give those passes, Dennis Bergkamp, Paul Scholes,’ said Van Persie on BT Sport after the game.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘This is like ordering your striker to move into the danger zone. It’s actually world-class. Really, really good.‘This is not simple. This is very good, world-class. He makes it look easy but this pass, like I said, only the great players can give those passes.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘Most crosses there would be kicked away by the defender and would be shot too high or too low with no idea.‘But this is a pass with an idea. This is a pass with a message, and that is what you want from your players.’ Metro Sport ReporterThursday 20 Feb 2020 10:32 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link4.8kShares Alex Lacazette strikes to put Arsenal ahead vs Olympiacos…Away goal bagged 🥶 pic.twitter.com/hEcB8Oq1Wl— Football on BT Sport (@btsportfootball) February 20, 2020 Advertisement Robin van Persie compares ‘world-class’ Bukayo Saka to Arsenal and Manchester United legends Advertisement Comment He continued: ‘He’s really taking his chance, and that’s nice to see from a young kid to really grab his chance and play for his future.‘And he’s doing it so well. It’s so nice to see.’Martin Keown added: ‘It’s fortunate he’s even in the team and boy he’s really taken that. Sead Kolasinac now is sitting on the bench having to watch and sort of suck it up. And that’s what you need, you take your chance and make your mark.’MORE: Arsenal invincible Robert Pires raves about ‘revelation’ Gabriel MartinelliMORE: Arsenal risk losing Bukayo Saka as contract talks hit new stumbling block The teenager gave another impressive display out of position at left-back (Picture: Getty)Robin van Persie has praised Arsenal starlet Bukayo Saka’s performance against Olympiacos in the Europa League and compared him to a trio of Manchester United and Gunners legends.The teenager, who has enjoyed a breakout campaign, assisted the only goal of the game in Arsenal’s 1-0 win in Greece on Thursday night, whipping an inch-perfect cross into the box for Alexandre Lacazette.Incredibly, that was Saka’s ninth assist of the season in all competitions and Van Persie was gushing about his vision, likening the youngster to some of the Premier League’s best ever players.last_img read more

Read more