Anderson .Paak Shares New Music Video For Kendrick Lamar Collab, “Tints” [Watch]

first_imgAt the beginning of this month, multi-talented rapper, drummer, producer, and bandleader Anderson .Paak shared a brand-new single, “Tints”, featuring his fellow Southern California-native hip-hop star/Dr. Dre protege Kendrick Lamar. The track was initially unveiled during an appearance by Anderson .Paak on Beats 1 with Zane Lowe after multiple weeks of teasing the collaboration.The track’s beat evokes the aesthetic of the golden-age, West Coast hip-hop in which both artists grew up and which .Paak kept alive on his Grammy-nominated sophomore LP, Malibu. “Tints” begs to be blasted with the windows down as you cruise down the 405—something both artists were no-doubt aware of when they cleverly made the song about needing tints on their windows to keep the paparazzi out of their business (“Bitch, I’m Kendrick Lamar. Respect me from afar”).Now, as the lead-up to .Paak’s highly-anticipated new album, Oxnard, intensifies, he has shared a new official music video for “Tints” directed by Colin Tilley. The surreal video features a number of shocking visuals of .Paak and Lamar, as well as a cameo from Dr. Dre. Mirroring the sentiments of the track, the video begins with a quote from Edgar Allen Poe: “Believe none of what you hear, and only half of what you see.”You can check out the new video below:Anderson .Paak ft. Kendrick Lamar – “Tints” [Official Music Video][Video: Anderson Paak]From various recent interviews, we know that Anderson .Paak has two different new albums on the way—one with his band, The Free Nationals, and one solo album (dubbed Oxnard, after .Paak’s hometown) executive-produced by Dr. Dre. According to the recently-leaked tracklist, we now know that “Tints” will appear on Oxnard, due out November 16th. Check out the track listing below:Anderson .Paak Oxnard Tracklisting1. “The Chase” featuring Kadhja Bonet2. “Headlow” featuring Norelle3. “Tints” featuring Kendrick Lamar4. “Who R U?”5. “Six Summers”6. “Saviers Road”7. “Smile/Petty”8. “Mansa Musa” featuring Dr. Dre and Cocoa Sarai9. “Brother’s Keeper” featuring Pusha T10. “Anywhere” featuring Snoop Dogg, The Last Artful, Dodgr11. “Trippy” featuring J. Cole12. “Cheers” featuring Q Tip13. “Sweet Chick” featuring BJ The Chicago Kid – Bonus Track14. “Left to Right” – Bonus TrackView ‘Oxnard’ TracklistingWhile Kendrick Lamar hasn’t dropped much material of “his own” since 2017’s DAMN.—aside from the soundtrack he curated for Marvel‘s Black Panther, which also featured .Paak—we’ve seen him appear as a featured artist on various recently released tracks, including his highly buzzed-about collaboration with Lil Wayne, “Mona Lisa”, on Weezy’s recently released Tha Carter V.For updates on Oxnard and more, head here.last_img read more

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John Mayer Releases Pensive New Single, “I Guess I Just Feel Like” [Listen]

first_imgToday, John Mayer has released a new studio single, “I Guess I Just Feel Like”, his first official release since his 2018 hit, “New Light“. The heartfelt new tune was initially debuted live by Mayer during an intimate solo show in Los Angeles. As On Air with Ryan Seacrest noted after the song’s October debut, Mayer mused about the differences between the new song and his most recent single release, “New Light“, which was certified as a hit record. “I am hugely indecisive and I am constantly getting my inspiration replaced … so I put out ‘New Light’ and I’m like ‘I’m gonna do a whole record like ‘New Light’ … and then I [change my mind]. … I think I’m doing songs instead of records. … I think I like to put songs out like movies, but a little faster than movies.”“There’s nothing hit-like about it,” Mayer said jokingly about the new tune, “But sometimes you just need to tell the truth with just a guitar.”“I Guess I Just Feel Like” starts out as a John Prine-like lament as Mayer sings pensively over simple acoustic strumming. The tune grows in scope from there, ending with a typically excellent electric solo from the decorated guitarist. While this may not be like his other recent work—and may not be “hit-like,” as Mayer noted—it’s undoubtedly a beautifully-constructed piece of vulnerable, sincere music that any of Mayer’s various groups of fans can appreciate. Give it a listen below:John Mayer – “I Guess I Just Feel Like”last_img read more

