Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) HY2013 Interim Report

first_imgUganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) listed on the Uganda Securities Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2013 interim results for the half year.For more information about Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug)  2013 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileUganda Clays Limited manufactures and markets clay products for the building and construction industry in Uganda. Its product offering ranges from roofing tiles, bricks and floor tiles to decorative grilles, ventilators, pipes and suspended floor units and partition blocks. The company supplies the local building trade in Uganda and exports products to Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, the DRC and South Sudan. Uganda Clays Limited was founded in 1950 and its head office is in Kampala, Uganda. Uganda Clays Limited is listed on the Uganda Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Teachers encouraged to apply for up to $20,000 in grant funding

first_img TAGSSt. Johns River Water Management District Previous articleCentral Florida Democrat Murphy and Republican co-sponsor childcare billNext articleNo friend of change? It’s not looking for friends Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. The St. Johns River Water Management District is accepting applications for its Blue School Grant Program. In its second year, the educational grant program offers up to a total of $20,000 for teachers working to promote water resource protection through hands-on learning opportunities.“The district has a strong commitment to educating the next generation and their families about the value of water, and we’re pleased to be able to offer the Blue School Grant Program to enhance the work of district staff and our region’s teachers to care for Florida’s water resources,” said St. Johns River Water Management District Executive Director Dr. Ann Shortelle. “We’re sure to see some interesting learning experiences for these teachers’ students.”Grants of up to $2,000 per teacher per school are available to teachers in four areas: water quality field study, water conservation garden project, classroom/community awareness, and freshwater resources educational program.Middle and high school teachers at public and charter schools within the district’s 18-county service area are eligible to apply.The deadline to apply is Aug. 31, 2017. Teachers receiving grants will be notified by Sept. 15 and funds will be available this October.Information about criteria and deadlines, and the online application can be found at www.sjrwmd.com/education/blueschool.About the St. Johns River Water Management DistrictSt. Johns River Water Management District staff are committed to ensuring the sustainable use and protection of water resources for the benefit of the people of the district and the state of Florida. The St. Johns River Water Management District is one of five districts in Florida managing groundwater and surface water supplies in the state. The district encompasses all or part of 18 northeast and east-central Florida counties. District headquarters are in Palatka, and staff also are available to serve the public at service centers in Maitland, Jacksonville and Palm Bay.Connect with us on Twitter at @SJRWMD, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. For more information about the district, please visit www.sjrwmd.com. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

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Villa V / Martens Van Caimere

first_imgArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/958815/villa-v-martens-van-caimere Clipboard “COPY” Villa V / Martens Van Caimere Villa V / Martens Van CaimereSave this projectSaveVilla V / Martens Van Caimere CopyHouses•Frasnes-lez-Anvaing, Belgium Save this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet Home+ 46Curated by Paula Pintos Share Belgium 2020 Architects: Martens Van Caimere Architecten Area Area of this architecture project Projectscenter_img “COPY” Year:  Houses Manufacturers: WienerbergerPrincipal Designer:Nikolaas Martens, Robbe Van CaimereStructural Engineer:Declerck & PartnersSustainability Consultants:Martens Van Caimere ArchitectenCity:Frasnes-lez-AnvaingCountry:BelgiumMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeRecommended ProductsWindowsFAKRORoof Windows – FPP-V preSelect MAXWindowsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Unit-Glaze SystemWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityDoorsSaliceSliding Door System – Slider S20Text description provided by the architects. In Frasnes-lez-Buissenal, a village situated in the hills and protected landscape of Pays De Collines, we designed Villa V. The villa`s layout is L-shaped, mimicking the layout of a farmhouse that once stood on the site.Save this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeSave this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeWithin the L-shaped layout, the program is organized on one floor as a continuation of closed rooms and open areas. One leg of the L-shape sits inside the hill and contains the private areas: bedroom, bathroom, and study. The other leg contains the living quarters and hovers above the hill, overlooking the impressive landscape and winery.Save this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeSave this picture!Plan – Ground floorSave this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeLooking from the top of the hill called ‘Dieu des Monts (God of the hills)’, to the valley, the villa with its green rooftop blends in with the surrounding landscape. Looking from the valley up to the villa, it seems to detach from the hill, hovering. Save this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeThe villa was constructed using in situ casted concrete, defining its strong visual appeal into an uncompromised concrete sculpture. The concrete establishes an interior canvas for the villa and functions as a minimalistic backdrop for the modernistic art and furniture collection of the clients. Techniques are kept visible throughout the project, accepting their necessity and exploiting their visual industrial quality.Save this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeFrom the outside, following the strict material regulations of the protected landscape, the villa is covered in red brickwork. A material commonly used in Pays De Collines. Maximizing the view to the ever-changing surrounding, the sculpture was perforated with curtain walls, constructed from wood and glass. They make the strict rhythm the villa was designed with, readable from the inside out for the clients and outside in for the people passing by.Save this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeThis readability and architectural language are further established by the two cantilevered rooftops (one serving as a covered entrance, the other as a covered terrace) ending the L-shaped villa with a strong gesture.Save this picture!© Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet HomeProject gallerySee allShow lessKate Wagner: “The Age of the Architecture Critic as Galvanizing Force Is Over. It’s …ArticlesBun Milan Restaurant / MasquespacioSelected Projects Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/958815/villa-v-martens-van-caimere Clipboard Photographs Photographs:  Nick Cannaerts / Home Sweet Home Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project CopyAbout this officeMartens Van Caimere ArchitectenOfficeFollowProductsConcreteBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesOn FacebookFrasnes-lez-AnvaingBelgiumPublished on March 19, 2021Cite: “Villa V / Martens Van Caimere” 19 Mar 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardMetallicsHAVER & BOECKERArchitectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsSealantsEffisusGutter Repair – TiteGutter3Aluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Click-on BattensTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea PrestigeMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Click Roll CapsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteTerrealTerracotta Cladding TileDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE UnilateralWindowsJoskoWindows and Sliding Doors – ONE SeriesMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Area:  397 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project last_img read more

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Sales of Precision Farm Services Expected to Slow

first_img By Hoosier Ag Today – Aug 14, 2016 SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Previous articlePostcards from the Indiana State FairNext articleAgricultural Innovation Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Hoosier Ag Today Home Indiana Agriculture News Sales of Precision Farm Services Expected to Slow Following the downturn in the agriculture economy, a majority of precision farm equipment dealers expects sales to slow. Only 40 percent of dealers expect some growth in their precision farming sales due to the continuing headwinds in agriculture. Still, precision farm equipment dealers remain optimistic. A benchmark study found only 21.1 percent of dealers expect any fall off in revenue, a considerable improvement from last year’s results when 35.5 percent of dealers predicted declining revenues.The percentage of dealers reporting declines of 7 percent or less in 2015 revenue was about 2 percent less than forecast in last year’s benchmark study. When it comes to predicting strong growth, however, fewer dealers expect a significant gain in sales dollars in the precision segment of their business. The survey shows just 1 in 10 dealers are projecting revenue increases of over 8 percent for this year.Source: NAFB News Service SHARE Sales of Precision Farm Services Expected to Slowlast_img read more

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Second journalist in a month arrested

first_img News News Yemeni journalist killed, nine wounded in Aden airport explosions News YemenMiddle East – North Africa to go further RSF_en February 11, 2021 Find out more YemenMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts Organisation center_img Fixer for foreign reporters held in Aden for past five months United Nations: press freedom situation “deeply worrying” in Yemen, according to RSF News Follow the news on Yemen Help by sharing this information June 26, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Second journalist in a month arrested   Reporters Without Borders called today for the immediate release of Yemeni journalist Ibrahim Hussen, arrested on 21 June by the country’s secret police after criticising the government.”Once again, the Yemeni authorities are using strong-arm tactics to intimidate the opposition press, especially when they denounce corruption,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard in a letter to interior minister Rashad al-Alimi. “This is the second journalist arrested in Yemen in the past month.”Ménard also called for the release of journalist Abdulrahmin Mohsen, of the daily Al-Thawri, organ of the Socialist Party, who was arrested on 28 May. He noted that three journalists had been arrested in Yemen over the past year. Hussen, who worked for several local publications, including Al-Thawri, was arrested in Sanaa by plainclothes police at the offices of the opposition Yemeni Unionist Party (an alliance between the Socialist and Communist parties). The weekly Yemen Times said he was forcibly taken to secret police headquarters.His arrest may be linked with articles he has written criticising a government report on human rights and accusing the authorities of corruption. Officials refused to comment on his arrest.Hussen, along with Mohsen and Khaled Salman, Al-Thawri’s managing editor, were convicted on 4 June of “religious sedition” and “harming national unity” and given five-month suspended prison sentences, as a result of articles the paper published last February. The three men had appealed against the conviction.The interior ministry has refused to give any details about where Mohsen is being held or why. He is thought to have been arrested for writing articles about government corruption, human rights violations and the wave of arrests in Yemen after the 11 September attacks in the United States. February 26, 2021 Find out more January 6, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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La Salle High School Welcomes New Faculty, Honors Long-Standing Service

first_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it La Salle High School recently held their Service Awards Convocation on October 16, 2012. The event welcomed new employees and honored employees who have completed twenty, fifteen, ten and five years of service.Dr. Richard Gray, La Salle President and the principal, Brother Christopher Brady, FSC were on hand to present the awards to their distinguished recipients.Service Awards Recipients:Twenty YearsRodolfo RodriguezFifteen YearsJane OsickRobert C. PackardPaula MooreTen YearsJohn C. Blackstock ’67Susan E. Keens PhD.Anthony FernandesSusan HarrisonJennifer RochaJude Lucas-RynersonFive YearsBrandon Birr ’03Monique Gougeon ’03Rand LairdLisa SchulmanLudwig VazquezNew EmployeesBrother Christopher Brady, FSCRussell Gordon center column 2 La Salle High School Welcomes New Faculty, Honors Long-Standing Service From STAFF REPORTS, PHOTO DAVID ALVARADO Published on Saturday, October 20, 2012 | 12:39 pm Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes More Cool Stuffcenter_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Subscribe First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News HerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like A Bombshell And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Is What Happens To Your Face After DermaplaningHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAt 9 Years Old, This Young Girl Dazzled The World Of FashionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Signs That Your Ex May Still Want You BackHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Global Digital Potentiometer Market (2021 to 2026) – Growth, Trends, COVID-19 Impact, and Forecasts…