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An icy welcome

first_imgCoach Charley Butt has led the Harvard crew team out on the water just a handful of times this season, ramping up the team’s indoor training instead.This is not a new training strategy, but more fallout from this year’s unprecedented snowfall and cold temperatures. The Charles River — the team’s practice area — has been choked with ice.“The last time there was ice this late in the year it was 1967,” said Butt, the Bolles-Parker Head Coach for Harvard Men’s Heavyweight Crew. That year, according to weather reports, it snowed as late as April 24.Harvard’s crew season officially begins April 4 here in Cambridge against Cornell, and for the past two weeks Butt and his assistant coaches have been breaking up the ice on their stretch of the Charles.“We won’t be able to race if it’s not melted,” said Butt.Assistant coach Patrick Lapage has been leading the anti-ice efforts, which are equal parts MacGyver and winging it. Lapage ’12, a onetime government concentrator, takes a boat out with a companion, and whoever isn’t driving stands at the rear of the boat, rocking side to side to break up the ice. Creating waves helps crack it as well, he noted, as does smashing it with an oar.“It’s really kind of primitive,” he said.When it came to other outdoor sports, “keeping all of the athletic facilities open for use during the harsh winter storms was a difficult task,” said Associate Director of Athletics Tim Troville. “The athletics grounds staff worked tirelessly through each storm to prevent the cancellation of recreational activities, practices, and intercollegiate competitions. This year was more difficult than most due to the amount of snow and frequency of storms.”Harvard University crew teams have been unable to practice outside thus far this season due to icy conditions on the Charles River. This freshman team uses an indoor tank. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerCrews also worked at all hours to maintain the integrity of “the bubble.”“The bubble is the inflated structure used during the winter months in Harvard Stadium, allowing many user groups to train during inclement weather. It must be monitored around the clock during snow events to avoid snow buildup and to maintain safe egress paths. The care that the staff took to maintain the safe operation of the bubble translated to very few cancellations of scheduled activities,” Troville said.Athletics crews also instituted what’s known as the black sand approach — mounting a snow blower to a tractor and cutting walking paths into the baseball and softball fields while they were buried in snow, according to Troville.“We then spread black sand over the surface of the snow. The black sand absorbs the sun’s rays and radiates heat through the snow. We saw great results. Both fields are nearly ready for play, and we’re looking forward to hosting our first games next week.”A notice inside the Weld Boathouse. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer Saturday’s home races for men’s lightweight crew, women’s heavyweight, and women’s lightweight crew have been canceled due to icy conditions on the Charles River. Men’s heavyweight crew will compete against Cornell on April 4 at Harvard.last_img read more