first_imgDUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 22, 2021– The “Digital Potentiometer Market – Growth, Trends, COVID-19 Impact, and Forecasts (2021 – 2026)” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering. The Digital Potentiometer market was valued at USD 320 million in 2020, a CAGR of 4.2% over the forecast period (2021 – 2026). Companies MentionedAnalog Devices Inc.Microchip Technology Inc.Texas Instruments Inc.Renesas Electronics CorporationParallax Inc.Maxim IntegratedON Semiconductor (Semiconductor Components Industries LLC)VSI Electronics Pvt Ltd.Nidec Copal Electronics Inc. Key Market Trends Automotive is Expected to Hold a Significant ShareIn the automotive sector, a digital potentiometer is used in the engine control unit, actuator control, actuator controls, instrumentation controls, and navigation/entertainment display adjustments. The automotive industry has grown significantly in the past years, aided by the growth in unit volumes and the emergence of high innovation companies. According to Scotiabank, the automotive sector expects to sell around 77 million automobiles by the end of 2019. Owing to the increasing purchase of cars across the world, the demand for digital potentiometer is likely to increase over the forecast period.Along with the factors above, increasing adoption of electric vehicles is also favoring the market growth. An electric car comprises of a motor that needs a controller and battery pack to run. The controller shifts electrical power in pulses from the batteries to the motor. The amount of power to transfer is directed to the controller by a pair of potentiometers attached to the gas pedal. These cars have two potentiometers for safety purposes. The controller checks whether the readings from both the potentiometers are the same. If they are not equal, the controller will not operate. This is designed to avoid situations where one potentiometer might be faulty and could send a signal for the power transfer which is not necessary. Asia-Pacific is Expected to Experience Rapid GrowthAsia-Pacific is expected to experience rapid growth in the market, owing to the established electronics industry, in the region. The increased adoption of smartphones, computers, and vehicle automation are the prime factors driving the growth of the Asia-Pacific segment. Increasing smartphone adoption rates have made the region, one of the largest mobile markets in the world. As per the GSMA, in 2018, 2.8 billion people in the region subscribed to mobile services and it is expected by 2025, 370 million new mobile subscribers will be added. With the rising demand for such devices, the demand for LCDs is expected to increase, thereby, influencing the digital potentiometer market in the region.Another driving force is the growth of the automotive sector in this region. In Asia-Pacific, major motor vehicle production plants are in China, India, Japan, and South Korea. As per the OICA (International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers), in 2018, around 3.7 million passenger vehicles were produced in South Korea.The growing government regulations in favor of electric vehicles market is also a significant factor for market growth over the forecast period. For instance in India, the NITI Aayog action plan for Clean Transportation released in 2018 has already recommended eliminating all permit requirements for EVs to encourage electric mobility. Key Topics Covered: 1 INTRODUCTION 2 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 MARKET DYNAMICS 4.1 Market Overview 4.1.1 Low Vulnerable to Physical Tampering 4.2 Market Restraints 4.2.1 Technical Limitations 4.3 Industry Attractiveness – Porter’s Five Force Analysis 4.4 Technology Snapshot (Programmable and Non Programmable Potentiometer) 5 MARKET SEGMENTATION 5.1 By Application 5.1.1 Automotive 5.1.2 Industrial and Instrumentation 5.1.3 Consumer Electronics 5.1.4 IT and RF Communication 5.1.5 Other Applications 5.2 Geography 5.2.1 North America 5.2.2 Europe 5.2.3 Asia Pacific 5.2.4 Rest of the World 6 COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE 6.1 Company Profiles 7 MARKET OPPORTUNITIES AND FUTURE TRENDS 8 INVESTMENT ANALYSIS For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/wr2o1b View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210222005575/en/ CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager [email protected] For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 KEYWORD: INDUSTRY KEYWORD: AUTOMOTIVE GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY OTHER AUTOMOTIVE ALTERNATIVE VEHICLES/FUELS HARDWARE SOURCE: Research and Markets Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/22/2021 09:40 AM/DISC: 02/22/2021 09:40 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210222005575/enCopyright Business Wire 2021. Previous articleIn Israel and beyond, virus vaccines bring political powerNext articleJuniper Research: Smart Traffic Management to Significantly Reduce Congestion and Emissions; Saving Cities $277 Billion by 2025 Digital AIM Web Support Local NewsBusiness WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 22, 2021 center_img Twitter Facebook TAGS  Pinterest Twitter Global Digital Potentiometer Market (2021 to 2026) – Growth, Trends, COVID-19 Impact, and Forecasts – ResearchAndMarkets.comlast_img read more

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Section 34 Arbitration And Conciliation Act, 1996- Time For A Rethink

first_imgColumnsSection 34 Arbitration And Conciliation Act, 1996- Time For A Rethink Rana Mukherjee, Shantanu Singh & Aakanksha Bhardwaj14 May 2020 7:16 AMShare This – xThe concept of arbitration/alternative dispute resolution has been prevalent in the Indian subcontinent right from ancient times. The panchayat system of resolving disputes was a unique form prevalent in the subcontinent on lines of personalised resolution of disputes at the lowest level. With the advent of British rule in India, a more codified form of judicial system came into…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe concept of arbitration/alternative dispute resolution has been prevalent in the Indian subcontinent right from ancient times. The panchayat system of resolving disputes was a unique form prevalent in the subcontinent on lines of personalised resolution of disputes at the lowest level. With the advent of British rule in India, a more codified form of judicial system came into being. This also included arbitration as an alternative to the usual civil remedies to provide for a less time-consuming, less acrimonious and more efficacious mode of resolving disputes (which was more towards the nature of mediation). After numerous regulations introduced by the British East India Company to provide for arbitration- as the first serious attempt for encouraging arbitration in the Indian sub-continent, Act IX of 1840 was promulgated. This was followed by multiple acts culminating finally in the Arbitration Act of 1940 (primarily based on the English Arbitration Act of 1934). The failure of the Act of 1940 to prove itself as an effective alternative to the ordinary court proceedings were with consternation and dismay noted as far back as in 1982 in a judgement by the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India. In Guru Nanak Foundation vs Rattan Singh & Sons,[1] the Court stated: “Interminable, time consuming, complex and expensive court procedures impelled jurists to search for an alternative forum, less expensive, less formal, more effective and speedy resolution of disputes avoiding procedural claptrap and this led them to Arbitration Act of 1940. However, the way in which the proceedings under the Act are conducted and without an exception challenged in courts, has made lawyers laugh and legal philosophers weep. Experience shows and law reports bear ample testimony that the proceedings under the Act have become highly technical accompanied by unending prolixity, at every stage providing a legal trap to the unwary. Informal forum chosen by the parties for expeditious disposal of their disputes has by the decisions of the Courts been clothed with ‘legalese’ of unforeseeable complexity”. Despite such criticisms, no improvement in the law was made for nearly half a century domestically, even though internationally, the (UNICITRAL) Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration, 1985, was adopted by the United Nation Commission on International Trade law and had in turn been adopted by numerous countries across the globe too. It was finally, post liberalisation in 1991, that India, taking a cue from the Britain, adopted the UNICITRAL model Law and enacted the “Arbitration and Conciliation, Act, 1996 (hereinafter “1996 Act”). As opposed to the Arbitration Act of 1940 which only covered domestic awards, the 1996 Act covered both domestic and international arbitration and was essentially aimed at curbing delays and court interference in the arbitration process. However, despite the best efforts of the legislature to make India a robust hub of arbitration, the 1996 Act suffered from various problems including high costs and too much intervention of Courts which in turn led to excessive delays on account of incorrect judicial interpretations and legislative lacunas. While most of these problems have been addressed by way of subsequent judicial pronouncements and legislative amendments, several inconsistencies in India’s arbitration framework still remain unaddressed and invariably perpetuate the problem of excessive court interference and delays, specifically in relation to enforcement of awards. The Problem Court interference in arbitration process usually arises after the proceedings are over. While it is true that even during the pendency of arbitration proceedings, court interference is highly prevalent due to Section 9 applications, we will be restricting our analysis to the problem of court interference while enforcing awards, which means, our analysis is restricted to Section 34 to 38 of the Arbitration Act. Section 34 of the 1996 Act is in consonance with Article 34 of the UNCITRAL Model Law and also with Section 30 of the Arbitration Act, 1940. While the basis on which an Award can be challenged under Section 34 are limited, the term “Public Policy of India” has been a subject of widespread debate and incorrect judicial interpretations have often led to unwarranted court intervention. Decisions such as ONGC Limited v Sawpipes[2] and other judgments, including Associate Builders v. Delhi Development Authority[3] and ONGC v. Western Geco International Ltd.[4] led to an expansive definition of public policy which virtually enabled courts to entertain any and every challenge based on ‘public policy’. Accompanied with this, the Arbitration Act,1996 suffered from the automatic stay of awards if a challenge had been filed for the same under Section 34. As a result, virtually all awards were challenged before the court and any requisite payments to be made as per the award were consequently stayed even on merely the issuance of notice by the court and deprived the award holder of the payment due. 2015 Amendment These issues were finally addressed in the Law Commission of India’s 246th Report which was published on 05.08.2014. The Commission noted that several modifications were needed to Section 34 to 38 of the Act to help speed up the process and accordingly suggested a slew of amendments- including for the provision of stay under Section 34 by doing away with the regime of automatic stays. Moreover, the Commission suggested the introduction of timelines within which arbitration proceedings were to be concluded. However, before the Report could be acted upon, the Commission was constrained to prepare a supplementary Report to its 246th Report in view of the judgement of the Supreme Court in Western Geco. The Supplementary Report noted with consternation that the Western Geco judgment was in a way undermining the Commission’s attempts of bringing the Act in line with the international practices. In its opinion, it would discourage the possibility of international arbitration coming to, and domestic arbitration staying in India, owing to the overly expansive interpretation of the term ‘public policy of India’ but concluded that a narrower meaning of the term ‘public policy’ would sub serve the very purpose for which the Act had been enacted. Following their proposals, and after receiving three draft proposals for amendment, India’s arbitration law was amended two decades later, with the Arbitration and Conciliation (Amendment) Act, 2015 (the 2015 Amendments) being enacted. The 2015 Amendments came into effect from October 23, 2015 and demonstrated a marked preference for institutionalising the process of arbitration by making