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Closing the information gap

first_img The former Massachusetts governor and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney visited HLS in April for a Q&A session hosted by Dean Martha Minow. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZv-qnJWGWU” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/rZv-qnJWGWU/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Campaigning for governor of Massachusetts in 2002, Mitt Romney, J.D./M.B.A. ’75, decided he would spend one day every week doing someone else’s job. He cooked hot dogs at Fenway Park, worked at a day care center, took a turn on a paving crew. One day he hung off the back of a garbage truck making its rounds through the city of Boston.“It was really educational,” Romney said, recalling the experience for a Harvard Law School audience on Friday. “We’d pull up to a corner and there’d be people waiting to cross the street, and I’m not more than two feet from these people. And they don’t see you. You’re invisible. If you’re on a garbage truck, you’re an invisible person.“I thought, wow — we don’t see each other as we ought to in society.”The former Massachusetts governor and Republican presidential nominee, visiting Harvard Law School (HLS) for a Q&A session hosted by Dean Martha Minow, encouraged a renewed civility in politics and society, emphasizing the difference one person can make through serving others.Polarization in the country “is real and becoming worse,” Romney said. “One of the reasons for that is that we don’t get the same information. Thirty, 40 years ago, there were three networks, three news programs, and we all watched an hour of evening news. We also got our news from a certain number of newspapers … we had the same foundation in terms of information.“Today, conservatives tend to get their news from one series of sources that they tend to agree with, and liberals tend to get their news from another series of sources that they tend to agree with,” he continued. “We rarely have people with the same set of facts. That makes us become more and more polarized, because we look at others and say, ‘How in the world could you possibly think what you do? Knowing what I know, how could you think what you do?’ But they don’t know what you know, and you don’t know what they know, because you haven’t looked at the same facts.After the Q&A with Minow, Romney met with students.“I’m hopeful that people of capacity will take the time not just to read and to watch what they agree with, but to understand what they disagree with,” he said. “The more polarized we become, the more I look for the kind of person who can step forward and bring people together. There are people who say they will do that but don’t. Our country desperately needs leaders who will stand up and bring us together and find ways to bridge the gaps of understanding between people. We’ve been missing that, and we need it.”For Republicans to once more be competitive in the Northeast, he said, the party needs to do a better job of communicating why its policies are most effective at helping the poor and the middle class.“Our opposition party has done a great job of characterizing us as the party of the rich,” Romney said. “The rich will do fine whether Republicans or Democrats are presidents or governors. The rich do fine anywhere in the world. The rich take care of themselves very well. The question is, who is going to do the best job for the middle class and the poor?“The reason I ran for office — the reason I ran for governor, the reason I ran for president — is because I believed my policies and my leadership would be most likely to help people come out of poverty and most likely to help the middle class see better incomes and better outcomes. I’m convinced that conservative principles create more enterprises and more good jobs, which causes competition to hire people, which causes wages to go up. That’s why I’m a Republican. We have difficulty as a party breaking through and getting that message out.”Romney was asked by Minow if he ever draws on anything he learned at Harvard Law School.“Yes — argument,” Romney replied, to laughter from the more than 350 students in the audience in WCC Milstein East.Romney said law professors like Phillip Areeda and Stephen Breyer “would ask for you to state a case and express your opinion on an item, and inevitably they would ask, ‘Why?’ — and push you to defend your position.“I went through the joint business-law program,” he recalled. “A little saying we had was [that] you could tell the difference between law students and business students: Business students had bags under the eyes because of all the reading they had to do. Law students had furrowed brows, because of all the thinking they had to do.“I remember Professor Areeda one day was just zeroing in on me. I gave an answer and he came back and pushed against me and said, ‘Yes, but Mr. Romney, how about this and this and this?’ He kept on going and going for quite a while. … When he was finished with me, he moved on to somebody else. I went back to start writing down some notes of the interchange, and he came back and asked me what did I think about what she had said? I hadn’t paid any attention! He asked, ‘Mr. Romney, why weren’t you paying attention?’ I said I was too busy writing down what I had just said! He chuckled and moved on.“There’s no question the thinking process, the delving deeper, the pushing deeper in your analysis that is pursued here at the Law School is critical to a career in the private sector or in the public sector,” Romney said.Romney’s appearance was cosponsored by the HLS Dean’s Office, HLS Republicans, HLS Democrats, and the Harvard Federalist Society.A conversation with Mitt Romney at HLSlast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s to host student, faculty research symposium

first_imgSaint Mary’s will host the second Symposium of Research and Creative Scholarship, showcasing scholarly work of students and faculty alike from a variety of departments, Friday.Laura Williamson Ambrose, department chair of Humanistic Studies and coordinator of the event, said the event was inspired by a colloquium series where Saint Mary’s faculty members could present their research. Last year’s symposium consisted of seniors presenting their work for an hour, with a few panels focused on faculty research spread throughout the day, but Williamson Ambrose said she wanted to expand the symposium’s content to fill an entire day.“This year, what we decided to do was really expand it in scope and in scale,” she said. “We have a full day of events. … We asked for students to submit proposals as well as faculty, and we had a selection process for those proposals and created a series of interdisciplinary panels of a mixture of faculty and students throughout the day.”The symposium will have various conference portions throughout the day featuring students and faculty members from different departments and will conclude with a senior showcase and social hour. Williamson Ambrose said she hopes the event will celebrate all research conducted on campus, especially senior student research.“This kind of work, of course, has always gone on, but we realized that we need to make it more visible,” she said. “To make it more visible to the entire community and to the region, but also take an opportunity to celebrate, particularly for seniors as they prepare for their last month, or really, by that point, just a few weeks left on campus. It’s an opportunity to sort of sit back, congratulate yourself for your work and look and learn at the work of your friends and peers. You may know folks very thoroughly but not know very much about the kind of everyday scholarly interaction they have, particularly if you don’t have them in class or don’t share a major with them.”This celebration and exposure of research is one of the reasons senior psychology major Mara Egeler decided to present her studies on television as a coping mechanism at the Symposium, she said in an email.“I decided to say yes to presenting because it gives me the opportunity to educate others about my research,” Egeler said. “My project can be applied to all college students, not just those in the psychology department. I’m excited to spread my newfound information to a variety of students and faculty.”Similarly, senior music and psychology double major Franny Wall’s desire to share her research on music’s effects on dementia patients inspired her to present at the symposium, she said.“I’ve always heard great things about the symposium, and knowing that I would have a project put together that I was excited about, it greatly impacted my desire to present this year,” Wall said in an email.This symposium is not only a way for members of the community to share their findings, but it is also an opportunity for those not participating in the event to show support for their peers, Egeler said.“Everyone who is presenting at the symposium has put many hours into their projects and feels a great sense of pride about them,” she said. “We are excited to be sharing what we have learned with everyone in the Saint Mary’s community. Going to this symposium will help to show that you support all the research being conducted at Saint Mary’s. You may find new ideas in projects that you would like to further explore in your own research.”Similarly, Williamson Ambrose said she hopes the various presentations will inspire students to learn more about something that interests them or even lead them to a new path that may be seen as completely different from what interests them. She said she purposefully paired seemingly disparate disciplines to showcase the integration of learning Saint Mary’s strives to instill in its students.“There’s an integration in that way that I hope is going to be surfaced during the event itself,” Williamson Ambrose said. “In other words, we have integration that happens implicitly because of the majors and the kind of work the students do or collaborative projects between faculty and students or one another. But then we also have this in-the-moment kind of integration that can happen when sparks fly when you just put two people in a room together with two different ideas and see what happens. That’s what I’m excited to see happen on Friday.”The symposium will take place Friday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and a schedule of the symposium’s events can be found on the College’s website.Tags: academic research, department of humanistic studies, saint mary’s symposiumlast_img read more