special allowances for the same. The 2015 Amendments included provisions, such as introduction of different and shortened timelines to speed up the arbitral process, and some clarifications with respect to the oft used and much abused public policy challenge to arbitral awards. Pointer to expeditious disposal and the concept of lesser delays can be found from the introduced Section 29A, 29B and Section 34(6). With regards to the issue of automatic stay, 2015 Amendments provided that an automatic stay shall not be granted on the award merely upon the filing of a Section 34 challenge. While the 2015 Amendments were introduced with the best of intentions, it was unclear if the amended provisions were applicable to arbitrations and court proceedings which commenced after 23 October 2015. Several High Courts delivered contradictory interpretations of Section 26 of the 2015 Amendments. The ambiguity around interpretations of Section 26 of the 2015 Amendment Act was finally settled by the Supreme Court in BCCI v Kochi Cricket Pvt. Ltd.,[5] The Apex Court distinguished (i) arbitral proceedings from (ii) proceedings in relation to arbitral proceedings, that is, arbitration related court proceedings. It was held that amendments are applicable to all arbitral proceedings initiated after the Amendment Act 2015 came into force. Likewise, it was equally applicable to court proceedings initiated after the commencement of the Act, regardless of the fact that they might stem-out of arbitrations initiated before the commencement date, thereby giving the amendment retrospective effect. The instant judgment coupled with the Hon’ble Supreme Court’s judgment in State of Bihar & Ors. v Bihar Rajya Bhoomi Vikas Bank Samiti[6], is a pointer to the fact that the Hon’ble Supreme Court’s primary concern has been to curtail frivolous challenges to arbitral awards, thereby minimising court interference and the associated delays. Soon thereafter, the Parliament passed the Arbitration and Conciliation (Amendment) Act, 2019. In order to settle the issue of applicability of the 2015 Amendments, the 2019 Amendments introduced a new Section 87 to the Arbitration Act. Contrary to the Supreme Court’s observations in BCCI, Section 87 provided that the 2015 Amendments will be applicable only to the court proceedings which relate to arbitrations commenced after the commencement of Amendment Act 2015 and not arbitration proceedings which were initiated prior to the commencement of the Act, thereby taking away the retrospective application of the act. However, Section 87 has been subsequently struck down by the Apex Court in Hindustan Construction Company v. Union of India[7] and the position of law has been reverted back to what it was in BCCI v Kochi Cricket. The Hon’ble Supreme Court has consistently expressed dismay over the delays in arbitration cases, mostly at the post award stage and therefore, struck down Section 87, as introduced by the Amendment Act of 2019 as manifestly arbitrary. The extent of delay becomes wholly apparent when one looks at the case NAFED v. Alimenta,[8] which the Supreme Court finally decided in 2020, nearly after 37 years since its inception. The Un-addressed Problem While both Courts and the legislatures have undertaken painstaking efforts to curb the problem of delays through minimising court interference, a pivotal point has often been ignored which stems from Section 37(1)(b) of the Arbitration Act. Section 37 provides for appealable orders which inter-alia also includes appeal against setting aside or refusing to set aside an arbitral award under Section 34 and the appellate court is be the one authorised by law to hear appeals from original decree of the Court (emphasis supplied). As a result, an arbitral award keeps getting entangled in litigations which acts as an impediment. In general, an arbitral award stays tied up in litigation processes for almost 5-6 years at the bare minimum, owing to the challenges against any order under Section 34 and the subsequent statutory appeal under Section 37 against Order 34. In such a situation, the author(s) strongly feel that the jurisdiction of Courts need to be further curtailed in relation to Section 37(1)(b) in order to free an award of unnecessary statutory challenges which can very well be avoided. Arbitral awards are to be treated as a decree for execution purposes under the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 by way of deeming fiction.[9] The author(s) feel that the legislature would be well advised to treat the challenge to an arbitral award under Section 34 to be one akin to the challenge under Section 96 read with Order XLI of the Civil Procedure Code, 1908, as if the same were an appeal from a decree of court, but within the parameters of Section 34 as they have come to exist subsequent to the aforementioned legislative and judicial decisions. This would afford any decision rendered under Section 34 more legitimacy as an ‘appeal’ and also restrict the scope for the ‘second appeal’, as opposed to Section 34 being treated as an original application. In fact, these appeals can be treated similar to the first appeals under Section 104 of the Civil Procedure Code, 1908 read with Order XLIII of the same. It is also imperative to restrict the appealability of a Section 34 order, under Section 37 (1)(c) of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996, to merely pure questions of law, as can be found under Section 69 of the English Arbitration Act of 1996, which can be admitted only upon seeking leave of the court. Section 69 of the English Act permits a limited right to appeal on points of law and statistics of the Departmental Advisory Committee highlight that the provision is able to meet its policy aims well. As per the authors’ humble opinion, Section 34 should provide for an appeal against an arbitral award, in line with Order XLI of Civil Procedure Code, 1908, while keeping Section 34(6) intact and without any further recourse to a statutory ‘Second Appeal’ under Section 37 of the Arbitration Act, 1996. However, for such a process to work efficaciously, the legal system must ensure better training of the judiciary for arbitration law specifically so as to ensure that the Section 34 order so rendered doesn’t suffer from infirmities which would render it susceptible to further judicial challenges. The author(s) strongly feel that the aforementioned would hasten the culmination of arbitration proceedings within a designed timeframe thereby restricting and limiting court interference post award, in line with the concept of arbitration as an effective and efficacious alternate dispute resolution mechanism. Mr. Rana Mukherjee is Senior Advocate at the Supreme Court of India, Mr. Shantanu Singh is Advocate at Delhi High Court and Aakanksha Bhardwaj is Final Year student at NLU Delhi. The author’s views are personal. [1] Guru Nanak Foundation vs Rattan Singh & Sons (1981) SCC (4) 634. [2] 2003 (5) SCC 705. [3] 2015 (3) SCC 49. [4] 2014 (9) SCC 263. [5] Kochi Cricket Pvt. Ltd. v. Board of Control for Cricket in India (2018) 6 SCC 287. [6] 2018 (9) SCC 472. [7] 2019 SCCOnLine SC 1520. [8]2020SCCOnline SC 381[9] Cheran Properties Limited v. Kasturi & Sons Ltd. (2018) 16 SCC 413; Sundaram Finance Ltd. Abdul Samad (2018) 3 SCC 622. Next Storylast_img read more

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Calling Media’s Reporting In Sushant Singh Rajput Case ‘Disturbing’, PIL Before Bombay HC Seeks To Expand The Scope Of Contempt Of Courts Act, Notice Issued [Read Petition]

first_imgNews UpdatesCalling Media’s Reporting In Sushant Singh Rajput Case ‘Disturbing’, PIL Before Bombay HC Seeks To Expand The Scope Of Contempt Of Courts Act, Notice Issued [Read Petition] Nitish Kashyap15 Sep 2020 2:55 AMShare This – xThe Bombay High Court on Tuesday issued notice in a PIL seeking to expand the scope of the Contempt of Courts Act to include the starting point of the pending proceedings in a case to be from registration of FIR, for the purpose of invoking the said Act, in cases of publications which obstruct or tend to obstruct the administration of justice.The petitioners alleged that reporting in the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Bombay High Court on Tuesday issued notice in a PIL seeking to expand the scope of the Contempt of Courts Act to include the starting point of the pending proceedings in a case to be from registration of FIR, for the purpose of invoking the said Act, in cases of publications which obstruct or tend to obstruct the administration of justice.The petitioners alleged that reporting in the Sushant Rajput case has been disturbing and time has come to expand the scope of the act.Division bench of Chief Justice Dipankar Datta and Justice GS Kulkarni were hearing the said PIL filed by In Pursuit of Justice, a society registered under the Maharashtra Public Trust Act. Court issued notices to Union Of India, Law Commission and Press Council of India.Petitioner society has also sought direction to the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting to issue appropriate orders/notification cautioning the media outlets and print media houses from publication/broadcasting of information which is likely to obstruct the administration of justice, including the process of investigation.Referring to the coverage of Sushant Singh Rajput’s case, petitioner contended that in recent times, the media has become very proactive in focusing on incidents of crime from day one by liberally commenting on the role of the police causing the investigation, the progress of the investigation, pinpointing and declaring the perpetrator of the crime, their associates, motive, etc. even before the investigation is complete and sufficient opportunity is given to the police machinery to ascertain relevant facts.Filed on behalf of the petitioner by Dr.Neela Gokhale, Advocate Kushal Chaudhary and Advocate Shruti Dixit, the PIL states-“The recent spate of media reporting in the case of the untimely demise of actor Sushant Singh Rajput and the extent of media frenzy concerning all issues and nonissues involving the said incident is quite disturbing. It has given rise to an urgent need of finding an acceptable constitutional balance between free press and administration of justice which in itself is a difficult task in every legal system.”Thus, the petitioners argue that there is also an urgent need to examine and interpret Section 3(2) of the Contempt of Courts Act, 1971, to include within its scope and ambit any publication made which obstructs or tends to obstruct the administration of justice during the pendency of proceedings, the starting point of which shall be read to be from the registration of FIR instead of filing of the final report under Section 173 of the CrPC. Even the Law Commission in its 200th Report has also recommended that the starting point of the proceedings should be from the time a person is arrested instead of the filing of charge sheet, as the provision presently postulates, it was argued on behalf of the petitioners.Moreover, the PIL contends-“The filing of the present petition has been triggered by the disturbing and continuous reporting of the SSR case whereby the sanctity of the state police machinery has been demolished and the public opinion has been sought to be manipulated against the state law and order machinery, leading to an inevitable ramification that the faith and confidence of the citizens of in the police machinery of the state has been seriously impaired. This has led to a general belief that the state machinery cannot be trusted and has completely shattered the credence and reliability which the citizens are entitled to have in the local police machinery. Thus, this is nothing but an obstruction in the administration of justice and a general distrust in public institutions which is an extremely dangerous state of affairs to suffer in a democratic state.”Petitioners have also argued that it’s not just the police that bears the brunt of such ‘irresponsible reporting’, even accused, victims and witnesses have not remained unscathed by the relentless intrusion in their private lives. “In addition to the police being tarnished as incompetent and complacent in screening the concerned accused, the potential witnesses have been exposed by identifying them, interviewing them, bringing them in the public eye, deposing them on TV channels, terming their statements as confessions to such an extent that the potential witness, eventually when is required by law to depose on oath before a court of competent jurisdiction, is faced with the dilemma of sticking to his unverified public statement given to a reporter & stating the truth, when confronted on the witness stand. The witness is torn between telling the undistorted truth on the witness stand and retaining his public image by sticking to the statements to a journalist which may have been informally given, but have been heard and registered by the public.”It has thus, become necessary in the interest of justice that the said provision in the Contempt of Courts Act be read down to deem that such publication may also be contemptuous as soon as an FIR is registered against a person since, the persistent salacious publication may be prejudicial to the procedure and proceedings contemplated under the ‘due process of law’ which shall eventually culminate in a fair trial. It is evident that such to affect the publication is seriously likely an investigation in progress and the final report to be submitted by the Agency may be affected by perceptions and prejudices created amongst the public by media pressure, the petitioner society has urged.Recently, while hearing similar PILs seeking directions for fair reporting in the Sushant Singh Rajput death case, Bombay High Court had urged the media to show restraint in reporting and not to hamper investigation of the case.Click Here To Download Petition[Read Petition] Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Truck Driver Illegally Detained By Police: Patna High Court Asks Govt To Give 5L Compensation For Violation Of Fundamental Right