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Court takes up capital case fee issues

first_img March 1, 2002 Regular News Court takes up capital case fee issues Court takes up capital case fee issuescenter_img Judges can increase the compensation for private “registry” attorneys who handle collateral death penalty appeals, despite a state law setting maximum compensation, the Florida Supreme Court has ruled.In a 4-3 decision released February 14, the justices upheld a circuit judge’s declaratory judgment sought by Tallahassee attorney Mark Evan Olive. But the court rejected Olive’s contention that limitations in the state contract cause ethical conflicts for registry lawyers.The dissenters from the opinion said Olive lacked standing to seek a declaratory judgment.The majority opinion, written by Justice Fred Lewis, said Olive had standing because he had met with his client and remained on the registry list of available attorneys, even though he refused to sign the state-mandated contract. Another attorney was eventually appointed to represent that client.The opinion said Olive met the standards set out in Holley v. Adams, 238 So. 2d 401 (Fla. 1970).On the compensation schedule outlined in the state contract and set by law, Olive argued by signing the agreement he was waiving any further compensation to which he might be entitled. Lewis noted in several cases the court had overruled compensation schedules if they impinged on a party’s right to counsel.In White v. Board of County Commissioners of Pinellas County, 537 So. 2d 1376 (Fla. 1989), Lewis noted the court held that, “It must be remembered that an indigent defendant’s right to competent and effective representation, not the attorney’s right to reasonable compensation, give rise to the necessity of exceeding the statutory maximum fee cap. The relationship between an attorney’s compensation and the quality of his or her representation cannot be ignored.”Counsel for the state conceded that other decisions gave the courts authority to exceed statutory schedules, Lewis wrote, and the legislative staff analysis for the bill setting the schedule also acknowledged that fact.The analysis said, “[W]here unusual or extraordinary circumstances exist, the fees caps established by [F.S.] § 27.711(f). . . and increased by the provisions of this bill, do not prevent a court from ordering payment above the maximum authorized.”Consequently, Lewis concluded that trial courts are authorized to approve fees in excess of the schedule “where extraordinary or unusual circumstances exist in capital collateral cases.” He added that does not mean extra fees are justified in every case or will automatically be awarded when requested.The justices rejected Olive’s contention the statutorily-mandated contract caused ethical violations by preventing frivolous or repetitive motions, that prohibiting registry attorneys from filing civil actions in federal court was unconstitutional, and that contract provisions dealing with records could make client confidences part of the public record.Lewis said lawyers already have ethical obligations against frivolous or repetitive motions and noted that the court has upheld the statutory prohibition for the state’s Capital Collateral Regional Counsels from filing civil actions in federal courts. As for the records, he said the contract clearly specifies that only information already public under F.S. Chap. 119 is covered, not confidential work product or attorney-client matters.Justices Leander Shaw, Jr., Harry Lee Anstead, and Barbara Pariente concurred with Lewis. Justice Major Harding wrote a dissent, in which Chief Justice Charles Wells and Justice Peggy Quince concurred.Harding argued since Olive never signed the contract and didn’t provide any evidence that he performed any work beyond meeting with his potential client, he lacked the standing to seek a declaratory judgment. Had he signed the contract, done the representation, and then presented evidence the compensation was inadequate, standing would have been there, Harding said.The majority’s action, he said, constituted issuing an advisory opinion in a case where it had no authority to do so. “In sum, Olive had no contractual right then in doubt and no legal relationship that was affected by sections 27.710 and 27.711,” Harding wrote. “Although Olive argued below that he was entitled to bring a declaratory judgment action because the rights at issue would arise in the future, that is not so; that could not arise if he never signed a contract and never represented a capital defendant.”Sen. Locke Burt, R-Ormond Beach, who sponsored the bill that created the registry and who chairs the state commission that oversees that and other death appeal issues, said he was pleased the court upheld the fee statute, adding most of the cases so far have come in well below the caps.“I think that’s very positive. The registry attorneys have become a significant part of the collateral process,” Burt said. “I think that the discussion about fee caps simply reaffirmed the line of Florida cases going back to 1986, which said if there are unusual and extraordinary circumstances, then you can get more money. I think they specifically stated a death penalty case wasn’t in of itself particularly unique, extraordinary or unusual.”The ruling came in Olive v. Maas, case no. SC00-317.last_img read more