first_imgNews UpdatesTruck Driver Illegally Detained By Police: Patna High Court Asks Govt To Give 5L Compensation For Violation Of Fundamental Right Akshita Saxena22 Dec 2020 11:03 PMShare This – x”State must consider issues about truck drivers’ healthcare; access to food; working hours; payment of wages; literacy and access to technology.”The Patna High Court on Tuesday awarded Rs. 5,00,000/- as compensation to a truck driver who was illegally detained and kept in custody for over 35 days by the Patna Police. A Bench of Chief Justice Sanjay Karol and Justice S. Kumar observed that the Police authorities in this case had acted in clear violation of the procedure established by law, inasmuch as the vehicle and the detenue…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Patna High Court on Tuesday awarded Rs. 5,00,000/- as compensation to a truck driver who was illegally detained and kept in custody for over 35 days by the Patna Police. A Bench of Chief Justice Sanjay Karol and Justice S. Kumar observed that the Police authorities in this case had acted in clear violation of the procedure established by law, inasmuch as the vehicle and the detenue were detained and kept in police custody for more than 35 days, without either filing of FIR or following any other procedure of arrest prescribed in law, ensuring constitutional protections to all persons.It thus held that the authorities had acted in direct violation of detenue’s fundamental rights under Articles 21 and 22 of the Constitution and ordered,”The State of Bihar shall pay compensation to the detenue, namely, Mr. Jitendra Kumar @ Sanjay Kumar, an amount of Rs.5,00,000/- (Rupees Five lac) for the violation of his fundamental right under Article 21 of the Constitution of India. This amount shall positively be paid within a period of six weeks from today.”The Court expressed that truck drivers in India are not only under an endless pressure to make their ends meet, but are also susceptible to be at odds with the law and other functionaries of the State. “Their life is defined by great hardship and sacrifice. They are under constant pressure to complete long journeys in short durations; operate under conditions of extreme lack of sleep; lack proper sanitation along highways and roads; have improper access to food and water, and have to spend most of their time away from their families. Along with these gruelling adversities, they are at constant odds with the police and State authorities, while trying to protect themselves from the continuous threat of highway robberies,” it observed. It thus stated that there is an immediate need to improve the conditions of truck drivers in the State of Bihar as well as across the country, and issued a series of directions for protection and welfare of truck drivers, reproduced at the end of this report. Role & Problems of Truck Drivers The Bench observed that the extreme vulnerabilities faced by truck drivers in India often makes them prone to derelictions of the dark side of human civilization. It noted that whereas truck drivers act as the backbone of the national economy, they are amongst the most vulnerable sections of our society. The Bench remarked, “The backbone of the national economy is dependent upon the untiring and ever driving efforts and labour of the poor, mostly illiterate and the vulnerable. In the absence of the hard work and toil of truck drivers, economic activity throughout the country is bound to come to a standstill. Truck drivers are faced with a great deal of high stress and pressure as part of their job. The introduction of the additional hassle and trauma, perpetuated by the authorities, through the use of hostility and torture is akin to grave human injustice. Such practices are a clear violation of the human rights guaranteed to every citizen of the world.” It observed that the government institutions must understand that in any democracy, the right to live with dignity and self-worth, cannot be defiled within the ambit of Rule of Law and good governance. The Court rooted for proper education for truck drivers and focus on their healthcare, as they are undeniably invaluable to the prosperity and development both of the State and the Nation. In this context, the Court has directed the State of Bihar to make efforts towards improving the conditions of the truck drivers and consider issues about their healthcare; access to food; working hours; payment of wages; literacy and access to technology. “The truck drivers face constant problems with the authorities during their course of travel. They have to cross several checkpoints while crossing states/UTs. The authorities can be particularly discriminatory at these checkpoints against the truck drivers. The lack of literacy among the truck drivers and significant disparity across state laws can be a huge barrier in their compelling journey. The drivers at the ground level are required to deal with the authorities, and lack of proper knowledge gives the latter enough leverage to harass and haggle these former while stopping the movement of trucks altogether. This unnecessary practise causes a tremendous amount of time lost to the National Economy as well as the Economy of the State. It is apparent that they are invaluable to the movement of the Economy and face widespread discrimination and constant hardships. The State ought to consider constituting a body to address these issues. There is an immediate need to address the human rights violations faced by them,” the Bench emphasized. Background The petition was filed by the Truck owner, alleging that the Police illegally detained his vehicle (milk tanker) along with its driver, namely, Jitendra Kumar, without lodging of any FIR and/or following the appropriate procedures of recording the detention of the individual or impounding the vehicle, rendering the seizure unlawful and detention illegal. As per the Police version, the milk tanker and the detenue were apprehended on account of an accident injuring the pedestrian. Allegedly, the detenue fled from the spot of the accident and later on the vehicle intercepted by the officials of another Police Station i.e. Dariapur Police Station and handed over to the officials of Parsa Police Station. The FIR was not filed promptly as the officers-in-charge could not track down the injured person. Further, the driver (detenue) was never detained and he willingly sat inside the vehicle parked outside the police compound. As per the detenu however, the tanker vehicle was seized in the jurisdiction of Parsa Police Station. The tanker was taken to a nearby dairy for milk to be extracted and thereinafter detained at the police station where the detenue was detained in extra-judicial custody. Findings Illegal Detention and Breach of Fundamental Rights The Court observed that the Police version of the said incident was quite ‘unplausible’ inasmuch as it failed to answer several essential questions, leaving holes in their story, viz.: (i) why did the Police not register the FIR immediately when the vehicle driven by the detenue was intercepted (ii) Why was the vehicle not impounded? (iii) why was the drive not produced before the Court? (iv) when there was no statement of a person witnessing the occurrence of the accident, then how did the Police get to know of such facts? In this backdrop the Court observed that the instant case indicated a grim state of affairs where the police officials have acted in contravention and violation of the procedure established by law. “The vehicle and detenue were detained and kept in police custody for more than 35 days without either filing of FIR or following any other procedure of arrest prescribed in law, ensuring constitutional protections to all persons,” the Court observed. It held that such illegal detention of the detenu truck driver directly infringed his right to personal liberty enshrined under Article 21 of the Constitution and thus, he is entitled to compensation under public law remedy. Procedure of Arrest required to be followed The Court observed that there was no statement of any person witnessing the occurrence of the accident. Thus, the Police had no suspicion of the detenue having committed any non-cognizable offence, as mandatorily required of initiating action under Section 41 CrPC. “There was neither any complaint nor any credible information warranting detention