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How school counselors are keeping strong connections with students in pandemic

first_img“Teachers will let us know who they haven’t heard from, what students haven’t been signing in or checking in, and we’ve been going above and beyond trying to do that along with our administrators making sure someone heard from those folks,” said Ruhm. “We’re isolated and I think not feeling isolated is really important,” said Ruhm. Ruhm says some of her students feel more comfortable talking through video chat about their concerns. However, she says it’s been a challenge with some other students who may feel a little less comfortable speaking through video chat while at home. School counselors across many districts say they have been adjusting to the recent changes and have been making sure students know they are there for them. So, she makes sure she does the small things like send them emails to let them know she is there for them with the resources they need. For more information on resources for families and children, click here. Therefore, Ruhm and her colleagues went above and beyond for their students. Not only making sure kids have access to Zoom, but also doing things like sending birthday cards and letters. In addition, they pay close attention to students who may need some extra help. (WBNG) — While students are home from school for the rest of the academic year, school counselors say it’s important now more than ever to make sure kids have resources they need. For Rhonda Ruhm, a school counselor in the Vestal School District and Tioga Hills Elementary, she says she wanted to make sure her students didn’t feel alone.last_img read more

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Late 2020 without a visa and double taxation with the US?

first_imgEven the European Commission threatened the USA that it would introduce visas for citizens of the USA and Canada, but the EC still gave up on that move. The Holy Grail and the only solution to this story is for the percentage of rejected visa applications to be less than three percent. And according to the information from the American Embassy, ​​Croatia is very close to fulfilling that. Ivan Barbarić, Vice President of the Croatian Chamber of Commerce for International Affairs and the EU, pointed out: “The United States is the world’s leading economic power and the largest global importer. Their GDP in 2018 exceeded 21 trillion dollars. In comparison, the value of Croatian trade with the United States, which amounted to 620 million dollars last year, is literally a drop in the ocean. The good thing is that out of those 620 million, over 400 are Croatian exports to the United States. In the first half of this year, our exports to America increased by 25 percent compared to the same period last year. These are not big numbers in total, but the positive trend is certainly gratifying”. But he stressed that the biggest obstacles to the faster development of economic relations between the United States and Croatia – visa regime and double taxation. US Ambassador to Croatia Robert Kohorst; Source: HGK They also discussed the US tax system, which was presented in more detail by Goran Križanac from KMPG. “You have corporate taxes at the federal level, but also at the level of each state. Dividends for non-tax residents are taxed at a rate of 30 percent, which creates problems for Croatian companies. This is a high rate, and if we had an agreement on avoiding double taxation, it would be between 10 and 15 percent. This certainly hinders Croatian investments in the United States”, Križanac emphasized, noting that contributions for pension and health insurance are significantly lower in the USA than in Croatia. He advised entrepreneurs to definitely turn to local tax experts to avoid additional costs in doing business.   Goran Križanac, KMPG: Dividends for tax non-residents are taxed at a rate of 30 percent and this creates problems for Croatian companies. The American Chamber of Commerce in Croatia, in cooperation with the Croatian Chamber of Commerce and the Avitus Group, organized the “America Made Easy” event where Croatian companies could learn more about the ways in which they can enter the United States market. There is no better way to test your business idea than entering the US market, said Andrea Doko Jelusic, CEO of AmCham. “It is a large and potent market, but it is also specific, with numerous requirements. Several Croatian companies are already operating quite successfully in the USA, and today we will show what is important for others to successfully cross the Atlantic.”, Said Doko Jelusic. Two painful topics and the main brakes that have been discussed for years and a positive outcome is expected. But we can’t wait for that either. It is important to emphasize that Croatia with Bulgaria, Romania and Cyprus are the only remaining EU members that do not enjoy the principle of reciprocity between the EU and the US, which certainly leads to unequal relations. IMPORTANT INFO FOR TOURIST EMPLOYEES TARGETING THE MARKET NOW.IN 1783, THE REPUBLIC OF DUBROVNIK WAS THE FIRST STATE IN THE WORLD TO RECOGNIZE THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. US Ambassador to Croatia Robert Kohorst also referred to these problems, saying that the US Government has a special team that is preparing agreements on the abolition of double taxation with countries around the world, including Croatia: “Our administration is primarily focused on large countries, but we are systematically trying to encourage our Ministry of Finance to move Croatia to the list of priorities. It is good that the agreement with Croatia does not require any special preparations, but can be based on agreements with other EU member states. As far as visas are concerned, Croatia should fall below 3 percent of rejected applications, and at the moment you are very close to that figure and I think it is only a matter of time before it is abolished, perhaps by the end of 2020”, Said the Cohort. Robert Kohorst, US Ambassador to Croatia: It is only a matter of time before visas are abolished, perhaps by the end of 2020 Frank Levene from Avitus presented the cultural differences that business people expect “across the pond”. “You need to look American, have an American cell phone number, a web address ending in .com, know the imperial system of measures. Don’t focus solely on big cities because they are expensive and the competition is relentless, the US is a huge country and offers many opportunities even in less famous places”, Explained Levene.last_img read more