without the order of any Magistrate,” the bench noted. It further observed that no FIR was registered against the accused, in contravention of Section 154 of CrPC and the mandatory directions of the Supreme Court in Lalita Kumari v. Govt. of Uttar Pradesh, (2014) 2 SCC 1. Father, the detenue was not produced before the Magistrate within 24 hours, as required under Section 56 of CrPC; the information of his arrest was not supplied to a friend, relative or close person or entry made in the book, as required under Section 56A CrPC; and the accused was not informed of the ground of arrest, as required under Section 50 CrPC, thus depriving him of his right seeking bail. Furthermore, the Police did not serve notice under Section 41A CrPC, either upon the owner of the vehicle or the person driving at the time of occurrence of the alleged accident. Thus, there was an infraction of not only the said provision but also Section 41B CrPC which requires the memo of arrest to be prepared furnishing correct and complete information, as available, and witnessed by any independent person. Moreover, the valuable right of the accused of seeking legal advice envisaged under Section 41D CrPC stood infringed. Inter alia, the guidelines of arrest and detention laid down by the Supreme Court in DK Basu v. State of West Bengal, AIR 1997 SC 610, Joginder Kumar v. State of UP, (1994) 4 SCC 260, and Arnesh Kumar v. State of Bihar, (2014) 8 SCC 273, were also violated. The detenu’s right to a fair investigation, which was held to be a facet of a fair trial under Article 21 of the Constitution by the Supreme Court in Gangadhar @ Gangaram v. State of Madhya Pradesh, 2020 SCCC OnLine SC 623, was also said to be violated. Noting such rampant violations of the law, the Court remarked that the concerned Police officers are liable for prosecution under Section 166 IPC. “In our considered view, simply taking up action of initiation of disciplinary proceedings is not enough. The entire Police Force needs to be sensitized of the constitutional and statutory rights of the detenue/accused, also from the angle of human rights,” the Bench added. Detention of Vehicle without FIR or Seizure Memo, Power and procedure for detaining vehicles The Court observed that the manner in which the police officers apprehended the milk tanker/ vehicle was in complete violation of the procedure for seizure established by law. It noted that the concern officers paid no heed to the mandate under Section 102 of CrPC (power to seize on suspicion of commission of any offense); Section 207 of the Motor Vehicle Act (power to seize vehicle if it is found to be in contravention of the Act); and the procedure for seizure, described under Section 457 of CrPC. However, the Court refrained from taking any decision thereof and granted liberty to the Petitioner to seek remedy before the appropriate forum, under private law. Right to Compensation under Articles 32 & 226 of the Constitution of India for Violation of Fundamental Rights Since the Court concluded that the Police officials had violated the detenu’s fundamental rights, it proceeded to observe that the instant case is fit for hefty compensation to be levied on the State. It directed the State of Bihar to pay an amount of Rs.5,00,000/- as compensation to the detenue, within a period of six weeks, for the violation of his fundamental right under Article 21 of the Constitution of India. The Court referred to a number of precedents to clarify that relief of monetary compensation, as exemplary damages, can be granted in writ proceedings under Article 32 or under Article 226, for established infringement of the indefeasible right guaranteed under Article 21 of the Constitution. It observed, “The purpose of public law is not only to civilize public power but also to assure the citizen that they live under a legal system which aims to protect their interests and preserve their rights. Therefore, when the Court moulds the relief by granting “compensation” in proceedings under Article 32 or 226 of the Constitution seeking enforcement or protection of fundamental rights, it does so under the public law by way of penalizing the wrongdoer and fixing the liability for the public wrong on the State which has failed in its public duty to protect the fundamental rights of the citizen.” The Court further observed that the purpose of this compensation is to restore the confidence of the citizen in the system where their rights and interests are preserved. “The payment of compensation in such cases is not to be understood, as it is generally understood in a civil action for damages under the private law but in the broader sense of providing relief by order of making ‘monetary amends’ under the public law for the wrong done due to breach of public duty, of not protecting the fundamental rights of the citizen. The compensation is like ‘exemplary damages’ awarded against the wrongdoer for the breach of its public law duty. It is independent of the rights available to the aggrieved party to claim compensation under the private law in action based on tort, through a suit instituted in a court of competent jurisdiction or/and prosecute the offender under the penal law,” the Court added. The Court has clarified that the right of the detenu to seek compensation under public law is independent of his right to claim other damages as private law remedy. Directions: The State of Bihar shall pay compensation to the detenue, namely, Mr. Jitendra Kumar @ Sanjay Kumar, an amount of Rs.5,00,000/- (Rupees Five lac) for the violation of his fundamental right under Article 21 of the Constitution of India. This amount shall positively be paid within a period of six weeks from today.This compensation would be without prejudice to and independent of any remedy for damages in private law that the petitioner and/or detenue may wish to avail. Appropriate disciplinary action/disciplinary proceedings already stands initiated against the erring police officers, which proceedings be expedited and positively concluded within a period of three months from today. Action taken report be filed in the Registry on or before 30th of April, 2021. The Director General of Police, Government of Bihar shall ensure initiation of criminal proceedings against the erring police officers and file compliance report on his personal affidavit within a period of four weeks from today. The Director General of Police, Government of Bihar shall ensure that proceedings under the other Laws, including Bihar police Manual, 1978 applicable in the State of Bihar are immediately initiated against the erring officials.The Director General of Police, Government of Bihar shall ensure that appropriate action for sensitizing the entire police force, especially, the constabulary in Bihar, with special focus on safeguarding the fundamental rights of citizens is taken. The Director General of Police, Government of Bihar shall ensure proper and effective functioning of a Complaint Redressal Mechanism, easily accessible to the general public, especially illiterate and the marginalized people of the State.The appropriate authorities take the eye opening facts of this case, of the instances of abuse of process in the State of Bihar, as an opportunity to ensure better supervision over the Police Stations, preventing reoccurrence of such cases of constitutional violations. The Director General of Police, Government of Bihar shall get a report prepared, with respect to the number and the nature of the complaints filed against the police officers/officials, and take remedial measures preventing repeated occurrence of such misconduct.The State of Bihar shall consider forming a body to represent the views of the truck drivers and provide them with a complaint redressal mechanism.The State of Bihar shall make efforts towards improving the conditions of the truck drivers. They must consider issues about their healthcare; access to food; working hours; payment of wages; literacy and access to technology.Engage the Civil Society in generally building goodwill of the entire police force amongst the residents of Bihar. Case Title: Sumit Kumar v. State of Bihar & Ors.Appearance: Advocate Sanchay Srivastava (for Petitioner); AC to AG Pawan Kumar (for State)  Click Here To Download Order Read OrderNext Storylast_img read more

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