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Kevin Gregg

first_imgKevin Gregg is a relief pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds.  He was signed as a free agent before Spring Training.  Gregg did not pitch last year because of arm problems.  Before that, he saved 33 games for the Chicago Cubs.  The Cincinnati Reds plan for him to be their 8th inning pitcher to get the game to Chapman, their star relief pitcher.  It didn’t quite work that way on Opening Day.When Gregg entered the game, Cueto was on his way to an Opening Day shutout win.  The Reds were ahead 2-0 when Gregg was summoned into the game.  Pittsburgh treated him as if he were a batting practice pitcher.  Despite super defense by the Reds, the Pirates still scored 2 runs and tied the game.  Fortunately, Todd Frazier hit a 3-run homer in the bottom of the inning to win the game.  Chapman finished the game in style in the top of the 9th.The Reds say that they still hope Gregg can be their 8th inning setup man.last_img read more

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St. Nick Sweeps Batesville In Volleyball

first_imgSt. Nicholas 7th and 8th grade teams hosted the Batesville Bulldogs at Milan Elementary on Sept. 3 and both St. Nick teams came up with the wins for the matches. It was an exciting night of volleyball, and St. Nicholas had plenty of fans there to support their efforts and show their school spirit.For the 7th grade match, St. Nicholas won in 3 sets with scores of 23-25, 25-13, and 15-5. Set 1 was point for point and close the whole time. St. Nicholas came out to take set 2 and 3 convincingly by playing as a team.Ella Fledderman had an amazing night serving by going 24/25 with 3 Aces. Jessica Rees was perfect with 15/15 and 2 Aces; Taylor Whitehead went 7/7 with 3 Aces, and Katie Johnson went 9/11 with 1 Ace.For Batesville, Laine Struewing and Kylie Laker each had 6 service points including an ace.The 8th grade team won in 2 sets with scores of 25-15 and 25-15.The girls served aggressively and with consistency. Molly Gregg anchored the team in serving and went 25/26 with 15 Aces; Katelynn Bischoff served 8/9 and Ella Fledderman served 6/6. St. Nicholas set the ball up well throughout the match which lead to all girls being able to attack the ball.For Batesville, Kari Reer was perfect on all 9 ofher serves earning 7 points including an ace. Macy Prickel had 3 kills at the net.St. Nicholas will be back in action next week with South Ripley, South Dearborn, and St. Louis.  Batesville will play at home vs. North Decatur on Tuesday.Courtesy of STN Coach Debbie Gregg and Bulldogs Coach Shelly Prickel.last_img read more

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